A stupid BSN question.....

Posted

I'm sure all of you are sick of discussing this topic.... but I sincerely have a question that I need help with and some understanding on.

I have a 4 year degree from a Minnesota State School in Corrections and Law Enforcement. I have been out of college for 10 years now and have recently (well it's been in my mind for 15 years) decided to go back to school and get my 2yr RN degree.

I have applied at our local Community College (and was accepted), I start my pre-reqs in the fall and have 5 semesters (taking one course a semester) until I can apply for the RN program. (I have 3 kids and I am a SAHM with a hubby who travels 4 days a week so I'm taking it slow until the kids are all in school)

Anyway, it is a great fit for me. I am extremely excited about getting my ADN and I have high hopes of working in Labor and Delivery/PP/ or the NICU. However, I wonder if I should do more research about getting a BSN since I already have a Bachelors or will just having that Bachelors (even though it's in a different field) be helpful enough? The closest school that offers a BSN program for me is an hour away. My CC is 1/2 hour away. It would take me a lot longer (obviously) and I just don't really want to do it.

I have absolutely no desire to go into any sort of management. I really am only doing this for me. (My husband supports us fine financially) so I'm just fulfilling a dream I've had for many years with the support of my family....

I'm just worried (with all the talk) that someone with a BSN is going to be considered for a position over me. Or will the fact that I have a Bachelors help at all (even though it's in a different field??)....

I prefer the ADN because of all it's components fitting just right for me right now, but is the BSN something I should look closer at?

Thanks for reading this... sorry it's so long... any advice or just encouragement would be appreciated....

mom2michael, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Rural Health. 1,168 Posts

Really the choice is yours. I have a very similar background in education and had also been out of school almost 10 years. There was an accelarated BSN program, 18 months long, but it was 2 hours away and came with a price tag of $500/credit hour. I also explored the option of the generic BSN at the place where I obtained my 1st degree but I was looking at almost 1 1/2 years of pre-reqs and waiting to get in to that program and the cost of tuition has really gone up there as well since I left 10 years ago.

CC worked for me - I was lacking 2 classes, both of which I was able to take while in NS. It's close (about 40 mins. away), it's cheap at $100/credit hour and it gives me what I want when I graduate which is to be an RN.

So it basically came down to what would work for myself and my family. Yes the BSN would've been nice but I want to be an RN and either an ADN or a BSN is going to give me that ability. BSN's in my area do not make more and basically all you get is management positions with it. I could not justify the cost of the BSN coupled with the stress it would cause my family for no more gain for me at the current time. Do I want to go back and get my BSN, yes, but that will come with time.

Good luck to you!!!

firstyearstudent

853 Posts

I am just finishing up my first year at community college. I was told by the recruiter for the BSN accelerated program that she honestly couldn't tell me that a BSN would improve my job opportunities, salary, or even my application to Master's degree programs. I already have a B.A. from a prestigious university, so I don't have anything to prove to myself and I feel that I'm educated enough. I'm not even fulfilling the requirements for the ADN. I'm just doing the nursing classes that would qualify me to sit for the boards.

imenid37

1,804 Posts

I think who you are and how you present yourself is of more importance in an interview for a job right now. There is a nursing shortage. Our manager likes to hire people who seem motivated,have experience (be it life or in nursing), and show enthusiasm. You already have shown that you have the capabity to earn the 4 year degree. Just go for what works best for you. You will have a job when you graduate.

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience. 4 Articles; 14,603 Posts

luvmy3kids. . .already having a bachelor's degree you understand that one of the things that is different between the adn and bsn is the number of credit hours each school requires to earn the degrees. also, in bsn programs there are some upper division nursing courses that have to be taken that are not given in adn programs. despite what you might read on the forums, those who have gone the adn to bsn route will tell you that there is a difference in the depth of what is taught in the adn programs compared to the bsn programs. if adn is what you want then that is what you go for. that is what i went for when i started out. however, just so you know, i soon found out that i wanted more. with a bachelor's degree already in your hand, i suspect the same will happen with you--but, i could be wrong not knowing anything else about you. also, some people are prone to stepping forward to being leaders or people see the ability in them. that said, if you are one of them, bachelor's level nursing will probably be knocking on your door in the future anyway whether you intended for it to happen or not.

MA Nurse

Specializes in NICU, Telephone Triage. 676 Posts

I'm sure all of you are sick of discussing this topic.... but I sincerely have a question that I need help with and some understanding on.

I have a 4 year degree from a Minnesota State School in Corrections and Law Enforcement. I have been out of college for 10 years now and have recently (well it's been in my mind for 15 years) decided to go back to school and get my 2yr RN degree.

I have applied at our local Community College (and was accepted), I start my pre-reqs in the fall and have 5 semesters (taking one course a semester) until I can apply for the RN program. (I have 3 kids and I am a SAHM with a hubby who travels 4 days a week so I'm taking it slow until the kids are all in school)

Anyway, it is a great fit for me. I am extremely excited about getting my ADN and I have high hopes of working in Labor and Delivery/PP/ or the NICU. However, I wonder if I should do more research about getting a BSN since I already have a Bachelors or will just having that Bachelors (even though it's in a different field) be helpful enough? The closest school that offers a BSN program for me is an hour away. My CC is 1/2 hour away. It would take me a lot longer (obviously) and I just don't really want to do it.

I have absolutely no desire to go into any sort of management. I really am only doing this for me. (My husband supports us fine financially) so I'm just fulfilling a dream I've had for many years with the support of my family....

I'm just worried (with all the talk) that someone with a BSN is going to be considered for a position over me. Or will the fact that I have a Bachelors help at all (even though it's in a different field??)....

I prefer the ADN because of all it's components fitting just right for me right now, but is the BSN something I should look closer at?

Thanks for reading this... sorry it's so long... any advice or just encouragement would be appreciated....

I've had my ADN since 1989 and I've always heard that "they" are going to make the entry level nurse have a BSN...it's never happened where I live.

In my unit a BSN doesn't give you more pay. There are some jobs that say "BSN preferred", but with the nursing shortage, I don't think a BSN is absolutely necessary. One job I can think of that requires a BSN is school nursing.

I think you should do what is easier for you since you have kids...trust me, you won't be out of a job with an ADN.

Good luck!;)

WVUturtle514

Specializes in Anesthesia. 185 Posts

I agree with the above poster. My fiance got his bachelor's degree in criminal justice and then went back and got his ADN because in his words, "I never had a desire for management or anything else I would need a BSN for, I just wanted to be a nurse." Well, lo and behold, 5 years later he has decided that he wants to become a CRNA.....so now he is finishing his BSN online in order to apply to a CRNA program and it has been the BIGGEST pain in the A$* you can imagine (for reasons that I don't have time to go into here). He is really kicking himself for not going and getting his BSN to begin with. I'm not saying this would happen to you, but just an anecdotal story to think about. Even if you have no desire for management, you may find that having a BSN will open up doors for you years down the road that you never imagined before. Just keep in mind that you will have greater options if you ever decide to pursue endeavors in the future. Best of luck to you!!!

luvmy3kids

675 Posts

Thanks everyone! I'm really leaning towards the ADN and I guess if I decide to go on someday...... who knows.....

I just wanted to see what all of you thought... Thanks again!

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 30 years experience. 30,540 Posts

ADN is a good option.

I'm going back for my BSN after 15 years, because I still have about 20 years of work left to do. I currently work at the beside and have for 15 years. I don't want to do management jobs. Who knows I may want to get away from the bedside and teach, do research, work in public health or any number of positions that are BSN preferred in nursing. So it's an investment in my future. The BSN will get you other jobs besides management. Sometimes an alternate degree will get you in, but with two equally qualified candidates the BSN gets the edge.

The ADN fits in with your short term goal of fulfilling a dream while financially being supported by your husband. But what if things change and you HAVE to work and it's 20 years later and you're 52 and tiring of the bedside?

Just some things to think about.

Good luck.

purplemania, BSN, RN

2,617 Posts

why don't you get your license after the ADN degree then take a BSN program online afterwards, assuming you find a need/desire for it.

TazziRN, RN

6,487 Posts

18 years of nursing and I've never seen a BSN get a position just because of the BSN. There are certain positions where one is required: admin, public health, etc, but most hospital-based jobs are open to all with an RN license. Almost all positions list "graduated from an accredited school of nursing and active RN license" as requirements. Whether or not you have an ADN or BSN is not listed unless the position is one of the few that require a BSN. If what you want is an ADN, go for that. If you change your mind later and want your BSN you can get it then.

Melina

Specializes in home health, neuro, palliative care. 289 Posts

I have always felt that more education is better in almost all situations. I have heard a few BSNs on the forum say that they regret not staying an ADN, but only a few. I don't know about your program, but the BS to BSN programs out here are only 18 months, but those are INTENSE months. It's a sensittive subject, because the implication is that there is something 'better' about BSN nurses. Personally, the biggest factor in my decision to get my BSN was the waiting list for the ADN program. I will have my BSN before I would even get into the ADN program.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.