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allnurses Ebola Preparedness Survey Makes the News.

Posted

Specializes in Peds, Med-Surg, Disaster Nsg, Parish Nsg.

For those who participated in the Ebola Preparedness survey, your voices are being heard.

In a survey of more than 3,000 nurses across the country, more than 70 percent say they are unprepared to deal with the Ebola crisis. The survey was conducted by allnurses.com after a nurse contracted the disease in Texas from contact with an infected patient.

Ebola is quickly becoming one of the more important stories in the world news. For nurses, the most frightening aspect may be the lack of preparation. More than 70 percent of staff members said they still hadn't spoken about the issue with their nurses.

However, most nurses do feel like there are solutions to these problems. Only about 7 percent didn't know what would be helpful with the threat or reality of Ebola. Almost a third thought "better communication about preparedness at [their] facility" could help them. Even more helpful, according to the allnurses.com survey, would be "Live (in-person) training sessions or practice drills," which over 40 percent thought would aid the most.

Even though these resources aren't being provided now, most nurses surveyed still believe there are ways to be better informed, and to better help their patients.

Nurses Say They are Unprepared to Deal with Ebola

AOL Original October 14, 2014


Here is a segment of another news story published in the MedCity News.

Responding almost immediately to the news of the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola - the first person to do so within the U.S. - nurses across the country are adding to the growing chorus of concern over how hospitals and front-line healthcare workers deal with any possible exposure.

The "vast majority" of nurses nationwide "don't feel prepared or safe" for treating any such patient, according to a recent survey of 3,000 nurses from allnurses.com.

For the full story, go to:

Majority of nurses, front-line health workers 'don't feel prepared' for Ebola

Edited by tnbutterfly

gypsyd8

Specializes in TELE, CVU, ICU. Has 10+ years experience.

Funny, after this made the news we were assured that our facility was working on it.

nor902

Has 30 years experience.

I think each city should have a protocol and stockpile of necessary supplies and go to person. In our city we have 3 large hospitals plus a VA. I think that only 1 should be designated to receive these patients (hopefully it will not come to that) with trained teams.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

I'm proud that nurses are finally supporting each other and letting the backstabbing, ADN vs BSN, and "my unit is cooler than your unit" mentality take a backseat. It's about time. Let's see what movement we can get going and keep going. It doesn't matter if a nurse is an ADN versus a BSN, or what school they went to or where they work. We are all in this together because it's all we have. The news media and facilities are quick to blame the nurse. Well, lets get the TRUTH out there.

Rant over..

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Nurses get to speak!

This is WONDERFUL news and an important unity to have the media focus on what nurses actually do and face; unfortunately, it had to a take an infectious disease to show how a percentage of hospitals only care about the bottom line and are not up to par. :no:

I hope we, as nurses, can keep pushing these issues to the forefront beyond Ebola, and effectively make change, we owe it to ourselves and our patients. :yes:

Edited by LadyFree28

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Maybe the next nurse costume at the Halloween store won't be a short, sexy dress with boobs hanging out, but a hazmat suit... ;)

Edited by tokmom

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 45 years experience.

Allnurses is by far the best place to take the pulse (haha) of the nursing community as a whole. My own feeling...sure reporters go ahead and call the ANA but we're the real voice of nursing!

tnbutterfly - Mary, BSN, RN

Specializes in Peds, Med-Surg, Disaster Nsg, Parish Nsg.

Brian has worked hard to get the voices of "real nurses" out there. The results of the survey clearly reflect the opinions of, not only allnurses.com, but all nurses everywhere.

1KoolRN

Specializes in Rehab, Med/Surg. Has 1 1/2 years experience.

It's about time nurses are respected and regarded as having a powerful impact on the health and safety of our country ~ Hopefully, now, nurses will have the opportunity to participate in a collaborative global care plan (ha!)

I'm proud that nurses are finally supporting each other and letting the backstabbing, ADN vs BSN, and "my unit is cooler than your unit" mentality take a backseat. It's about time. Let's see what movement we can get going and keep going. It doesn't matter if a nurse is an ADN versus a BSN, or what school they went to or where they work. We are all in this together because it's all we have. The news media and facilities are quick to blame the nurse. Well, lets get the TRUTH out there.

Rant over..

Please don't forget to add LPN into that. I tried defending nurses & advocating for more education in comments on boards (CNN, huffington post etc) and I was told to "Shut up because I'm only a Little Pretend Nurse and I was not allowed to speak as a nurse because I wasn't a ®eal (N)urse"

- It honestly really hurt my feelings (I know I need a thicker skin) but it stung. And quite a few people agreed with the person who said that. I went to an accredited school, graduated with great grades,and received a practical nursing diploma. In September I took the nclex, passed and received my nursing license from the N.Y state BON. My amazing RN teacher(s) always drilled into our head not to be bullied by the above statements (if anything we were "low paid nurses") but far from "pretend", and they taught us a curriculum that is still unmatched by any other LPN program.

-I'm sorry, for getting carried away, I know this is way bigger than my feeling insulted. However, please don't forget about us too. We support you, and I wish and was hoping all the nurses could come together and unite right now.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Please don't forget to add LPN into that. I tried defending nurses & advocating for more education in comments on boards (CNN, huffington post etc) and I was told to "Shut up because I'm only a Little Pretend Nurse and I was not allowed to speak as a nurse because I wasn't a ®eal (N)urse"

- It honestly really hurt my feelings (I know I need a thicker skin) but it stung. And quite a few people agreed with the person who said that. I went to an accredited school, graduated with great grades,and received a practical nursing diploma. In September I took the nclex, passed and received my nursing license from the N.Y state BON. My amazing RN teacher(s) always drilled into our head not to be bullied by the above statements (if anything we were "low paid nurses") but far from "pretend", and they taught us a curriculum that is still unmatched by any other LPN program.

-I'm sorry, for getting carried away, I know this is way bigger than my feeling insulted. However, please don't forget about us too. We support you, and I wish and was hoping all the nurses could come together and unite right now.

Of course LPN's are nurses. I was one for four years prior to my ADN.

I only mentioned the ADN vs BSN because there are 2,196.5 posts on the subject on AN.

It's nice to see them disappear for awhile.

Add I said, we are ALL in this together

Please don't forget to add LPN into that. I tried defending nurses & advocating for more education in comments on boards (CNN, huffington post etc) and I was told to "Shut up because I'm only a Little Pretend Nurse and I was not allowed to speak as a nurse because I wasn't a ®eal (N)urse"

I am a BSN. You have my support. I was never an LPN, but I have held both subordinate and supervisory roles to those of LPNs. I wouldn't, personally, tolerate listening to anyone degrade an LPN based only upon that LPNs title.

I think: If you are passionate about something, like you are about this topic, you have to keep chipping away at it whenever you can -- like you did here. It makes a difference.

Edited by UnaNayeli
I'm a grammar OCD - type person!

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

Dr Gavin Macgregor-Skinner has been speaking out about the need for a national training program for Ebola and that the CDC has got it wrong with the instructions that a gown, mask and goggles is enough. He flat out said it is unsafe and that all the skin needs to be covered and they need a buddy system where another coworker watches everything they do and a way to decontaminate them if they make a mistake. There has been nothing about this mentioned in Dallas. Whereas there was a video about Emory hospital that used a buddy system and decontamination before and after taking care of the patient and the buddy was watching the nurse at all times. I can't get the clips but you can do a google search about Dr Skinner and Ebola and see a couple videos from CNN. If somebody is more computer savy maybe they could attach the clips.

1KoolRN

Specializes in Rehab, Med/Surg. Has 1 1/2 years experience.

Dr Gavin Macgregor-Skinner has been speaking out about the need for a national training program for Ebola and that the CDC has got it wrong with the instructions that a gown, mask and goggles is enough. He flat out said it is unsafe and that all the skin needs to be covered and they need a buddy system where another coworker watches everything they do and a way to decontaminate them if they make a mistake. There has been nothing about this mentioned in Dallas. Whereas there was a video about Emory hospital that used a buddy system and decontamination before and after taking care of the patient and the buddy was watching the nurse at all times. I can't get the clips but you can do a google search about Dr Skinner and Ebola and see a couple videos from CNN. If somebody is more computer savy maybe they could attach the clips.

From another thread...

https://allnurses.com/showthread.php?t=954177

and here's the video that's also in that thread...

Nurses show how they prepare to treat Ebola patients:

http://www.wcnc.com/story/news/health/2014/10/14/nurses-show-how-they-prepare-to-treat-ebola-patients/17272963/

Edited by 1KoolRN

I can just see it now, administration taking advantage of an overabundance of nurses in general to work even MORE in their favor:

"Hey, brandy-new shiny-new nurse, you want a GREAT job? We're now hiring into our special, elite EBOLA TEAM!! What an opportunity...!!"

chinny7150

Specializes in icu, er, pcu.

I do not think 'we' are prepared for this particular infectious disease. Not yet.

I do believe that we Nurses can adequately take care of an Ebola patient AFTER proper training, right protective gear, assistant to help gown and un-gown. Universal guidelines to follow much like we have in place that meet the criteria for say MRSA, measles, AIDS.

Throughout the country certain hospitals should be chosen to care for Ebola victims, and others quarantined due to exposure . Those hospitals and Nurses that are qualified to care for an infectious disease such as Ebola with added training would be successful in stopping the spread of that virus.

Hey CDC, get those guidelines out and also help distribute adequate PPE.

chinny7150

Specializes in icu, er, pcu.

Hey we are all Nurses here. Each has their own expertise. I value all Nursing personnel including CNA's. I am a RN and have been for over 30 years. I always listen to my co-workers, have assisted the team in anyway that I could, for the patient's sake.

You are valued. You are needed. I was you a long time ago and know the challenges facing you.

Thank God for LPN's, and CNA's and RN's. We can't be proactive without each other.

Patients come before all others... NO?

It is a concern that facilities are not prepared, but it is also a professional responsibility of nurses to get prepared on their own initiative. Be proactive and start learning what you need to know and presenting your Infection Control people with the new information. Don't worry about offending or treading on toes. If they are so incompetent, their toes need a little treading on.