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Accelerated vs. Traditional Program

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by theivleague theivleague (New) New

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I was wondering other than the shortened time period, what would make someone go to an accelerated program vs. a traditional. Typically the accelerated programs cost more money vs the traditional. I was just wondering if perhaps the accelerated second degrees might potentially be a better fit for management positions because there are 2 degrees? Just something I heard, not my opinion, but I want to hear yours!

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147 Posts; 3,596 Profile Views

I can only speak for myself, but I chose an accelerated program for the following reasons. First, I am a non-traditional student being older and going into nursing as a second career. I don't have the luxury of the same amount of time that students just starting out have. So, getting through a program faster was my main goal. Secondly, I already had a degree so repeating a lot of the gen ed classes that would be required in a traditional program seemed like a waste of time. Being a single mom, I need to get through a program asap and get a job to support myself and my children. I actually like the faster pace of the accelerated program. It is extremely challenging but it forces you to really invest yourself and your time into it. I graduate in May.

As far as management, I don't think traditional vs. accelerated makes a difference. I do feel that if you want to go into management, a BSN would be beneficial over an ADN/ASN.

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RunBabyRN has 2 years experience and specializes in L&D, infusion, urology.

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I haven't heard about there being an advantage to two separate degrees, as far as advancement or management. Pursuing your master's in some area of nursing would be a more advantageous step to take.

You would only pursue the accelerated programs if you already HAD a bachelor's, so you'd have that second degree, regardless of whether you chose accelerated or traditional (we had second bacc students in my traditional program).

I will say, I have not seen any advantage in the job market for those in my class that already had a degree prior to nursing.

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NICU Guy has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

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The only advantage is that you are in a cohort with predominately non-traditional students (although there were classmates that had just finished their first degree 3 days before starting the ABSN program). They have allied health work experience (psychology, athletic training, sports medicine, EMS, neurobiology) that can add to class discussions that you wouldn't have in a traditional program.

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iPink has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, Postpartum.

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There is NO advantage between one or the other. A BSN is a BSN whether you got it in 15 months via an accelerated program or four years via a traditional route.

I graduated from an accelerated program, and my first degree is meaningless in nursing if I chose to pursue managerial positions. As previous poster mention, I took that route because I wanted my degree sooner than later. In my particular area when I was looking at programs, my ABSN program cost the same as the local community college who offered an Accelerated ASN. The choice was obvious at that point.

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Do you like your accelerated program? How are your/your classmates grades? I am interested in accelerated programs, in that I am older and have a previous BA, but I want to make good grades so that I can continue to a competitive masters program. Would it be unwise to do accelerated in my case?

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189 Posts; 5,090 Profile Views

I'm a second-degree student in a traditional program. I was able to transfer in all my general courses except for a couple, so I did 1 year part time and 2 years full time for the BSN. I'm finishing in May. I also applied to the accelerated program at the same school at the same time, but that one is more competitive and I'd already been accepted to the traditional program so they contacted me and told me that because I was already in one program they weren't going to consider me for the accelerated program. I only would have finished months earlier in the long run anyway, and I wouldn't have had time to work and make money over the summers, so I'm happy with the way things worked out. It's nice to be in classes with people with all different types of experiences. If I'd gone to the accelerated program, I never would have met my friend who was a hairdresser before nursing school and gives me the best haircuts of my life, and we also have a lot of students who have children in the traditional program.

Anyway, my point. If you already have a degree, it really doesn't matter whether you do a second traditional degree or an ABSN. You will end with two 4-year degrees no matter what. If you DON'T already have a degree, I wouldn't recommend doing one and then an ABSN over just doing a traditional BSN unless you have a huge drive to study a specific subject, have money to spare, and/or have a good plan for using both degrees. My first degree is in biology and while I loved it and learned a lot and apply a lot of it to nursing, it's not going to do me any good nursing-career-wise.

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windsurfer8 has 10 years experience and specializes in Med Surg/Psych.

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The purpose of ABSN programs are for people with previous bachelors degrees. They are super intense, but they feel a more mature person who has already been able to graduate college once can handle it. That is why they have minimum GPAs on your first degree. When I did my ABSN it was 21 hours a semester. There was no partying or raising hell. It was straight business from day 1 until I graduated.

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babeinboots has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Labor and Delivery.

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I do not have a previous bachelors degree, yet I am in a ABSN program. Although most of my classmates have a previous bachelors, not all of us do, but there is a rumor that my university will make a previous bachelors degree a requirement in the future.

I chose this program because it would have taken me the same amount of time to get an ADN as it would to get my BSN in my program. Although I attend a private school and it is a little more expensive PER A YEAR, than the traditional schools in my area, it ends up being less expensive in the long run because my program is only 22 months as oppose to 2 1/2 - 3 years.

I enjoy the fast pace of the program, but it does get tough at times. I'm happy with my choice and grateful that I made it in. Just do your research and make sure which ever program you choose is right for you. Good luck.

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189 Posts; 5,090 Profile Views

babeinboots, I'm really curious how that works. Do you do a couple semesters of generals, then start the accelerated program? Otherwise I'm not sure how you could do a full baccalaureate degree in just the 4 semesters. Or am I misunderstanding something? I know that the programs I looked at were all exclusively second-degree programs, but I was only looking at a few specific programs (in Maine and Minnesota).

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windsurfer8 has 10 years experience and specializes in Med Surg/Psych.

1,264 Posts; 11,062 Profile Views

How can you be in an ABSN without a previous bachelors? You can be in a traditional and take a lot of classes, but ABSN programs require a previous bachelors. What school is this?

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babeinboots has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Labor and Delivery.

1 Follower; 260 Posts; 5,413 Profile Views

National University

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