Jump to content

ADN+ARMY

Government   (1,814 Views | 9 Replies)

1,746 Profile Views; 15 Posts

I see that in the past this question has been asked, but years have passed since then. Can anyone give me a current update on a)does the army recruit ADNs and b)what are some differences between civilian sector nursing and army nursing.

Thank you in advance for the assistance, I am interested in going into military nursing but do not want to wait to complete my BSN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

292 Posts; 5,127 Profile Views

No. They don't recruit ADNs anymore. They used to have a STRAP program in which they paid for ADNs to get their BSN but they cut that program out. Now you have to have a BSN to walk through the door. That's all I know because I only have an ADN. I was talking to a recruiter a few months before the STRAP program was discontinued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

4 Followers; 226 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 320,859 Profile Views

You will need a baccalaureate degree (a.k.a. BSN) to commission into the Army Nurse Corps. In addition, the US Army is overstrength on nurses right now, which means they have a surplus of nurses at the present time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,363 Posts; 130,683 Profile Views

I see that in the past this question has been asked, but years have passed since then. Can anyone give me a current update on a)does the army recruit ADNs and b)what are some differences between civilian sector nursing and army nursing.

Thank you in advance for the assistance, I am interested in going into military nursing but do not want to wait to complete my BSN.

The Army requires a BSN to commission, and is also not recruiting RNs without at least two years of nursing experience. We are very overstrength right now. Your best bet is to get some civilian experience, then contact a healthcare recruiter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

jfratian has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

1,388 Posts; 12,421 Profile Views

I think everyone before me adequately answered your first question. Get a BSN and some experience.

I would say military nursing in general is 75% similar to civilian nursing. Taking care of patients is taking care of patients. There are a few big differences. You get a salary and aren't paid per hour; most military nurses work closer to 48hrs/week plus additional duties (~4-16hrs per month depending on the job) when not deployed. Obviously, there is a risk of being deployed (not so much right now). You'll likely move every 2-4 years. There's also extra red tape; taking a vacation or doing a semi-dangerous activity (even skiing) requires significant paperwork. Also, patient acuity is generally significantly lower in a military hospital when not deployed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 Followers; 37,675 Posts; 102,944 Profile Views

Your best bet is to always check with a healthcare recruiter to see what the latest acquisition policy is. Programs change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hancock330 specializes in Medical-Surgical - Care of adults.

67 Posts; 3,570 Profile Views

I'm a few years out of date -- in 2007 I retired from 22 years in the Army Reserves -- but if you are REALLY interested in an Army career, talk to a recruiter about opportunities in the Reserves. I'm pretty sure that IF they offer you a commission, continuing participation would be based on getting your BSN within a stated number of years. There would be the possibility of being mobilized (being called to active duty for a period of time specified by the Commander in Chief -- AKA the President of the United States) and being deployed (sent to one of the garden spots in the world -- AKA the desert -- AKA Southwest Asia). During my time in the Reserves I was mobilized for Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm by the first President Bush and spent a bit over 8 months on active duty, divided between 2 Army hospitals in the Southeast US; I was again mobilized by the second President Bush and spent 18 months on active duty at a different Army hospital in the southeast US. Now, I entered the Reserves after I had earned my MSN -- but back then, nurses with an ADN could be commissioned and promoted without ever earning a BSN. I KNOW those days are past, but I don't know whether all commissions for nurses with an ADN are past. So, if you're interested in that option, check with a NURSE recruiter (not the person at your local recruiting station). And, not all 3 services that commission nurses have the exact same policies, so you might also consult with the Air Force and Navy reserve NURSE recruiters.

Finally, your age matters. If you are over a certain age (somewhere between 35 and 38) you may not be able to stay in a military service long enough to retire, regardless of your qualifications, so if that is a goal of seeking a commission, keep that in mind.

Good luck and I applaud your desire to serve your country by being an Army nurse. There are other equally proud organizations, but none prouder for service by a nurse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,363 Posts; 130,683 Profile Views

I'm a few years out of date -- in 2007 I retired from 22 years in the Army Reserves -- but if you are REALLY interested in an Army career, talk to a recruiter about opportunities in the Reserves. I'm pretty sure that IF they offer you a commission, continuing participation would be based on getting your BSN within a stated number of years.

Currently the Reserves requires a BSN and will not commission ADN-prepared nurses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

5,144 Posts; 69,561 Profile Views

To be clear the army WILL recruit you and be happy to have you with an ADN. Just not in the nurse corps. An otherwise qualified canidate with an associates degree would be considered a valuable recruit. You would be recruited as an enlisted person but would probably qualifiy for any enlisted job you want.

In my capasity of Scoutmaster for a boy scout troop I speak with an army recruiter weekly. He told me that he has recruited several ADN RNs in the last year to be warrent officer helicopter pilots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

48 Posts; 2,186 Profile Views

mwaits081,

You probably don't need another person telling you the same thing that everyone else has said, but I recently (1 month ago) spoke with an Army Healthcare recruiter and can verify that everything that everyone has said so far is true. The Army (and every other military branch...) is over strength and is not actively recruiting nurses, much less ADN nurses. Such a bummer :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.