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Am I being snotty?

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Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

. I believe the reasoning for most hospitals for not having credentials on the name bands have more to do with family and patients requesting only BSN or higher credentials nursing staff. Our hospital rewards us in others ways ( by monetary stipends) for extra certifications, education, etc.

OK, I've wiped up the coffee I just spit out.

Up here the family/patient would get ripped a new one by the Nurse Managers if they ever pulled that. An RN is an RN, just as an LPN is an LPN. Degree entry is the only way to obtain the title RN (and yes, we still have a large number of hospital and college trained RNs working) and the LPN is a two year college diploma. Without passing the national exam, you basically have useless qualifications.

I know one manager who told a patient's family that they should be grateful to have a NURSE at the bedside to care for them. But hey we have universal healthcare, so no one is left out.

I don't think it's snotty at all. :) And I am an ADN nurse.

That being said, I will tell you that I was taking report from a coworker the other evening, and she made a comment about, "I don't know whether she got her xyz med, because so-and-so was supposed to give it.. because of course I can't push IV meds.."

For a second I was SO confused, but then realized- duuh- she's an LPN.. and I had never even noticed it on her badge. Must not be something I notice, apparently. ;)

edit: well- that, or it's a terrible indication as to the sharpness of my assessment skills. LOL.

My greater concern would be having my full first and last name on the front of my badge. In some areas, that is a safety risk.

And AMEN to that. We do not have last names, and if we did I would not have it. In school, they always kept our first/last names on our badges, but we were often encouraged to put tape over our last names during clinicals.

tri-rn

Specializes in MICU/SICU.

I don't have BSN on my badge...but if/when I ever get my CCRN, you BET that'll go on there :)

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I will sign RN,BSN

Interesting point. How many do or plan to do this? I don't.

Perpetual Student

Specializes in PACU. Has 4+ years experience.

Interesting point. How many do or plan to do this? I don't.

When I finish my BSN program I won't add the BSN to my signature. I'm way too lazy for that. My hand cramps up from all of the writing I have to do anyway, adding 3 letters what seems like a million times per day would just make it worse.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 34 years experience.

When I finish my BSN program I won't add the BSN to my signature. I'm way too lazy for that. My hand cramps up from all of the writing I have to do anyway, adding 3 letters what seems like a million times per day would just make it worse.

I don't think I would want to be writing 5 letters after my name all day long, either. As it is, the letters have degenerated over the years to a kind of wavy-line looking thing. :)

Moogie

Specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

Am I being snotty? I am a new grad and I have been working at my hospital for the past 10 weeks. Next week I will be finished with orientation. I am considering paying the $15 to have my ID badge redone to reflect my degree. Security put my First and Last name, RN on my badge. I didn't think anything of it until recently when some of my coworkers asked me about my degree. Since the comment I have noticed that the nurses with advanced degrees have it reflected on their badges.

I don't believe that having a BSN makes me any better a nurse than someone with an RN, but at the same time I would like to be recognized for all the hard work I did to earn my degree.

Any feedback?

I don't think you're being snotty; however, if other nurses who have BSNs have it on their name tags, you won't get any questions or anyone thinking you're being a snob. If the only advanced degree nurses who have their educational level on their tags are those with MSNs or higher, I'd leave it alone.

Or just leave it alone until you either lose your name tag (done that!) or something and you have to get a replacement.

Do you have a school pin that you can wear to work? I always liked the pin because it told a little story about the nurse's educational background. I used to wear both my ADN and BSN pins. Oh, and BTW, :up: on the new job!

chaxanmom

Has 2 years experience.

Am I being snotty? I am a new grad and I have been working at my hospital for the past 10 weeks. Next week I will be finished with orientation. I am considering paying the $15 to have my ID badge redone to reflect my degree. Security put my First and Last name, RN on my badge. I didn't think anything of it until recently when some of my coworkers asked me about my degree. Since the comment I have noticed that the nurses with advanced degrees have it reflected on their badges.

I don't believe that having a BSN makes me any better a nurse than someone with an RN, but at the same time I would like to be recognized for all the hard work I did to earn my degree.

Any feedback?

I would pay to have it put on. We worked our tails off for our BSNs and your ID should show it. I think it's very appropriate if your hospital has degrees on badges.

HeatwaveRN

Specializes in Cardiac ICU. Has 10 years experience.

HAH! I did the same thing and also thought about if I'm being snotty. It's something that I'm proud to have and worked my tush off. It's not to undermine anyone. I had my badge changed because it only said RN.

tewdles, RN

Specializes in PICU, NICU, L&D, Public Health, Hospice. Has 31 years experience.

I guess that I don't find any correlation between what a name badge says and "snotty". In my mind..."snotty" would describe attitude or action rather than appearance...and a name badge is simply appearance.

Your name badge should list whatever credentials you prefer.

I got my pic changed because I needed a new dye job in the old one. Of course my new one actually looks worse!

EricJRN, MSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 15 years experience.

I don't have much of an opinion one way or the other on this specific situation, but I once had a non-nurse point out to me that nurses are just about the only professionals that would include an undergrad degree in their titles or signatures. I think that's interesting.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 34 years experience.

I don't have much of an opinion one way or the other on this specific situation, but I once had a non-nurse point out to me that nurses are just about the only professionals that would include an undergrad degree in their titles or signatures. I think that's interesting.

It's also interesting how two threads on the same issue can be so different. We had one a while back where quite a number of the posts, at least half from people with a BSN or higher-- thought it was pretentious and unnecessary to put a bachelors degree on a name tag. It was quite a lively discussion. In that case, though, the nurse had become very angry, abruptly left orientation and refused to work at that hospital because they just put "RN" on the RN badges.

Moogie

Specializes in Gerontology, nursing education.

I don't have much of an opinion one way or the other on this specific situation, but I once had a non-nurse point out to me that nurses are just about the only professionals that would include an undergrad degree in their titles or signatures. I think that's interesting.

Good point; however, I wonder if the non-nurse realized that nursing is one of the few professions in which a bachelor's degree is not a prerequisite for licensure.

Lucky0220

Specializes in Med/Surg, Acute Rehab. Has 4 years experience.

I don't have much of an opinion one way or the other on this specific situation, but I once had a non-nurse point out to me that nurses are just about the only professionals that would include an undergrad degree in their titles or signatures. I think that's interesting.

I think that might be because you can be called a "nurse", regardless of whether you have your LVN, your ADN, or your BSN. MSN's typically have another title. At least that is how it seems to me. Where I work, no matter what your degree is, it's only your first name and then RN, or LVN. But I can understand the OP wanting BSN on her badge if the other nurse's badges reflect their degrees. JMHO

Not snotty but it seems you didn't care for it until you saw what other nurses had...I would let it be I honestly don't see how having a BSN on your badge is all that important.. what matters is that you are an RN. I feel patients don't look at that stuff anyway (degree type) it's more of nurses competing and showing off with other nurses.

My 2cents.

Btw I have a BSN (putting it out there for the smart comments I will probably get) :nurse:

**All Heart RN**

Specializes in Cardiac.

Good point; however, I wonder if the non-nurse realized that nursing is one of the few professions in which a bachelor's degree is not a prerequisite for licensure.

Good point!