A less stressfull career choice

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by jherd jherd Member

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SeattleJess

SeattleJess

Specializes in None yet.. 843 Posts

I figured I'd get a bunch of "put your big girl panties on and deal with it" responses....If those rules are standard everywhere then guess I have no choice then...I haven't gotten the signing bonus, but I think I'll put it in a savings account and give it back to them if I can't take the grind.

But, to for the person that asked if I came from a salaried world. Yes, I did, I was the head of my department and I could take a day off here and there if I needed. I haven't clocked in at a job since I was a teenager.

It's an adjustment for sure. Thanks to those that responded.

It is ROUGH to change to a new culture and to entry level at that after a successful career! I wonder, also, whether your needs for respect and autonomy are getting tweaked by not being met in the ways to which you are accustomed. I know I liked having flexibility in my schedule (though it was a 50-60 hour week) and being the last word on most decisions.

I know that's true for me as a late-life career changer. But old dogs can learn new tricks and we do if are motivated enough by our new path.

Smart to bank that signing bonus!

Edited by SeattleJess

Wrangler156

Wrangler156

Specializes in PACU, Oncology/hospice. Has 2 years experience. 75 Posts

I understand what you are saying, I hated my nursing job in the hospital. I am now in ambulatory surgery and it is 10X better than the hospital. I was a new nurse in the hospital for about 6 months I gave it my 6 months hated every second of it and left with my 2 week notice in place. I know what you mean about the time off stuff its ridiculous. Anyone who says you are stuck do NOT believe them. I am going back to school to get my NP so I don't become "stuck" best of luck to you I understand where you are coming from. Look for a nursing job outside the hospital community health, outpatient surgery, de office, etc. Money may not be the same but I may be worth it. Best of luck to you - nurse with only 8 months of experience under my belt.

jherd

jherd

17 Posts

It is ROUGH to change the a new culture and to entry level at that after a successful career! I wonder, also, whether your needs for respect and autonomy are getting tweaked by not being met in the ways to which you are accustomed. I know I liked having flexibility in my schedule (though it was a 50-60 hour week) and being the last word on most decisions.

I know that's true for me as a late-life career changer. But old dogs can learn new tricks and we do if are motivated enough by our new path.

Smart to bank that signing bonus!

Yes, respect is another issue. It is certainly a tough situation when you have twenty-somethings sort of sizing you up, and determining that you are beneath them professionally because they have 2-5 years on the job more than you.

However, that's a hill I have to climb, alone, to get their respect. I have to take it upon myself to do an outstanding job at all times, to learn at every opportunity and be a professional.

Thanks for the words of encouragement.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience. 67 Articles; 14,008 Posts

I am a new hire RN, that just started the nurse residency program in an ICU setting. It's day 8 and I sort of feel like I am a private in the Army again. No phones except on lunch, no drinks or outside of the kitchen or the manager will throw your drink away, miss more than 4 shifts in a year and get reprimanded, fight it out for vacations, you can't have a day off unless you get someone to work your shift and then you work theirs and you can't get overtime without prior approval, you can't clock in more than 7 minutes before your report time, clock in 1 minute late and it's counted against you.

I understand why those rules are in place, but I'm a grown adult. I've already retired from another career and I'm not looking forward to being treated like a child. I signed a three year contract but I seriously regret it, so far.

I was wondering if anyone could recommend any RN career paths that are less stressful and demanding and allow you to have a life outside of work.

I'm not sure how these rules are so stressful. Yes, you can have a day off -- if you request it in advance or if you switch with someone. You probably get 3 or 4 days off a week. It isn't as if you're working 12 hour shifts 7 days a week! Why would you expect to be able to clock in early, late or whenever is convenient for you? As far as overtime -- that's a budget issue. Of course it has to be approved. I'm not sure what field you came from, but nursing is a whole 'nother ball game than most fields.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience. 67 Articles; 14,008 Posts

No food/drinks rule is a health code. I think all of the other things depend on the culture of the hospital, because I've seen nurses pull out their cell phones to text in front of patients. Then again, the nurses were seasoned and I don't think their cared about being caught, because they were pretty secure in their jobs.(no offense to the vets out there. )

We text the providers with questions. So yes, sometimes it happens in the patient room or in front of a patient. The less seasoned nurses are more guilty of it than the seasoned nurses . . . unless my patient is actively coding, I can step out of the room and walk down the hall to talk to them face-to-face. Or call them from the desk.

f1j1nurse

f1j1nurse

Specializes in Corrections, Psych, Public Health. Has 8 years experience. 114 Posts

Same rules here, except no cell phones ever!! And we have to post and bid for our vacations, only two weeks in the whole year and it goes by seniority! I work in a prison.

jherd

jherd

17 Posts

You probably get 3 or 4 days off a week. It isn't as if you're working 12 hour shifts 7 days a week!

Right now, I work 20 (8 hours) shifts a month. I get 2 days off a week and I spent one day recovering from working 5 days in a row and the other day getting 5 days of uniforms, lunches and kids ready for the upcoming week.

but, I hope to go to 2 12s and 2 8s, in a few months.....

Edited by jherd

greygirl81

greygirl81

17 Posts

I'm getting ready to start a medical coding program....I still Get to use all my nursing knowledge but no patient care! And I can gave coffee at my desk! I've been a nurse for 5 years and all that stuff is pretty standard though....give it time. The one thing I could never get used to was not having a drink, I worked in long term care though and always found a place to hide a drink.

BlueDawnRN

BlueDawnRN, BSN

Specializes in Progressive Care. Has 8 years experience. 108 Posts

I hear your frustration, really. I also came from a salaried office job.

A lot of those rules don't come from your unit or even the hospital. When the Joint Commission comes to evaluate the hospital they have to make sure these rules are being followed, like no food/drinks outside the break room (infection control) and no cell phones (hipaa). Your manager has to enforce rules about clocking in and out because he/she has to answer to higher ups who go over that with a fine toothed comb. I'm sure these higher ups have little understanding of what it's like to work on the floor. A lot of it comes down to reimbursement.

As far as time off, this is not unique to nursing. I have a family member in law enforcement who actually gets "sick checked"...as in another officer can be sent to your home and make sure you're actually home sick! They're also very limited in when they can take time off, and he gets vacations denied all the time depending on whether officers with more time have requested the same days off. I think this is common in blue collar jobs.

I think most Nursing Jobs are like this with the exception of a few that are not entry level. The respect you get as a nurse is different than the respect you get at other jobs. You may have to clock in at a certain time and leave your phone in your locker, but I find I get a lot more respect as a nurse than I ever did in any other job. Especially as an ICU nurse I think you'll see this to be true!

Best of luck in orientation and congrats on the job :)

ChronicSG

ChronicSG

Specializes in Oncology. 63 Posts

This sounds like my hospital in FL J. I won't disclose anything else aside from that. I wish you the best though considering I am also going through an orientation M. Honestly though, the rules aren't what I'm concerned about H. I can't wait to get to working with real patients.

strawberryflds

strawberryflds

5 Posts

Par for the course same rules everywhere some due to state regs the others due to most of us work for profit facilities.

englishgarden

englishgarden

28 Posts

I have worked as an RN for 24 years with 18 years in critical care. The protocol for clocking in and out, cell phones, and requests for days off is standard in the hospital environment and you will get use to it. Many hospitals have solved the issue of drinks on the unit by allowing nurses to have water stored in a covered container that does not sweat. It is not appropriate to ask nurses in an ICU to go to the breakroom to drink water...those rooms are usually locked, and you can't hear alarms or watch you patients from the breakroom! Furthermore, working in ICU is very adrenaline provoking increasing the need for fluids! Many units are participating in "self governance", you might see if there is a committee on your unit. Having the opportunity to work in an ICU is both exciting and an honor. Join a professional organization such as the AACN and focus on learning! While intensive care can be stressful there is the satisfaction of having only one or two patients and feeling the satisfaction of a job well done!