Jump to content

Basic classes to become an RN

Posted
by drake2012 drake2012 (New) New

What are the basic classes to become an RN? My work pays for college but only something that benefits them and I'm wanting to take classes that benefit a nursing career also! Thanks :o)

NICUmiiki, DNP, NP

Specializes in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Has 6 years experience.

It would be one thing if you truly planned on finishing one if your employer's approved programs, decided it wasn't for you after you started, and some of the courses you took happened to be prereqs.

It's another thing to take their money with no intention on pursuing an approved program. It seems a bit like fraud.

Well I don't plan on staying here forever and if I take something that an benefit them and me as we'll I'm going to do it. I plan on pursuing in this company but my ultimate dream is to become a nurse. No fraud about that.

Also I was not asking your opinion on the situation, because you don't know my situation in life OBVIOUSLY, simply asking what the basic courses are.

What are the basic classes to become an RN? My work pays for college but only something that benefits them and I'm wanting to take classes that benefit a nursing career also! Thanks :o)

Depends the school and depends the degree or if you want a diploma.

Here are the most general classes that I think you have to take. The required English for an Associates degree, college algerbra, psychology, sociology, speech, biology for some colleges, chemistry. The big three that you must take, anatomy, physiology, microbiology.:up:

What are the basic classes to become an RN? My work pays for college but only something that benefits them and I'm wanting to take classes that benefit a nursing career also! Thanks :o)

What line of work is your employer in? Some of the pre-req classes for a nursing career vary greatly from classes for, say, a degree in business management. Examples are, Biology for SCIENCE majors instead of regular Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Chemistry (and in the case of some BSN programs, classes such as Biochemistry or Organic Chemistry). These are classes geared almost strictly for science majors. You also need Psychology and likely Sociology, in addition to the typical college algebra and english courses.

If your job is willing to pay for college towards a degree that furthers a career in THEIR line of work, and it's a non-science career, then you will not be able to pursue a nursing career on their dime only to up and leave them after you finish. That's not why they are willing to pay for a college education for you, they're paying for it so that you can pursue a degree to be used at that company for years to come.

Most schools post their degree reqirements online, so look them up. Look at both the prerequisite requirements and the classes that you're supposed to take once you've been accepted into the nursing program. Obviously taking the prereqs is your first priority, but getting any of them done will help.

NICUmiiki, DNP, NP

Specializes in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Has 6 years experience.

Also I was not asking your opinion on the situation, because you don't know my situation in life OBVIOUSLY, simply asking what the basic courses are.

No you did not ask my opinion, and I can see where I came off harsh toward you. I'm also not the interested in whether you wanted to hear my opinion or not. As you spend more time on this site, you will notice members offering their opinions (whether or not it is requested), and those opinions will vary greatly. It is each our right to do as long as we do not violate the TOS.

This first topic we cover in the very first nursing course at my school (which is a prereq to the actual program) is ethics, and your post seemed unethical. Granted, I don't know your situation in life, only the snippet you provided.

Edited by Miiki

Alisonisayoshi, LVN

Specializes in LTC.

I don't think it is wrong to take educational funds from an employer to do your core pre-req's (English math humanities ect) because those skills can be transferred into your current job. They get what they are paying for, a better employee. To do the sciences if you aren't in a scientific or medical field is a different story. So do the CORE stuff. I did all my core first then quit working because it was too much to the science with a job (for me).

No you did not ask my opinion, and I can see where I came off harsh toward you. I'm also not the interested in whether you wanted to hear my opinion or not. As you spend more time on this site, you will notice members offering their opinions (whether or not it is requested), and those opinions will vary greatly. It is each our right to do as long as we do not violate the TOS.

This first topic we cover in the very first nursing course at my school (which is a prereq to the actual program) is ethics, and your post seemed unethical. Granted, I don't know your situation in life, only the snippet you provided.

your behaivoir towards her seems very uncalled for, relax okay:nailbiting:

NICUmiiki, DNP, NP

Specializes in Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. Has 6 years experience.

Nevermind. This post was off topic.

Edited by Miiki

I would suggest taking the most general pre-req classes first. The ones that are required for almost any degree, regardless of field. Hopefully your employer would then approve the class, since it could be applied to a general business degree or something similar. It would also benefit you, in the future, by being something that applies to a nursing degree as well. What type of classes would benefit your work? What type of degree does your work have in mind? What do you ultimately want to pursue for yourself (ie ADN, BSN, etc.)? I am not familiar with two-year degrees, but I can give a little advice on a 4-year degree. I am working on my BSN right now. I would suggest taking a computer course. We are required to take a basic computer class for a BSN. (I took Business Computer Information Systems.) From what I understand, almost if not all bachelors degrees at my university require you to take this basic computer class to obtain a degree. A class such as this could be beneficial to your employer also. Other options to look into would be english, government, economics, math, history. We really need more information about your job to determine what your employer would find beneficial. Classes such as A&P and Micro are required for nursing school, but obviously not every major is required to take these courses. Your employer might not see you taking these classes as worthwhile to the company. Plus, my advice would be to take A&P as closer to starting nursing school. You will need to retain A&P for nursing classes. My advice.. start with the most general courses and work more specific to nursing as you progress. Best of luck!

Edited by Shorty11
Spelling