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Betrayed by my Program

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by This This Member

My ASN nursing program is two years long with LPN/LVN diploma after the first year, I'm in the fall term of my second year and I hold a license in nursing.

I have come to the conclusion that my school isn't hard for the sake of being challenging, its hard for the sake of being near impossible. Last year my school had a 100% pass rate for both the LPN and RN NCLEX, although the majority of our class was a C average. I am going flat out say this pass rate has nothing to do with the quality of my program and everything to do with the unbelievable tolerance and my restraint my peers have in the face of overwhelming amounts of total BS.

I can't depend on most all my instructors for anything. I feel like the butt of some hidden joke that I just can't see. The truth of the matter is, me and my classmates were baited into this program after so many promises on how great the program and its instructors were. We were selected from the best of 500 applicants and went though furious scrutiny to just make it into the program, but as soon as we really took off, we were shafted by our instructors. In a class of all 4.0 students we had around 15 people flunk in the first year, we've probably lost half a dozen this year already.

I basically feel like an auto-didactic along with most of my peers because my nursing education is merely an outlet for my faculty to teach me about their own person anecdotes and opinion on how they think a nurse should act. In the rest of my free time I teach myself real nursing school curriculum to build up a real knowledge base for the NCLEX.

I can't depend on any of our curriculum for any consistency from lecture to lecture or instructor to instructor. If they mess up the lecture notes they blame us for not memorizing the reading. If we memorize the reading we're told we should have stuck with the powerpoint. We have had several tests where over 75% failed and where told it was "obviously the students fault." We find errors in their tests all the time and I would estimate they fix maybe one in ten questions that they got wrong or gave us one correct choice between two right answers and no proof to back one up over the other.

We've all invested 2-3 years of commitment, work, and emotions into passing this program. My instructors know this and only use it as more leverage to set the bar impossibly high. They know we have no choice but to comply and try and stay afloat, because the ONLY thing worse then this program is flunking out and having to waste a whole year and a half(or longer) to roll the dice and risk massive uncertainty on another program. There are no retakes or redos. Its pass/fail with a laughable lettergrade attached as an afterthought.

I understand that certainly life is very hard, indifferent, and not always fair, but this is a binary matter of education and measurable objective skills. It should not be ruled by opinion. The risk-benefit ratio of the input of time vs the output of test scores is resting on the edge of a razorblade and I'm getting burnt out. I'm watching students deteriorate into a potentially dangerous states of mind. Two of my classmates failed for no reason beyond a bad luck of the draw and I struggled to talk them down from suicide. I'm on the brink of contacting an attorney because I'm worried that this program will push my friends into harming themselves. They are flunking people by 0.1% when I could easy browse their test questions and find a margin of error around 5%, not counting the subjective questions on transient nursing rhetoric, oops I mean nursing logic.

I have seen no proof that the methods my school uses to force high NCLEX pass rates is anything more then the most reckless and diluted superficial attempt to mask the symptoms of a problem rather then treating the underlying cause.

I'm afraid to talk about it even here because we're forbidden from speaking up about it and I could be axed in the flinch of an eye for violating conduct codes we're forced to sign, but I've been burning the candle at both ends for so long now and I don't know how to turn the other cheek anymore. This does not make me a better nurse. I can beat my head against a brick wall until the cows come home but at the end of the day I'm unconvinced that near-constant state of hopeless panic facilitates a good learning experience.

I don't know what to do.

kgh31386, BSN, MSN, RN

Has 4 years experience.

I'm going to go with another bullet point response..I do have a few questions

1. How were you baited exactly? I would have just done some research and seen what recent graduates and current students have said about the program. Can you go to the dean with your concerns?

2. If they have a 100% pass rate, how many students are in each of the graduating classes? Because a 100% pass rate is usually indicative of adequate preparation from their school.

3. As a student, what grounds do you have to judge the teacher's method(s)? There are countless threads on here about how students try to "one up" their instructors instead of sitting back and really thinking about what's being told. This isn't meant to be attacking or angry, but you're a student..they're the teacher. If the teachers were REALLY that bad, the accrediting body would have heard about it and done something. Every few years the school is evaluated in order to determine their accreditation status. If the school is that bad, they wouldn't be accredited. The committees look at student evaluations, grades, pass rates, etc.

4. Your friends who failed and were on brink of suicide...you say they failed for no reason. There would have to be a reason they failed. You say it's full of 4.0 students, I doubt EVERYONE has a 4.0...and straight A student or not, some people will fail. A lot of students have a 4.0 in pre-req courses and fail in numerous majors, degrees, etc. You can make it into pharmacy school, med school, law school, etc. and fail out.

5. If the bar were impossibly high, people would not attend the program, nor would anyone graduate. If it were really that horrible and unfair, why would they have 500 applicants? I'm sure not everyone of those 500 is baited.

6. It's also interesting you judge the test questions as being subjective. Like I've said before, if one person can pass...the others can as well. I also doubt they really have 10+ questions wrong on the exams. Do you have the opportunity to show them exactly where the question has an error?

7. I wouldn't get an attorney because the truth is..people are passing, and their NCLEX pass rate is 100%. If your friends harm themselves, they have no grounds to blame the program. MIT has the highest suicide rates and people still strive their hardest to go there. It's one of the hardest schools in the nation, and some people can't take the stress..but others can.

8. And test questions will have 2 right answers sometimes, maybe 3. But the proof is somewhere in the book, notes, or they may have just said it in lecture. Just because it's not in the book, or notes doesn't mean the instructor didn't say it. I've heard students say "omg that wasn't in the notes or the book!". Well the instructor said it as a side note or as an example, and the student might have been on their laptop, texting, sleeping, or not even in class..whose fault is that?

To sum it all up, if it's really that awful..you should look at another program. You say you have a license, you can work under that license until you find a suitable program. You should do some research into beforehand though. I hope it all works out.:up:

Edited by kgh31386

I completely understand where you are coming from. I actually felt compelled to respond to this thread because the only other response you received obviously didn't understand that you didn't post this to complain, you posted this for support, and for someone to understand where you are coming from. Yes, nursing school is difficult no matter where you study, but some programs are more challenging that others...and it seems that in your case it is ridiculously difficult. I love the program I'm in now and can appreciate it because I've been to another school that was completely unnecessarily challenging. I honestly believe the professors where there to inflict pain, not teach. Like you mentioned, they would blame the students for their own shortcomings. By the end of the semester only 1/3 of the class remained. Their success rate was so high because anyone with an ounce of doubt of passing was weeded out in the beginning.

The school did choose you though, they chose you because they knew you could do it. This will only make you stronger and make you appreciate being a nurse even more. We feel your pain and good luck!!!

CCL RN, RN

Specializes in Cath Lab/ ICU. Has 10 years experience.

Lots of people failed out of my program too...Thank goodness! Not everyone should be a nurse. Time to accept that.

I did extrermely well in my program, but I could find probably 50 people who said the exact same thing about my program that you did. How is it that people pass your program and become nurses? Oh, its because they don't act like victims, and cast blame on everyone and everything when they cant get their way.

Baited? Really? I seriously doubt that. At what point do you do your own research?

Here are your options.

Get better.

Move on.

And if people are suicidal during nursing school, then they will NEVER survive nursing!

1. How were you baited exactly? I would have just done some research and seen what recent graduates and current students have said about the program. Can you go to the dean with your concerns?

I did the research and it was implied to me through all the career councilors, newspaper articles, and defunct statistics that this program was the greatest thing since sliced butter. The orientations I attended sold us on the idea that its very hard to get accepted and the application process is very arduous, but once accepted, it was going to be a very positive and supportive experience.

It was all a bogus. Once in, we hit the ground running while trying to sort out expectations from a clumsy hack up of random principles hopelessly deluded in a giant pool of supposition. My instructors didn't bother to converge ideas with each other involving overlapping material such as common drugs and clinical impressions. They were almost never available for private discussion and when they were it was kept brief and always diversionary eg. "That's not my subject." To make things worse I later found out that as a student I couldn't voice my complaints publicly about my own program. The option of talking the dean wasn't really on the table because one everyone was scared of student-staff alienation and we were all still in our first year and convinced the situation was a fluke.

2. If they have a 100% pass rate, how many students are in each of the graduating classes? Because a 100% pass rate is usually indicative of adequate preparation from their school.

It was only the rate for last year, we found out after getting accepted from the second years that their numbers had taken a plunge. Rather then focus on curriculum overhaul they just multiplied the difficulty of their tests by an order of magnitude. I can still pull out pharmacology test questions from the first test we had in second quarter and stump a nurse practitioner. Another fact about the pass rate its still as is, where many students in my year did not seek LPN as well as a lot of second years who have staved off the RN for the time being.

In my experience my ability to pass the nclex was dependent on my capacity to ignore or replace a large part of my lecture and theory knowledge. I had the opportunity to test this understanding with the HESI and that also factored into my decision to go through with licensure. I recall many classmates doing poorly on it and in general they opted out because of the 600 price tag was a gamble at the time.

From my point of view, calling my school a -good- school because the pass rate was 100% is akin to calling a dog -obedient- after you have muzzled his snout and chained him to a fence.

It kind of makes me angry too because my concerns are ignored but my achievements in spite of those concerns is misrepresented to sell my programs image, perpetuating the same problems.

3. As a student, what grounds do you have to judge the teacher's method(s)? There are countless threads on here about how students try to "one up" their instructors instead of sitting back and really thinking about what's being told. This isn't meant to be attacking or angry, but you're a student..they're the teacher. If the teachers were REALLY that bad, the accrediting body would have heard about it and done something. Every few years the school is evaluated in order to determine their accreditation status. If the school is that bad, they wouldn't be accredited. The committees look at student evaluations, grades, pass rates, etc.

I didn't say all of them, but generally speaking, the better the instructor, the less influence they had as part of the whole so in the end no student had a single guide in their corner. The faculty leaders gave no support, consistency, rational, or appeal. The clinical groups were rift with problems and we were informed that our program was fighting for placement in its historic resources and losing ground to universities. This implied that our learning experience was especially scrutinized and would have lasting effects depending on how we carried our program. The rule of thumb was if you reported a mistake like a good nurse, you would face the full brunt of your student contract. The learning environment is supposed to be one where you are allowed a casual mistake or two. Our policy was one strike and your out. I can't tell you how stupid the reason was when they booted one person out from a self-reported clinical error, but believe me when I say it was minor and totally indicative that a quota of discipline was being pursued behind the scenes.

4. Your friends who failed and were on brink of suicide...you say they failed for no reason. There would have to be a reason they failed. You say it's full of 4.0 students, I doubt EVERYONE has a 4.0...and straight A student or not, some people will fail. A lot of students have a 4.0 in pre-req courses and fail in numerous majors, degrees, etc. You can make it into pharmacy school, med school, law school, etc. and fail out.

I can't go into specifics, but as I said, I know for a fact that one out of every twenty or so questions they asked, they took the wrong answer out of their notes. I took them to the testing instructor for my school and they couldn't even reach the teachers to return comment. Emailing the teachers about test questions was pointless and students who did had a very hard time passing subjective clinical outcomes like communication.

5. If the bar were impossibly high, people would not attend the program, nor would anyone graduate. If it were really that horrible and unfair, why would they have 500 applicants? I'm sure not everyone of those 500 is baited.

Its all under wraps. I studied in the main hall frequently and observed the tour guides showing off our simulation laboratories to the freshmen. We only used the sim lab once a term, yet I sat a watch as the tour guides lied through their teeth about all the time we spent in sim and all the incredible functions our simulation mannequins possessed. I also reported this discrepancy to the faculty, yet the same exact thing happened the very next day.

6. It's also interesting you judge the test questions as being subjective. Like I've said before, if one person can pass...the others can as well. I also doubt they really have 10+ questions wrong on the exams. Do you have the opportunity to show them exactly where the question has an error?

I said that the margin of error was about 5%, and that was rather conservative. The point is I don't see the efficacy in failing someone for a 74.4% with those odds. The average hovered just above that with nary an outlier below the established margin of error. We started off first year with the ability to report errors in their tests, but by the end of the year it was basically verboten. The best response I ever got was simply reassurance from the good instructors that "I would make it", absent of an explanation. The worst were demeaning and unpredictable. One minute our books are an all-encompassing resource for my instructors to yank any agreeable citation to affirm themselves with and the next minute I'm hearing an anecdote about the dumb doctor who refused to believe something if it wasn't previously documented. Logic and reason always seem to yield to intuition in my instructors favor. My generation was not raised that way so we experienced a pseudo-ideological clash despite our schools promotion of strictly evidenced based practice.

8. And test questions will have 2 right answers sometimes, maybe 3. But the proof is somewhere in the book, notes, or they may have just said it in lecture. Just because it's not in the book, or notes doesn't mean the instructor didn't say it. I've heard students say "omg that wasn't in the notes or the book!". Well the instructor said it as a side note or as an example, and the student might have been on their laptop, texting, sleeping, or not even in class..whose fault is that?

I guess I would argue that questions involved in science like pharmacology and pathophys don't stray into opinion. We recorded our lectures and those scientific concepts are the only questions I focused on for erroneous statements to pull the 5%. Now and then our outlines included reading, but it was just tacked on as a safety net to cover our instructors backs if they left out a key concept. I knew students who didn't even buy the books and scored A's where as I was struggling with low B's and consuming every assigned page of reading in addition to the lectures.

We all talked about switching programs but by the time we discovered the depth of deception in our second and third term, it was too far gone for us to transfer out to something this fall.

Again, its not hard for the sake of being challenging, its hard for the sake of being hard to force us into filling two molds at once. Our instructors molds, and the nclex's molds, with every and all their repercussions but independent of their guidance or help.

That Guy, BSN, RN, EMT-B

Specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab. Has 6 years experience.

I did the research and it was implied to me through all the career councilors, newspaper articles, and defunct statistics that this program was the greatest thing since sliced butter. The orientations I attended sold us on the idea that its very hard to get accepted and the application process is very arduous, but once accepted, it was going to be a very positive and supportive experience.

Should have asked the students. Best area for input on the program PERIOD

kgh31386, BSN, MSN, RN

Has 4 years experience.

I actually felt compelled to respond to this thread because the only other response you received obviously didn't understand that you didn't post this to complain, you posted this for support, and for someone to understand where you are coming from.

I never said they were complaining, show me where I said that? And my response was not supporting, you are correct...it was simply asking for some more explanation, and they provided a very in depth explanation.

I honestly believe the professors where there to inflict pain, not teach. Like you mentioned, they would blame the students for their own shortcomings. By the end of the semester only 1/3 of the class remained. Their success rate was so high because anyone with an ounce of doubt of passing was weeded out in the beginning.

And as stated above, not everyone should be a nurse. And really, inflict pain, not teach? We JUST had a discussion about "being the victim". The OP was not trying to form a sorrow group. The suggestion of changing programs is not an option. I would write a letter to the state, the main college(if your NS is part of a bigger school), or someone along those lines. You shouldn't fear the dean.

Thanks for your input, there's always some release in universality. Some of us students have had sit downs before, heads in our hands, trying to find the point to all this. We all can appreciate the need to weed out the dangerously incompetent like the hypo-mathematics or the overly combative students, but goes much deeper then that. Its a teaching failure, we're listening, but I'm not going to memorize the exact word of the teacher when she confuses glucagon and glycogen. The hardest thing for us to swallow was the fact that no one will really know what we dealt with. I have no right to pretend I'm better, smarter, or tougher then your nursing student a county over, but when I see my other friends from the universities having fun I can't lie that I get a little envious.

1/3rd is insanity. That erks me to a bad degree. We're not stupid! we're just not psychic. I suppose it will make me better able to cope with the stresses in the future, but I wasn't planning on acting grim and stoic for at least another five years. I guess will try to collect myself and keep going. Thanks again.

That prev comment was directed to moorejulie, the header was lost when I sent it.

CCL RN

And if people are suicidal during nursing school, then they will NEVER survive nursing!

Right so go ahead and explain that one to the working 40-hour week person minus two significant others IE dead, in the same week that you flunk out of a 3 year commitment to nursing school by a difference of about 4 multiple choice questions from an instructor who proclaims that hypoxia and hypoxemia are the same thing, or that you would not expect any dyspnea in COPD patients, and that your failure was completely intrinsic IE your fault. Please tell me exactly how you would address this persons feelings when you are in this position and what coping mechanisms you would tell them to use. In fact please go on to explain what you would do if you had found yourself in this position, because as you implied, your smarter and stronger then roughly 50 peers so I am quite interested in discovering your secret.

I commiserate with you OP. I often respond to posts like yours because while I agree nursing school shouldn't be easy, the level of difficulty ought to be related to relevant knowledge and *real* critical thinking skills, not test-taking strategies and one's ability to 'fly under the radar'. You can also find others with similar experiences. Do you know how to do a search of previous threads?

I commiserate with you OP. I often respond to posts like yours because while I agree nursing school shouldn't be easy, the level of difficulty ought to be related to relevant knowledge and *real* critical thinking skills, not test-taking strategies and one's ability to 'fly under the radar'. You can also find others with similar experiences. Do you know how to do a search of previous threads?

Thanks for the response, as stated before, its good to know that we're not alone in our endeavors. I did a quick browse using phrases like "nursing school impossible/hard/ridiculous" but it did not prove efficacious in locating something more recent, so I guess I felt compelled to play the victim, at least according to CCL RN. But on the bright side I am having a blast with clinicals this term. I was granted some independence under the guidance of one of our best clinical instructors and I've felt right at home with my prioritization and acuity. My biggest distraction is watching others struggle because I'm still with one foot in the door but I've been lucky enough to get some really great RNs who don't mind my constant questions. Sometimes I can put on a pretty good face and bluff some confidence for my patients but without those RNs taking time to teach me, I'd be toast. A round of back pats for preceptors.

CCL RN, RN

Specializes in Cath Lab/ ICU. Has 10 years experience.

That prev comment was directed to moorejulie, the header was lost when I sent it.

Right so go ahead and explain that one to the working 40-hour week person minus two significant others IE dead, in the same week that you flunk out of a 3 year commitment to nursing school by a difference of about 4 multiple choice questions from an instructor who proclaims that hypoxia and hypoxemia are the same thing, or that you would not expect any dyspnea in COPD patients, and that your failure was completely intrinsic IE your fault. Please tell me exactly how you would address this persons feelings when you are in this position and what coping mechanisms you would tell them to use. In fact please go on to explain what you would do if you had found yourself in this position, because as you implied, your smarter and stronger then roughly 50 peers so I am quite interested in discovering your secret.

I did what I had to do to pass (easy) and didn't spend ANY time online rambling on about fault and blame. There. There's my secret.

Again, if you interviewed the students who failed my program, they'd say all the things you said. And yet, I passed and didn't find my program to be anything at all like the failing students had described. Funny how that is...

catz123

Specializes in LTC, Hospice, home health, ms, resp....

I am in an RN program that is very difficult. It has an extremely high pass rate and that is what's most important. Sure the stress level is high, but nursing can be very stressful. In my mind if I can pass this program, I can pass the NCLEX and that is the main goal. If you don't pass the NCLEX, then it was all a waste. In nursing we students as well as nurses and the professors (who by the way are nurses and have worked in the field) we have to do what we call critical thinking. Why can't you go on your class web site and post questions about the material where you are confused. Someone will respond and a teacher or two my even respond. This would be getting the support and knowledge from your peers who are in the class. Also when you take the time to explain it to someone else, you know you have it down. Instead of putting your focus on the bad and neg. take the time to figure out how to make it better. Good luck

Schools are there to do two things. 1) Get more money for the profit margin and 2) help you pass the NCLEX. It sounds to me like they are doing exactly that if they have 500 applicants a year and have a 100% pass rate.

Do schools weed people out if they think they won't be able to pass the NCLEX? Sure they do. A 100% NCLEX pass rate is a great selling point to help the school earn more money.

If they let anyone with a 74.9% slide into the next semester, where would it stop? If that student wasn't able to pass that class, how could they ever possibly pass NCLEX? If I were you and a friend didn't pass by that margin, I would see where they needed help, help them, and let them re-apply to pick up where they left off. If they were truly suicidal, I would help refer them to some outside agency to help them because at that point, it's beyond me.

Case in point, I missed my A last semester by one question on a test. ONE QUESTION. Not a percentage point but less than a 10th of a percentage point. Who's to blame? I am. Not the instructors, not the school, not even the test questions. Me. That's called accepting responsibility for one's own actions which is something we have to do as adult learners.

And, OP, like you said. You googled it. Do other schools really sound any different? You could go to another school and get wrapped up in even more problems or at the very least, run into different issues.

So, I have to agree with CCL RN. As many of the students in my class love to complain and sound just like you, I have a better time of nursing school because I don't focus on blaming or finger pointing. I do what I have to do to get by and stay positive. This is something that I chose to do for myself and my future. It's a short time in the grand scheme of things. If you don't like it, do something else. If you do stick with it, a better attitude will go a long way. Good luck.

kgh31386, BSN, MSN, RN

Has 4 years experience.

I have to agree with the above posts from Catz, CBs, and CCL RN...although mine was labeled as mean haha and not being supportive. It's not about support, it's about constructive criticism. If 1 person passed, everyone CAN pass. I highly doubt they have a bunch of nurses around who just get off on failing people. You say you have great clinical instructors, have you gone to them about this?

decembergrad2011, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 12 years experience.

It makes me SO mad when people can't just commiserate, and continuously take the instructor's side in a STUDENT forum. Let us have an outlet - please! If you are an RN already and want to get your jollies off complaining about the students - you have your own forum! I hope I'm never so far removed from nursing school after I graduate and become licensed that I forget the negatives of it, or the poor experiences I did have, to openly discuss and advise students in a loving manner. And I love my nursing school, and 90% of my instructors have been fantastic, but I can't deny that there are some problems within our program and curriculum, as there is at every school. I refuse to be a sheep that just says, "Oh well, that's the way it is" and I so dislike those individuals. They are the ones that will go on to work in the hospital that needs an overhaul, but will accept the status quo and won't care to speak up, fight, and inspire their co-workers to elicit change!

This wasn't an arrogant, condescending, or "woe is me" post by the OP. This was someone with legitimate concerns about her program that she communicated in a calm and logical manner.

OP - I understand what you mean when you say that some things are subjective or confusing unless you are in your instructor's head, like the correct way to communicate with your patient, or which teaching point is the most important to make when they both are high up on Maslow's hierarchy.

I also find it absolutely absurd that your instructors refuse to admit their mistakes when presented with evidence, and rely on the textbook to cover their butt. There should not be this idea that the instructors are infallible, especially when it comes to something as simply as correct medical terms. As well, instructors should be supportive of students coming to them with concerns about the exams. Every single course that I have had, my instructors have had course representatives (not necessarily the same students every semester) which meet from 1-3 times a semester with the primary course coordinator and discuss concerns with everything about the course. We are given a chance to provide feedback, we have opportunities to get out of class support with free tutors, and our clinicals have a bit of wiggle room for when it comes to mistakes. You have to do something very, very bad (like almost killing someone bad) to get booted from our program for one mistake. Do they hand out clinical day unsatisfactories like candy? Oh yes, definitely, and I have had a total of 5% deducted from my final grades due to 3 separate unsatisfactories while in nursing school. These were due to mistakes ranging from tardiness to not looking at my patient's arm band after asking them to state name & DOB during med administration.

What you have described is NOT what a normal nursing program should look like, and please don't let these post-grads tell you otherwise. I would recommend that you start keeping track of discrepancies like this, with name, date, and course, so that when you do graduate and pass your NCLEX, you can have the power to do something to change it for incoming nursing students if you wish to fight the good fight on the other side.

Hang in there, though - you deserve it! Then do your best to dissuade other students from applying to the program on the down low, or go public with the information with a group of your peers post-graduation. That's the best you can do at this point, in my opinion.

Edited by decembergrad2011
Had a lot more to say

It makes me SO mad when people can't just commiserate, and continuously take the instructor's side in a STUDENT forum. Let us have an outlet - please! If you are an RN already and want to get your jollies off complaining about the students - you have your own forum!

This wasn't an arrogant, condescending, or "woe is me" post by the OP. This was someone with legitimate concerns about her program that she communicated in a calm and logical manner.

OP - I understand what you mean when you say that some things are subjective or confusing unless you are in your instructor's head, like the correct way to communicate with your patient, or which teaching point is the most important to make when they both are high up on Maslow's hierarchy.

Hang in there, though - you deserve it! Then do your best to dissuade other students from applying to the program on the down low. That's the best you can do at this point, in my opinion.

I'm sorry that you are SO mad however I am a student currently in nursing school. I do not need to "just commiserate" because I don't agree with being negative and complaining, which is how I understood the OP's post to read. You have your opinion and I have my opinion and both are okay. We'll just have to agree to disagree.

decembergrad2011, BSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 12 years experience.

I'm sorry that you are SO mad however I am a student currently in nursing school. I do not need to "just commiserate" because I don't agree with being negative and complaining, which is how I understood the OP's post to read. You have your opinion and I have my opinion and both are okay. We'll just have to agree to disagree.

I'm glad that you will accept problems in your nursing school (and most likely your future place of employment) without speaking up, but that's not for all of us. Don't act like the OP is being unreasonable and unnecessarily negative when you didn't address any of her concerns. I'm sorry that you missed your A by a single test question, but that has nothing to do with the OP. I bet you'd have cause to be upset if you missed your A because the test material you learned was flawed, not representative of the material on the exam, or you did not have an opportunity to confront your professors when there was an obvious flaw in their test questions.

And yes, I do get mad when anyone, licensed or not, acts like students don't have a right to be frustrated or point out the flaws in their program.