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atheism religion and religious hospitals

Spirituality   (15,196 Views | 57 Replies)

CalicoKitty has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med-surg.

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You are reading page 2 of atheism religion and religious hospitals. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

BSN16 specializes in ICU, trauma.

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Also, i remember hearing about a catholic hospital being sued by a few women because they were allowed to become extremely septic or suffered other life threatening symptoms because the hospital had a very strict policy on abortions being the last option and only if the mother's life was at risk. although HIGHLY unlikely you would encounter something this extreme, there may be something similar such as a policy relating to tubal ligation, and etc.

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Julius Seizure specializes in Pediatric Critical Care.

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I used to work at a catholic hospital, and now I work at a non-religiously affiliated hospital.

At the catholic hospital, they had a small chapel near the main lobby. They have one at my current hospital, too. They both provide a small, interdenominational service on sundays for those families and patients who choose to participate. However, my current hospital doesn't have a special week that they will do a blessing for your pets if you want it.

The catholic hospital had chaplains available 24/7. So does my current hospital. Both provide chaplains for various different faiths, not just catholic. Both hospitals have the chaplains go around during nurses week to provide a "blessing of the hands" to the nurses that would like to participate.

Neither hospital ever put any religious expectations on me as staff.

I guess the main difference was that in the catholic hospital, there was small cross hung over the door in every patient's room. I didn't even notice until I had been there almost a year.

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NotAllWhoWandeRN has 4 years experience as a ASN, RN.

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I briefly worked within a Catholic hospital, and I'm not Catholic. They specifically asked about my feelings about working for a religious system when I interviewed. I described their self-proclaimed values and told them those aren't just Catholic values, they're human values.

e.g.

  • Service of the poor: Generosity of spirit, especially for persons most in need.
  • Reverence: Respect and compassion for the dignity and diversity of life.
  • Integrity: Inspiring trust through personal leadership.
  • Wisdom: Integrating excellence and stewardship.
  • Creativity: Courageous innovation.

That's not religious ideology to me.

There were no religious overtones or discussions or requirements on the units. I never read much of the corporate e-mails so they didn't bother me.

They would broadcast a reflection every day at 8. If you were in a room with the door closed you couldn't even hear it. They had some religious imagery and statues around the hospital, which I found amusing. Posted "Code blue in the lobby!" to my FB with a pic of their statue of a collapsed Jesus in Mary's arms. Be able to laugh at the situation :)

(Oh, and their insurasnce covered my BCP)

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heron has 40 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

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Also, i remember hearing about a catholic hospital being sued by a few women because they were allowed to become extremely septic or suffered other life threatening symptoms because the hospital had a very strict policy on abortions being the last option and only if the mother's life was at risk. although HIGHLY unlikely you would encounter something this extreme, there may be something similar such as a policy relating to tubal ligation, and etc.

Good point. It would certainly raise ethical concerns to work someplace that forced or denied certain medical interventions based on their particular religion's rules.

I would definitely have ethical qualms about working on a Gyn or Ob service in a Catholic hospital. But I'm a post-menopausal medical/LTC/hospice nurse. I would be looking at factors that would directly control my practice as a nurse: end-of-life practices, mostly. Do they use religion as a justification to override advance directives? Would they treat married domestic partners or a civilly married gay couple and their children as a family? How do they handle ending life prolonging meds or artitificial feeding at the end of life? How does the facility treat the patient who needs and has chosen care that the facility won't provide due to religious values?

I don't think there's a blanket right answer, except that any ethical conflict would depend on the policies and the real-world behavior of a specific facility.

Edited by heron

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Maevish has 9 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU, Postpartum, Onc, PACU.

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I am an atheist. I work in a non-religious hospital. I like what I do, but there are 2 closer hospitals to me that are both religious. One Adventist and one Catholic. I really don't know how I'd feel working at a religious based hospital, since I feel that somehow I'd be "supporting" the religion. Is there a way of just thinking of it as a "job" without the ethical dilemma of working at a place that supports differing religious beliefs? (Not just geared towards atheists, but I know there are a lot of religions and the employees of various hospitals may not be working with the same one they believe in?) I also work in an area with a good amount of other beliefs like Jewish and Muslims.

 

So, more I'm asking how do you justify to yourselves working in a place with different spiritual values, or would you avoid that from an ethical standpoint.

(I really could go for a job 3 miles from home, I mean, I could walk it!). Just having a hard time wrapping my heart around it.

It's a job. They can't make you pray, etc so I don't see the problem. I mean this nicely, but if you feel like you wouldn't be able to wrap your brain around the fact that it's a christian hospital, maybe it would be better for everybody if you worked elsewhere? Even at Christian hospitals the most religious thing I've seen is a priest once in a while or a chapel.

You'd care for a patient who wanted to keep his/her rosary in their hands and wanted their prayer cards at their bedside or a person who wanted you to call a priest for them, wouldn't you? I'm assuming you would so working at one of those hospitals wouldn't have any bearing on your beliefs at all (unless you were still unsure of yourself religiously).

xo

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To me, I'd ask the same questions before taking a job at a religious hospital as I would any other hospital. As long as the staffing is decent, the pay and benefits comparable, patient outcomes good, etc I wouldn't have a problem. I mean, unless you're talking about some off-the-wall religion that expected you to participate in sacrificing kittens in the lobby before report, their religious beliefs shouldn't affect you one way or the other. I doubt they'd be worse than some of the corporate beliefs we're supposed to suck up to in non-religious hospitals.

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BSN16 specializes in ICU, trauma.

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I am curious,

So my current catholic based hospital broadcasts a morning and evening prayer to each pt room over an intercom system. However, this hospital cares for a largely diverse population not only ethnically but religiously. Christians, Muslims, atheists and other spiritual or faith based practices.

With all that being said, would any of you consider this inappropriate? Like I definitely understand advocating for a patient to incorporate faith based care, but only if that is what they want.

I understand the good intentions but I'm also a little petty sometimes :sarcastic:

Thoughts?

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186 Posts; 2,507 Profile Views

I'm a Mormon working in a Catholic hospital. We have people of all faiths here, including atheists and it's a very diverse and inclusive environment. It's an awesome employer and I'm proud to work here. They do have prayer twice a day but no one is required to participate. Our chaplains are ecumenical and our patients are asked if they wish to participate in spiritual support when they are admitted. Yes there are crosses in every room and statues all over the place and mass is broadcast to the rooms on Sunday's and religious holidays, but I've never felt uncomfortable. I think most hospitals, even the faith based ones, are very respectful of differing religious views. These days, it's risking legal action not to be. A diverse workforce with respect for individual differences is a healthy workforce. Everyone benefits, including the patients. I honestly think OP that you'd have nothing to worry about as far as feeling uncomfortable if you did choose a faith based facility.

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316 Posts; 7,775 Profile Views

There are plenty of Muslims and Jews who work at my Catholic Hospital. No religious requirements here. In society you people are more guilty of shoving your ideology down the throats of Christians than vice versa. I don't know why you atheists are so afraid to hear the word of God. What are you afraid of ? The Truth?

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BSN16 specializes in ICU, trauma.

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There are plenty of Muslims and Jews who work at my Catholic Hospital. No religious requirements here. In society you people are more guilty of shoving your ideology down the throats of Christians than vice versa. I don't know why you atheists are so afraid to hear the word of God. What are you afraid of ? The Truth?

This topic is not debating one belief over another, MidLifeRN2012.

Not trying to call the pot kettle but you stated "In society "YOU PEOPLE" are more guilty of shoving your ideology down the throats of christians"- then you proceed to tell me i'm afraid of the truth because i'm an atheist?

I'm sure I, along with the OP, and other commenters came to this topic to civilly discuss this with and open mind and an open heart.

Honestly i find your comment very upsetting and unsympathetic. I have never once tried to shove my beliefs down anyone's throat. In fact, probably a few very close friends and my boyfriend know of my religious beliefs, because i'm honestly fearful and ridicule and judgement from others.

That being said, i have prayed with a patient or their family, if that is what THEY want. I will incorporate the faith based care the the client wishes, because it is not about me at that moment, it is about them.

I hope you don't treat your patients with the kind of attitude you just expressed online.

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186 Posts; 2,507 Profile Views

There are plenty of Muslims and Jews who work at my Catholic Hospital. No religious requirements here. In society you people are more guilty of shoving your ideology down the throats of Christians than vice versa. I don't know why you atheists are so afraid to hear the word of God. What are you afraid of ? The Truth?

"you people" What an insensitive terminology. Shouldn't we as a society be way beyond categorizing people into pigeonholes? I'm quite sure the OP is more than an atheist. She's a caring human being who is asking a question. She is in a caring profession and I'm quite sure delivers her care in a respectful and inclusive manner. She deserves respect. Her views may differ from yours but her feelings are every bit as valid as yours or mine.

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186 Posts; 2,507 Profile Views

This topic is not debating one belief over another, MidLifeRN2012.

Not trying to call the pot kettle but you stated "In society "YOU PEOPLE" are more guilty of shoving your ideology down the throats of christians"- then you proceed to tell me i'm afraid of the truth because i'm an atheist?

I'm sure I, along with the OP, and other commenters came to this topic to civilly discuss this with and open mind and an open heart

That being said, i have prayed with a patient or their family, if that is what THEY want. I will incorporate the faith based care the the client wishes, because it is not about me at that moment, it is about them.

I hope you don't treat your patients with the kind of attitude you just expressed online.

we must have been writing at the same time.

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