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Am I an idiot for choosing the BSN route rather than the ADN...?

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lee_sHAY lee_sHAY (Member)

I always had dreams of attending a professional school (medical, dental, law, business, future studies in Nursing etc.) so I had decided to select the BSN route rather than the ADN. However, some students from my community college are criticizing my decision as they state that I am paying too much for a Nursing Degree in contrast with with them. Financially, I have no problems paying, I have the Montgomery G.I. bill, financial aid, savings, and won every scholarship offered for my major. I begin at UC Irvine this fall in September. They keep calling me an idiot by pursuing a BSN.

I have recently discovered that ADN nurses have their Bachelor's paid for by the hospital while they work. However, my parents (both physicians) have said since the state of California is in the brink of a financial meltdown and are deeply broke, hospital administration staff are cutting back on funds and are no longer paying it. Is there some truth to that at all or are my parents just using that as a scare tactic to woo me towards a higher degree level?

I want to attend graduate school of some kind and I was scared that the hospitals were no longer financially assisting nurses in their pursuit for a Bachelor's, were these good reasons in pursuing the BSN rather than the ADN?

P.S.: I also wanted to live the "college life," instead of just commuting back and forth to my CC.

Edited by lee_sHAY
puncuation mistake

Go ahead and finish up your Bsn degree. As you have already stated you have the G.I. bill at your disposal, so make the most of it. I do not see the point of them criticizing you about your decision one bit. If you sit down and do a pro's vs. con's list you will easily see that the route you are going will probably be the most effecient way of doing things. First of all, when you graduate with your Bsn you will be more marketable than your counterparts with an Adn degree. Next, you have the GI bill and you don't have the same worry that everyone else has, How am i going to pay for school? So, why does it matter if you become a Adn nurse first? I am assuming your friends in whom you communicate with are lacking the funds and for that reason are trying to seek tuition reimbursement through employment at a hospital. You are not in the same position where you need tuition reimbursement. The only con, in this whole equation is that you will lose out on 2 years of real life experiences working as a nurse and two years of a nurse's salary. Do i believe you are going the wrong route absolutely not. I will ad my two cents to this thread though. I truly believe if you are not going for a masters degree at some point going for your bachelors is slightly over kill. I see education as a progression and the more education you acquire the more money you should make. As you may know a Adn nurse makes the same as a Bsn nurse, so my humble opinion is to go get your masters at some point and make the most out of your nursing career. Also, tell your Adn friends to **** mind their own business and do you. This message is approved by your soon to be Adn student.

I would trust my parents/family more than my "friends". In fact, your parents are 100% correct about the BSN route. It is so hard to find a job with an ADN degree, and worst if you have zero experience. Every time I look for job positions, they always put BSN preferred OR required. I'd say go for your BSN and get it done asap. Goodluck!

NurseVoldemort, BSN, RN

Specializes in ED. Has 13 years experience.

Sounds like you have some jelous people in your life...

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Sure, a lot of hospitals will pay for the RN-BSN...if you can get hired in the first place :) It's hard for new grads of all types to get work. A lot of job markets favor BSNs and since you're getting a lot of the bill footed, go for it! I would have gone straight for the BSN had I been able to afford it.

KeepItRealRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in CVICU. Has 28 years experience.

If you can afford it and you want the college life, then go for it. Sounds like you have that taken care of. If you were taking out tens of thousands of dollars out in student loans to do it then you're friends at the CC might be worth listening to.

Tait, MSN, RN

Specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Prof Practice. Has 13 years experience.

As much as I love and support ADN's (as I am one myself) it is getting harder and harder for anyone to get a job at this point. I say give yourself as much of a leg up as you can with your BSN and let the rest of them fester.

Best of luck!

Tait

chicookie, BSN, RN

Specializes in Peds Hem, Onc, Med/Surg. Has 8 years experience.

Am I an idiot for choosing the BSN route rather than the ADN?

Who the crap is making you think that way? They obviously have no idea what they are talking about. I took the ADN route then my BSN and it was A)A waste of valuable time that could have been applied to Grad school and B) a waste of money as the majority of classes were almost the same classes as the ADN program and its money that could have gone towards Grad school. If I could do it again I would go straight for my BSN. (I could have been almost done with Grad school by now.The BSN program was an extra year on top of the 4 for the ADN program..GRR)

Tell your ADN friends that they are just jealous and when you can take it easy they have to go back to school. Lets face it, those new to the nursing field sooner of later will have to get their BSN. My hospital for example will not hire anyone that does not their BSN, connection or not.

People who don't know what they are talking about need to shut up! *gets off soapbox*

workingspaz

Specializes in m/s.

since money and time are not a pressing factor, you've done your homework and have your head on right. go for the BSN. many hospitals aren't hiring new ADN grads without experience. to each their own. i did ADN first, and are now goind back to get my BSN.... so far my job will reinburse but that's now and who can say what will happen in the future? best of luck and enjoy school!

iteachob, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB, NICU, Nursing Education (academic).

No, you are definitely not an idiot!

The generic BSN route is much more streamlined and makes a whole lot more sense (IMO) than the 2+2 option. Not only that, but so many who have the intention of completing their BSN either never do, or complete it many years down the road.

By the way, I teach in an ADN program with a RN-BSN completion option. Not all ADN grads can even get into our RN to BSN program....they have to have at least a 3.0 GPA. Feel confident in the route you have chosen.

OhioCCRN, MSN, NP

Specializes in SICU. Has 9 years experience.

I think you should definitely go for your BSN as that is where the wind seems to be blowing.

It is good that you have all the grants and scholarships covering your education.

Getting a BSN is a good idea. However, as one poster pointed out, getting a job in this economy is not guaranteed even for BSN new grads..

Make sure if you need to take out additional loans, they are prudent and can be paid off..

Remember, RN's start out at about ~$24 (speaking strictly about Ohio) so if you take out ~$70,000 in school loans, it doesnt balance out and/or break even.

these are:

my :twocents:

my opinion....

In reality both are good choices; it all depends on one’s personal situation. So neither one should be saying to the other you are making a bad choice. It sounds like you are doing some wise planning. I do question some of the people going to private bsn’s schools for the tune of $60,000 or more all on student loans, but it is their choice.

workingmama77, BSN

Has 7 years experience.

I know if I could afford it and my schedule allowed it (married, 2 kids & a job) I would definitely have gone the BSN route instead of going for my Associate's degree first. I am going to have to go for my ADN first and then my BSN. You are smart and doing the right thing in my book.

Your decision to get a BSN at the start of your career is a sound one. The only thing you might plan differently would be to take lower division and prerequisite courses for about two years at the cc, then transfer them in to the four year school. You could be saving money and it might be convenient if you live closer to a cc. These are the only reasons to attend a cc rather than go to the four year school.

chicago_RN

Specializes in Med-surg, NICU.

Like you, I wanted to go to a 4 year school for the college experience. I know for some people that's not important, but I wouldn't trade those 4 years for anything. Plus I met my husband in college. I think you're doing a good thing:)

Otessa, BSN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

I always had dreams of attending a professional school (medical, dental, law, business, future studies in Nursing etc.) so I had decided to select the BSN route rather than the ADN. However, some students from my community college are criticizing my decision as they state that I am paying too much for a Nursing Degree in contrast with with them. Financially, I have no problems paying, I have the Montgomery G.I. bill, financial aid, savings, and won every scholarship offered for my major. I begin at UC Irvine this fall in September. They keep calling me an idiot by pursuing a BSN.

I have recently discovered that ADN nurses have their Bachelor's paid for by the hospital while they work. However, my parents (both physicians) have said since the state of California is in the brink of a financial meltdown and are deeply broke, hospital administration staff are cutting back on funds and are no longer paying it. Is there some truth to that at all or are my parents just using that as a scare tactic to woo me towards a higher degree level?

I want to attend graduate school of some kind and I was scared that the hospitals were no longer financially assisting nurses in their pursuit for a Bachelor's, were these good reasons in pursuing the BSN rather than the ADN?

P.S.: I also wanted to live the "college life," instead of just commuting back and forth to my CC.

If you wan to pursue a graduate degree in the future a BSN is the right route and also have the opportunity for 'college life', we all make choices for many different reasons-be happy with your choices.

eriksoln, BSN, RN

Specializes in M/S, Travel Nursing, Pulmonary. Has 15 years experience.

If you can afford it, I don't see how its a bad decision. That'd be the only thing I'd be worried about, being able to afford it. Beyond that.................why not get it out of the way?

Me, I had to go the ADN route because of financial restraints. I had been planning on getting my BSN but, you know how it is...........something always comes up. For awhile there, I actually had changed my mind about it even.

I've heard more than a few ADN to BSN nurses say the classes were "fluff" and that you didn't do anything but write papers. I've put it out there, asking how a BSN can help you with bedside nursing..............and I never got a concrete answer to the question.

With that said, I came up with my own reasons to go back to school. First and foremost, I want my MSN in Informatics. I think its a job I can do later in life. Secondly, I think I'll have a little bit more of a voice about nursing and I'll have a more well defined opinion of what nursing is/should be from the classes. Whether or not any of the secondary things become true or make a difference is yet to be determined.

Then, you have the final reason for getting the BSN: Job security. There are many many opinions about what the furture of nursing holds. Some say LPNs will be "phased out", others say the same about ADNs, and of course there is the crowd that thinks BSN or MSN will have their administrative roles taken away.

IDK who is right or wrong. I notice some trends (LPN's being hired by LTC facilities again it seems, at least in my area, ADNs doing strictly bedside care, BSNs also doing bedside but opportunity to do things away from the unit exist.............some hospitals only hiring BSNs for bedside), but I don't have a crystal ball. I know I'd feel more secure in finding a job if I had a BSN..............so I'm getting one.

NYLady

Specializes in CCU, L&D, Home Care, Research, Holistic. Has 30 years experience.

You are making the right decision. When you do start working, you can use the tuition benefit (assuming there is one) toward grad school. By the way, do your friends know they will be required to pay taxes on that tuition benefit?

I completed my education the long way, starting with a 3-year diploma program. It was fantastic and I was confident of my skills and could have been in charge of a unit when I finished but it took forever to finally reach graduate school. When I finished a Masters and wanted to go on for a Doctorate I was toast...just couldn't justify that many more years in school...so I stopped after receiving a Masters from Columbia University. If you start with the BSN you will be at least three years ahead of where I was...