Gave up DNP - page 3

Im an NP for almost a year. I got accepted into a DNP program right after school and I decided to defer it for a year--and I realize I am still not ready to go back to school and I am not really sure... Read More

  1. by   WestCoastSunRN
    My mentor is telling me to get the Doctorate. Because I'm young enough for it to make sense. But I'm working on the MSN now (CNS) -- and just can't imagine it. I seriously just want to be done with school. I'm AGCNS but work in an area where peds would be good to have, too. So maybe it'll make sense to do a peds only focused DNP (PNP or Peds CNS) -- but that adds even more time on. But I can't see getting it unless my employer will pay for it (either up front or in compensation afterwards).

    I know I can't have tenured teaching position without it, but I also know I CAN teach without it -- at least adjunct. It's a hard decision and one I'm avoiding for the time being.
  2. by   elijahvegas
    yeah cant for the life of me see any upside to getting a dnp

    gun to my head or it aint gonna happen
  3. by   Jules A
    Quote from WestCoastSunRN
    I know I can't have tenured teaching position without it, but I also know I CAN teach without it -- at least adjunct.
    In my area no more teaching on any level except undergrad clinicals without a doctorate.

    Quote from elijahvegas
    yeah cant for the life of me see any upside to getting a dnp

    gun to my head or it aint gonna happen
    Been there done that, ate my hat.
  4. by   djmatte
    Quote from Jules A
    In my area no more teaching on any level except undergrad clinicals without a doctorate.



    Been there done that, ate my hat.
    I don't discount it completely and if the situation presented where it is necessary, then I'd be all about it. Especially if I was going to teach. You should always have some degree of learning higher than the group or level you are planning to teach. But requiring it for entry level doesn't address the real concerns most people have for NPs in clinical practice.
  5. by   Jules A
    Quote from djmatte
    I don't discount it completely and if the situation presented where it is necessary, then I'd be all about it. Especially if I was going to teach. You should always have some degree of learning higher than the group or level you are planning to teach. But requiring it for entry level doesn't address the real concerns most people have for NPs in clinical practice.
    Yep. I'm not saying I found it valuable in the slightest for practice or even remotely challenging but I did feel in my area of a million universities that it was necessary to remain relevant and competitive.
  6. by   Spadeforce
    pondered getting a DNP, but decided med school was a better choice. I mean yeah it takes longer and much more hours but at least the curriculum was useful and adds much more income/knowledge/ability to go further in a career than DNP. Even though its literally 2 more years (DNP after FNP) vs starting all way over for medical school. Nothing about being an fnp transfers over credit wise to med school sadly

    Still to this day can't find the DNPs purpose other than being the end all be all nursing degree, but hats off to those who find use in it.
  7. by   Jules A
    Quote from Spadeforce
    pondered getting a DNP, but decided med school was a better choice. I mean yeah it takes longer and much more hours but at least the curriculum was useful and adds much more income/knowledge/ability to go further in a career than DNP. Even though its literally 2 more years (DNP after FNP) vs starting all way over for medical school. Nothing about being an fnp transfers over credit wise to med school sadly

    Still to this day can't find the DNPs purpose other than being the end all be all nursing degree, but hats off to those who find use in it.
    Smart man. you will get a far superior education, significantly higher salary and more respect. If I wasn't so old I would have done the same. Best wishes.
  8. by   JellyDonut
    Quote from Jules A
    Smart man. you will get a far superior education, significantly higher salary and more respect. If I wasn't so old I would have done the same. Best wishes.
    If I were younger I would go the MD route... I know now they are not that bright and I could coast their program
  9. by   Goldenfox
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I've been an APN for 12 years - nope not ever ever going back. Not worth it. Personally feel that unless it pays more, I ain't doing it - lol
    ^This.

    Thank you for telling it like it is, TraumaRN. I once was a DNP student and gave it up too. I came to terms with myself. I'm not all that young anymore. College is ridiculously expensive and DNPs do not earn any more money, practice privileges,or respect than NPs who don't have a DNP, so the ROI is terrible. Definitely wasn't worth going into serious student loan debt for---not for me.
  10. by   Spadeforce
    essentially three more semesters of writing papers and doing a capstone over some pointless topic nobody would ever care about for no increase in pay and some sort of "clinical but not really" ordeal. I didn't think the NP education i got was that great but better than whatever the DNP component was.
  11. by   TheSquire
    As someone who did complete their DNP...I wouldn't recommend it to everyone, and think that making it the entry degree for advanced practice was done for the benefit of the colleges and noone else. I'm also not surprised that the 2015 "deadline" for transitioning to DNP-entry as standard came and went with only backtracking and denials that it even existed from AACN et al.

    That said, there is a place for the DNP, not just for those doing instruction or applied research, but also for those who want to take on leadership roles in their practices and institutions (for example, many EDs with sizeable numbers of Advanced Practice Providers usually have a "Lead NP/PA" who handles managerial tasks) - or someone who just wants to know enough about Administration's job to be dangerous when they want to make changes at their institution. None of those things have direct clinical bearing - and part of the failing of AANC was that they sold the DNP as a way to train improved clinicians, which was the usual load of bull from them.
  12. by   Black Coffee
    I am a BS, BSN, RN right now. I am really interested in getting an FNP certificate at first with a concentration in biochemistry and molecular biology also/and a minor in Psychology. I got my BSN, RN after finishing school at UCD, a great school name. I plan to go back to school on 2020 because I will regain the admission trust from my nurse since a long time ago. She is a great nurse because she sacrifices her life to give hopes to people. I really appreciate what she did for me because she really cared for me good back then when I am a mental patient. Because of her, I changed my plan of getting a degree in Ph.D in Chemistry to become an RN. I will apply to UCD School of Nursing for the MSN-FNP track next year on May 1, the first one to apply. I hope I WILL get in b/c her. THANKS her anyway in whatever mean is possible. I have just applied to work at Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, CA for an L&D position. I came to talk with the nurse manager on the floor right away already. I really really and really hope the nurse manager will hire me to work there as soon as possible. I am great at my job right now as a MDS nurse in a nursing home. But I can quit my job to become a per-diem nurse anyways at the nursing home.

    THanks for your help nurse.

    Black Coffee, BS, BSN, RN
  13. by   Jules A
    Quote from Spadeforce
    essentially three more semesters of writing papers and doing a capstone over some pointless topic nobody would ever care about for no increase in pay and some sort of "clinical but not really" ordeal. I didn't think the NP education i got was that great but better than whatever the DNP component was.
    Turf the pitchfork yielding, Kool Aid slurping crowd my way when they assert you can't have an opinion because you haven't done it. My critical thinking skills when I reviewed the DNP curriculum from multiple schools were accurate and the entire process underwhelming. Basically I have spent a total of 8 years doing BSN coursework. Things need to change.

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