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Assisting CNA's/not able to do my own work

Posted

Specializes in LTAC,LTC, Med Surg.

I'm a new nurse, just graduated in May and trying to find my niche. At night I take care of 60 patients and their is so much to do. Last night a CNA told me that I would be helping them with changes if the 3rd aide didn't come in. I was told this on another floor this past week by another CNA. How am I supposed to do all of my work-and their is plenty and adequately take care of my residents? I used to be a cna and worked short all the time and I never told the nurses they would be taking a assignment. I know its a hard job and I am not bashing cnas. They are a valuable asset. But I am overloaded on a nightly basis. Who is going to pitch in and help me? NO ONE. I rarely get any breaks cause if I do I won't finish up in time. Maybe its time for me to go back to the hospital. This is so frustrating not being able to be the nurse I'm capable of being. How would you handle this situation? Thanks.

hollyjolly

Specializes in LTAC,LTC, Med Surg.

Sorry, I should have posted on the LTC board.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 14 years experience.

The CNA has no business giving you an assignment, no matter how short they're running on staff.

You are the one with the licensure and ability to delegate. Don't allow them to tell you what to do, because this only yields CNAs who run the floor.

If they give you an assignment, you've got to tactfully put your foot down and refuse. Tell them you'll help after your nursing work is completed. After all, you can help the CNAs with their duties, but they cannot help you with your tasks.

Lovely_RN, MSN

Has 11 years experience.

CNAs are delegating to nurses? Wow things have changed a lot since I was CNA

joprasklpn

Specializes in pediatric and geriatric. Has 19 years experience.

I really know what you mean. I now do peds homecare because LTC just about drove me insane after awhile. I also worked nights and was expected to help the aides when they were short. I think it depends on the facility. I would ask your supervisor or DON if this is common practice or maybe the aides are pulling one over on you. I think 3 aides could handle rounds on 60 residents just fine.

noc4senuf

Specializes in Geriatrics, WCC.

Some of the others have said it quite nicely. Do not let the CNA's tell you (as a licensed nurse) what your job is. Tell them that if you have time, you will help them but, your work is important too and they can't help you with that. If you allow them to push your buttons, it will only continue.

nghtfltguy, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, Trauma, Flight.

exactly~~~

also.... keep in mind what CNA stands for...

they are there to assist you...

you can assist them after you have done YOUR work.....

don't let them bully you around ... they will cause you are new....

don't let them...but @ the same time... be nice to them... you need them..

:cool:

LTC Lady

Specializes in Long Term Care/Mental Health.

Holly,

I too am a new nurse who stepped into a Nursing Managment Position. My first week on the floor i had assistive personal trying to dictate to me what i was going to do to help them because they were working short. It was hard, but i had to put my foot down and let them know that i would help them if i had the chance after MY work was done. I understand that it is tough especially if you are working with CNAs who are older then you, or who have been there for years. But as the others have said you have to do it. You are the licensed staff member who has a regulatory body to answer too. Thier work is important but yours has to come first. Good luck with this and keep us posted! :)

PsychNurseWannaBe, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych, LTC, Nursing Management, WCC. Has 7 years experience.

It can be such a touchy situation. Obviously you want to help, but like the OP said, who is going to help you do your nursing duties?

I had a float CNA come onto my floor. She wanted help toileting someone and asked me to help. I said normally I would; however, this resident is not a simple transfer and will take easily 20 - 25 minutes to do and that I am getting behind with my med pass because of more pressing concerns. So I told her that I will find another aide to help her. She then proceeded to say...what, you can't lift? I re-explained why I would like to get another aide to help her. She continued saying...why, because you can't lift. She said it like three times. I was like, "Look! I already explained several times why I am trying to find someone else to help you. There are 4 other aides on this unit". I was told a day or two later that she was making comments that she "isn't used to working with nurses who won't help the aides". Ohhh... I was slightly annoyed by that. And by the way I found another aide and it did take them 25 minutes to transfer the resident.

Sometimes it feels like a no-win situation.

I'm a new nurse, just graduated in May and trying to find my niche. At night I take care of 60 patients and their is so much to do. Last night a CNA told me that I would be helping them with changes if the 3rd aide didn't come in. I was told this on another floor this past week by another CNA. How am I supposed to do all of my work-and their is plenty and adequately take care of my residents? I used to be a cna and worked short all the time and I never told the nurses they would be taking a assignment. I know its a hard job and I am not bashing cnas. They are a valuable asset. But I am overloaded on a nightly basis. Who is going to pitch in and help me? NO ONE. I rarely get any breaks cause if I do I won't finish up in time. Maybe its time for me to go back to the hospital. This is so frustrating not being able to be the nurse I'm capable of being. How would you handle this situation? Thanks.

I know EXACTLY how you feel - when I was new nurse my aides pushed me around. Forunately I usually worked with a very experienced aide who was able to help teach to walk the fine line between directed my aides and being a big old (ahem)... well you know.

However, the fact is - you need them - but you are in charge. ALL responsibility is yours - you answer for everything that happens on your unit.

You need to politely - and professionally take your aide to the side and explain that you'll help her if you have time, but you have to do your work to. Also, you should have an on-call supervisor - if you are short - call them. They might find someone to come in early, or might come in themselves.

As a side note - go job shopping if you're overworked and stressed. I know all LTC places are understaffed, but each company is different in how they assign duties and such - it never hurts to shop around. I was very surprised at how much the work load differed from place to place.

gale54

Specializes in acute care LTC.

Do Not let a CNA tell you what to do !!!! YOU are the charge nurse, you can not let them push you around. You must delagate the to them what is expected to be done. Help if only if you can, you have enough to do. Don't quit LTC, but staffing is that bad often i would find a place with better staffing. That is a bad place to be, I have 31 residents with 1.5-2 CNA's for 11-7 (total or 60 resident's; 2 Charge Nurses; and 3-4 CNA's) If staffing stays that poor RUN!!!:uhoh21:

jess1018

Specializes in Labor and Delivery.

i kind of think this cna is doing this because you are new maybe? Still very wrong.

ChanceORiley27 "My aides", Take your aides to the side" Wow did they bring back slavery? It's a wonder to me that LTC's can find CNA's willing to work for them. I'm not sure if their that desperate or just plain stupid? I left LTC and went back to school to become a PCT. I work in critical care and would never go back to the degrading work of a LTC nursing assistant. My advice to CNA's , get out of LTC. You can find employment in hospitals, home care, doctor's offices. You don't have to waste away in LTC being treated like a second class citizen.

ChanceORiley27 "My aides", Take your aides to the side" Wow did they bring back slavery? It's a wonder to me that LTC's can find CNA's willing to work for them. I'm not sure if their that desperate or just plain stupid? I left LTC and went back to school to become a PCT. I work in critical care and would never go back to the degrading work of a LTC nursing assistant. My advice to CNA's , get out of LTC. You can find employment in hospitals, home care, doctor's offices. You don't have to waste away in LTC being treated like a second class citizen.

trying to stir something up, are we? lol.....many of us use the term "my aides" no ownership implied...just meaning the ones working on my floor/wing.....

Well nurse, no offense but I wouldn't have to try hard to "stir" things up in LTC. My post was geared more towards any CNA that happened to stumble across this thread. Just to let them know there are places that are willing to give them some amount of respect. Great example, "I think 3 aides could handle rounds on 60 residents just fine." Sure we can, like working a cattle line. Here's another good one, "also.... keep in mind what CNA stands for..." Yup Certified nursing assistant, it means assisting with your job which includes patient care.

noc4senuf

Specializes in Geriatrics, WCC.

mid2348, you may have left a message for another CNA but, you are posting on the LTC: DON/ADON forum. I'm not sure how many others are looking here. Morte did make a good comment when referring the "my". The NHA does it in our facility when speakng about any staff... me included others also, including CNA's when referring to nurses, residents etc. I did not see anything wrong with it.

You seemed to lump all LTC in one pile. There are many facilities out there where their staff are appreciated greatly. I'm sorry you happened to find a facility that did not.

BoopetteRN

Specializes in LTC since 1972, team leader, supervisor,.

At times CNAs can make the job stressful. I have always found that telling them upfront that they are my eyes and ears for resident care is important, and that I would never ask them to do anything I could not or would not do myself, but, I have got my job to do. In an emergency, helping is ok, but being told to do it by a CNA is something else. Most CNAs see nurses sitting at the station doing nothing, not realizing that the work we do is important, again that goes to show the a little knowledge can be dangerous. The other thing I have always done is give them expectations of what I expect from them and menor and coach them if there are problems. Best wishes to you, hope all goes better

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