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Anyone regret leaving the clinic for remote job?

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by PirateNurse06 PirateNurse06 (New) New Nurse

Has 15 years experience.

I would like to hear from fellow nurses who have left the ambulatory/clinic world and switched to a remote (work at home) position.  What are the cons?  Any regrets? Thanks!

ivyleaf

Specializes in Ambulatory Case Management, Clinic, Psychiatry. Has 14 years experience.

Short answer: definitely no regrets.

Long answer:

My last job was as a float nurse (both direct patient care and case management) for an outpatient  clinic group. 2 years ago I started a job as an outpatient case manager & manager for medicaid members w/behavioral health issues. My job was originally in the office, but due to COVID I have been 95% remote since late March. I love it. I am an introvert though, like to manage my own time/plan my day, have my own space, minimal interruptions. If you are very social/extroverted it may be difficult.

Cons: in the time of covid at least, you don't leave your house much. 

Absolutely no regrets, im hoping to stay mostly remote in the future

Lvnlyfe2016, LPN, LVN

Specializes in Rehabilitation, Home Health, Agency Nursing. Has 5 years experience.

I recently switched to remote working and I will be honest. I have absolutely no regrets. I have time to get up in the morning, grab my coffee, clean my face and get ready. I like the flexibility of taking my breaks when needed, cook lunch or dinner when I get a chance, and once I clock out, I'm already in my home. Truly a blessing. You will have no regrets!

jeanbeth, MSN, DNP, RN

Specializes in Gerontology, Education. Has 9 years experience.

Absolutely no regrets

PirateNurse06

Has 15 years experience.

Thanks for the responses.  I'm very excited and feel blessed to have this opportunity!

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 51 years experience.

Love it. Never, ever going back. 

What types of jobs are you all doing remotely? Did you stay with your current company, or go elsewhere? Do your companies provide the computer equipment?

Edited by 2BS Nurse
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Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 51 years experience.

I have done both. The best result came when I took a very deep cleansing breath and dived into birthing my own nurse consultant business. Sure it was scary— nothing in our nursing education ever prepared me for this. On the other hand, everything I’ve done in nursing has been excellent preparation for being self-employed.
Like what? 
To start with, everything you have picked up that makes you useful as a resource to others in your current work. Do you help orient people, telling and showing them how to function in a role? Do you try to think of better ways to do that, and seek out learning opportunities like journals, online classes, conference offerings, networking? Honestly now, are you pretty good at what you do and see how to apply old knowledge to different problems? Somebody out there needs you to do it for them, likely a lot of somebodies.
Then there’s the attitudinal part. Do you approach a completely new job with interest and excitement tempered with a little apprehension? That’s good, because those both alert your brain to up its game to notice and learn from novel ideas and situations. 
Then there’s the nuts and bolts, which you can learn. Things like good practices for keeping a home office, computer programs that streamline your time and planning needs, best ideas for getting the word out (also known as that scary word “marketing”),  I.e., getting comfortable with blowing your own horn. Learn who can take the burden of figuring out things you don’t want to waste your time on and why you really, really want to do that, like the friendly tax prep folks who work year round and not just for April 15 (or May this year, apparently). Meet the wonderful volunteer folks at SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) whose mission in life is to teach people like you how to start up and keep going. Join the professional org(s) of other nurses (the national org of nurses in business is there for you!)  and enjoy learning from them.
I’ve deliberately kept these ideas open-ended so you can noodle about the specifics. Just trust me on this, if you’re a good nurse you have a ton of transferable skills to bring to this. Real skills like organization, self-directedness, communication, and human relations (not task-based stuff that students call skills like sinking an NG or placing a Foley). 

Think about it! Have fun! 

On 3/28/2021 at 7:01 AM, Hannahbanana said:

I have done both. The best result came when I took a very deep cleansing breath and dived into birthing my own nurse consultant business. Sure it was scary— nothing in our nursing education ever prepared me for this. On the other hand, everything I’ve done in nursing has been excellent preparation for being self-employed.
Like what? 
To start with, everything you have picked up that makes you useful as a resource to others in your current work. Do you help orient people, telling and showing them how to function in a role? Do you try to think of better ways to do that, and seek out learning opportunities like journals, online classes, conference offerings, networking? Honestly now, are you pretty good at what you do and see how to apply old knowledge to different problems? Somebody out there needs you to do it for them, likely a lot of somebodies.
Then there’s the attitudinal part. Do you approach a completely new job with interest and excitement tempered with a little apprehension? That’s good, because those both alert your brain to up its game to notice and learn from novel ideas and situations. 
Then there’s the nuts and bolts, which you can learn. Things like good practices for keeping a home office, computer programs that streamline your time and planning needs, best ideas for getting the word out (also known as that scary word “marketing”),  I.e., getting comfortable with blowing your own horn. Learn who can take the burden of figuring out things you don’t want to waste your time on and why you really, really want to do that, like the friendly tax prep folks who work year round and not just for April 15 (or May this year, apparently). Meet the wonderful volunteer folks at SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives) whose mission in life is to teach people like you how to start up and keep going. Join the professional org(s) of other nurses (the national org of nurses in business is there for you!)  and enjoy learning from them.
I’ve deliberately kept these ideas open-ended so you can noodle about the specifics. Just trust me on this, if you’re a good nurse you have a ton of transferable skills to bring to this. Real skills like organization, self-directedness, communication, and human relations (not task-based stuff that students call skills like sinking an NG or placing a Foley). 

Think about it! Have fun! 

What types of jobs are you doing with your consulting?

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 51 years experience.

Legal nurse consulting (see www.aalnc.org ) and nurse life care planning (www.aanlcp.org ) If you have been active in clinical care for several years, you probably know a great deal that attorneys are willing to pay you for. It’s very gratifying to be valued in that way. And the money is very good. 
 

Happy to discuss and show samples to give you an idea. I’m on the cusp of retiring now, and no financial interest in the offer, LOL. I’m mentoring a couple of incoming nurse life care planners just for fun. 

syronrs14, ADN, BSN

Specializes in wound care, home health. Has 7 years experience.

@Hannahbanana

How does one become a nurse life care planner?

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 51 years experience.

Check the American Association of Nurse Life Care Planners at www.aanlcp.org for information. Feel free to PM me if you need more.