ADN or BSN?

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by Unsuregirl101 Unsuregirl101 (New) New Student Pre-Student

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CalicoKitty, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Geriatrics, Wound Care. Has 10 years experience. 981 Posts

In the end, with either the ADN or the BSN, you are sitting for the same NCLEX. Same questions. So, same preparation. So, the content of the courses will be the same.

londonflo

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 45 years experience. 2,192 Posts

23 hours ago, Unsuregirl101 said:

 I get super anxious and have really bad test anxiety.

First act of business - find out what services are available to help students succeed. Tutors, counselors, sessions on ways to decrease test anxiety? If you are currently taking pre-reqs look at your current school's services and start trying to get that test anxiety under control now.

Second- where are you with regard to pre-reqs for ADN and pre-reqs for BSN. With either program will you have to take any concurrently?

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New Critical care NP, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,288 Posts

Coming late to your post and maybe with an unpopular opinion. In the area where I live there are a few ADN and BSN programs. The ADN program graduates in that community college program are more ready to step into working on a floor than the BSN program graduates (ONLY referring to the programs I personally know about in my region). Our ADN program has students take 5 patients regularly in their last semester and the two local BSN programs don't have more than 3 patients throughout their four years. Yes, they have more theory classes and are touted as being able to critically think more than ADN graduates. BUT, being able to hit the floor running with solid clinical skills, while generating a paycheck to cover the additional BSN credits, may be advantageous for some people. 

opulentferret

opulentferret

20 Posts

Out of curiosity, why did you apply to the ABSN in the first place? Were you excited about it only to have second thoughts after applying?

I just finished applications, so I have no firsthand experience on the differences between the two programs. You really do have to consider all factors though. Examples are program cost, housing cost, commute time, cohort age, if you have to take out loans, course schedule, if you want to work / do other things during the program, program length, what city and institution you ultimately want to work at, resources at each school, if the program has Summer session, if the program includes a preceptorship, general reviews from students in the program, when you want to start / finish the program, mental health concerns or other health / family concerns, accreditation, NCLEX pass rates, etc. 

I do know that ADN programs are as, if not more, competitive compared to BSN and ABSN programs (at least in my area), so be confident you will get into one of the ADN programs (check past cohort admission statistics) if you choose to deny the ABSN offer. Personally, I would do the ABSN if the cost was low enough and if the commute (to school and clinicals) was short enough, but I’m not in your exact position. Only you can determine what the best option is for you.

speedynurse

speedynurse, ADN, BSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU. 544 Posts

I went for my ADN because I had spent a fortune on my masters degree prior to going to nursing school and I wanted a cheap option where I didn’t need a loan. However, an ADN is not any less stressful or easier than a BSN. If you aren’t a second career nursing student like I was and don’t need the more financially affordable option, go for the BSN and get it done. I have been dragging my feet on completing my BSN simply because it’s annoying and a pain when I already have a graduate degree.

Unsuregirl101

Unsuregirl101

5 Posts

47 minutes ago, opulentferret said:

Out of curiosity, why did you apply to the ABSN in the first place? Were you excited about it only to have second thoughts after applying?

I just finished applications, so I have no firsthand experience on the differences between the two programs. You really do have to consider all factors though. Examples are program cost, housing cost, commute time, cohort age, if you have to take out loans, course schedule, if you want to work / do other things during the program, program length, what city and institution you ultimately want to work at, resources at each school, if the program has Summer session, if the program includes a preceptorship, general reviews from students in the program, when you want to start / finish the program, mental health concerns or other health / family concerns, accreditation, NCLEX pass rates, etc. 

I do know that ADN programs are as, if not more, competitive compared to BSN and ABSN programs (at least in my area), so be confident you will get into one of the ADN programs (check past cohort admission statistics) if you choose to deny the ABSN offer. Personally, I would do the ABSN if the cost was low enough and if the commute (to school and clinicals) was short enough, but I’m not in your exact position. Only you can determine what the best option is for you.

I'm just having really bad anxiety about it all. I have decided I will go with the BSN option and redirect my energy to more positive and encouraging thoughts. Thank you so much for your input! 

opulentferret

opulentferret

20 Posts

5 hours ago, Unsuregirl101 said:

I'm just having really bad anxiety about it all. I have decided I will go with the BSN option and redirect my energy to more positive and encouraging thoughts. Thank you so much for your input! 

I’m sure there will be people in your cohort that feel the same. ? Good luck!!

CKPM2RN

CKPM2RN, ASN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency. Has 5 years experience. 330 Posts

For heck's sake. Do what most of my friends have done: Get your ADN and work for an employer that will pay part, most, or sometimes all, of your BSN. Why not take advantage?

londonflo

londonflo

Specializes in oncology. Has 45 years experience. 2,192 Posts

On 4/16/2021 at 12:11 PM, Neo Soldier said:

Each class is one credit hour expect for Foundations for Nursing Practice which is a 4 credit class.

A one credit failure counts as a failure no matter where you go BSN programs have 1 credit course also.

Have you done anything re. test anxiety? 

 

SarHat17

SarHat17, ADN

Specializes in CVRU, Intermediate. Has 10 years experience. 56 Posts

Here's my recent situation to consider if it's helpful!

I have my ADN (and the program was definitely not easy or less stressful) and have been researching/considering going back for BSN vs MSN. My future opportunities are hugely opened up with BSN, in and out of my current health system. Long story short, I was considering moving from a 3 12s bedside position to a M-Th or M-F office/clinic/other position late this year, but:

1. Moving off my 3 day/week schedule will decrease my school available time (Both kids will be in school M-F starting in the fall.) and could impact how successful and/or how quickly I can move through either BSN or MSN program. I've been looking at the WGU program vs the more "traditional" schools with semesters, etc.

2. My personal goal is to stay within my health system, and the positions open to someone with a MSN in Informatics are about 3 people at this time, so my odds of moving into those roles are extremely limited.

3. If I wanted to return from a clinic position to the floor (to get back that more flexible schedule) before I achieve my BSN, I would likely find it much more difficult as I would be an ADN competing with BSN applicants. (Our system doesn't "grandfather in" or consider experience in some situations; we are really moving toward Magnet, etc.)

I encourage everyone to move toward the BSN as soon as possible (for them) if they are in an ADN program. I wish I had worked for a year, and then started a BSN bridge program, and then this whole situation would be a fairly distant memory haha!

 

Tommy5677

Tommy5677

107 Posts

I know that things have changed a lot since I went to nursing school but for anyone who thinks an ADN program is somehow slower or easier, you are very much mistaken. My first semester in an ADN program was 18 semester hours. Yes, you read it right. My Fundamentals of Nursing class alone was 7. Nursing school is a gruel no matter what program you choose and again I will remind people here that ADN's and BSN's take the same test. The NCLEX. What does that mean? The extra stuff you get in the BSN (research, community health) is NOT on the exam. If they were there would be separate tests. There are not. ADN's are just as prepared as BSN's to take and pass the NCLEX.

My advice as I've given many times, is get the ADN at the community college level first. Yes, there are fewer opportunities compared to the BSN but you're not going to stop there. You get the ADN, take the test, get a job, and immediately enroll in the RN to BSN. There are numerous CCNE accredited programs online. It will save you a lot of money so you can get your BSN this way for about $30K.

There are also fast track MSN programs where if you already have an undergrad degree, you just take the BSN coursework and you graduate with the MSN.

There ya have it.

 

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 7 years experience. 3,488 Posts

I would normally suggest that if you have the opportunity to do either BSN/ABSN or ADN, you should go for the BSN/ABSN option because you would generally have greater employment possibilities. However if your only option (or acceptance) happens to be an ADN program, take it. You can do BSN later.