Recent ASN grad -- Perfect time to follow my dream and relocate across the country? - pg.2 | allnurses

Recent ASN grad -- Perfect time to follow my dream and relocate across the country? - page 2

Hello, everyone! I've been a long time reader of allnurses.com but this is my first time posting. I'm looking for advice/suggestions. Here's my story: About three weeks ago I graduated from an... Read More

  1. Visit  not.done.yet profile page
    3
    3K is completely inadequate to be honest, unless you are just one of those fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants people anyway or if you only like ramen noodles and efficiency apartments in bad parts of town and you don't own a car and like to walk. Have you done up a budget of what it takes you to live where you are right now? What do you pay in rent now? What does rent cost in a similar type of place in a similar type of neighborhood in the Sea-Tac area? How much do you spent on groceries per week? Personal upkeep like haircuts? Vehicle maintenance such as tires and oil changes? Pet care? Entertainment? Gas? Utilities? Insurance? What about the cost of the move itself? If you don't have much stuff, then the cost of getting stuff? What about medications if you take any and a way to deal with it if you incur medical expenses or any other unexpected snafus? Have you compared the cost of living where you are versus there? How long could you survive on $3000 where you are right now without any other income coming in? Because to do this smart, you need to plan it as if you won't have any other income, as it is possible to likely for at least a few months, you won't.

    The way the economy is, even getting positions delivering pizzas can be difficult right now and certainly would not pay enough to supplement a nest egg of only $3000. Honestly you need more than twice that much to make this work if you don't want to live feeling as if the wolf is at the door, preferably three to four times that much. If you put pen to paper you will readily see that. You sound like you have a very good head on your shoulders. Do the dirty work of researching this out, writing out a realistic budget (don't avoid putting stuff on there telling yourself you just won't ever go to the movies/golfing/hunting/fishing or whatever your personal thing is, that you'll stop cutting your hair or eating fish twice a week or whatever lifestyle you are used to living) and then make a plan. There is no reason at all you can't make this happen - just perhaps not right this second.
    Last edit by not.done.yet on Jan 4, '12
  2. Visit  nurseprnRN profile page
    2
    i loved seattle when i lived there, but it is not cheap and if you don't have a job to go to, then don't think you can just fly into seatac and get started. think about going out for a week or two, live cheap at the downtown y if you have to, rent a car to travel tacoma-bellingham, and check out all the options. your "cushion" would be better spent on that if it got you set up for an actual move.
    CCL RN and Barbara Hessinger like this.
  3. Visit  Ado Annie profile page
    1
    I did it! (after graduating from an ASN program in Indiana, in fact)
    Start the process of getting your Washington nursing license, then get those applications sent!!!

    edited to add... I moved hundreds of miles to another state, but not to Washington
    christophermiles likes this.
  4. Visit  WillowNMe profile page
    0
    I graduated last May, and due to the nursing economy in the Twin Cities, I was planning on moving. I looked into Alaska, Washington state, California, Texas and North Carolina. I ended up gunning for NC... come to think about, that all started about a year ago. I made two trips down there to do some networking, arranging housing for myself and my horse, scouted out the area a little bit... etc. Had everything planned - except for the part where I got offered a job up here in MN If you want to move, I would say go for it... I would just do some networking first.
  5. Visit  mc0306 profile page
    0
    I say do it! You only live once! I actually live in the Tacoma area but for me its too cold. I'll be moving once I am done with school. I know that for me, I want to be able to have experienced the things I have talked about doing instead of just dreaming (if that makes sense). Anyway, point is you don't have anything holding you back but yourself so do what your hear desires.
  6. Visit  Quark09 profile page
    1
    I live in Tacoma (originally from southern IL). For some of the bigger hiring entities, you really need at least a year's experience - for example, Multicare hires for several of the area's main hospitals (Mary Bridge Children's, Tacoma General, etc). They do occasionally hire new grads for externships, but they can be difficult to win . However, there are several agencies that do home health, clinic, LTC, etc hiring and welcome new grads. I don't necessarily think its an impossible job market here, but if you have a very specific area of nursing you're wanting to get into, you may find it helpful to broaden that scope. I would certainly send inquiry letters to any of the hospitals you're interested in right away; you may have a bit better luck if you go ahead and get your Washington license though, too. Good luck in whatever you decide!
    christophermiles likes this.
  7. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    The two separate discussions have been merged into one.
    christophermiles likes this.
  8. Visit  christophermiles profile page
    0
    Thanks for all the suggestions and comments, everyone. I'm still waiting for my authorization to test, but, whatever I decide, I'll be sure to update this thread.

    Thanks again!
  9. Visit  WrekDiver profile page
    1
    I would definitely have a job lined up before you made the move. New grad positions are very limited, and most hospitals will not hire ADN applicants (it's possible though). Your best bet will be to look for jobs in LTC. As far as finding other employment, the job market is still fairly difficult here, though better than much of the rest of the west coast (ie, Southern California, Portland, etc.), which may leave you without any job after the move. I am not sure how the cost of living compares, but it is fairly expensive here. I live about 20 miles north of Seattle and a one bedroom apartment goes for $800 - $1300 per month in this area.

    Also, I would suggest you at least visit before making the move. I moved here from California and have hated Seattle since day one. The weather is constantly miserable (it really does rain all the time, we never see the Sun), and people are very reclusive (probably due to the weather). Google "Seattle freeze" to give you an idea of the people here, they tend to be superficially polite, but not friendly at all. The fashion here is still mainly "grunge"; in actuality it was never a fashion here, it has just always been the way people dress, lots of hiking boots/shoes, fleece, hoddies, and flannel, for both men and women. I'm kinda biased I guess as I hate camping, don't hike, and prefer places like San Diego and New York. But, if you like the outdoors, and don't mind the weather this may be the place for you.

    I have never spent much time in Bellingham, but I have a bunch of friends that went to WSU there, and all of them said they liked it better than Seattle (but all of them ended up back in Seattle for work). Good luck with the choice, let us know what you decide.
    christophermiles likes this.
  10. Visit  CCL RN profile page
    0
    Quote from christophermiles
    Thanks for the comment, PintheD! My goal was to leave with at least $2,000. Do you think that would be sufficient cushion?
    In Seattle? Uh, no. That won't even get you into a cheap apartment (with your deposits and such).
    Quote from WrekDiver
    I would definitely have a job lined up before you made the move. New grad positions are very limited, and most hospitals will not hire ADN applicants (it's possible though). Your best bet will be to look for jobs in LTC. As far as finding other employment, the job market is still fairly difficult here, though better than much of the rest of the west coast (ie, Southern California, Portland, etc.), which may leave you without any job after the move. I am not sure how the cost of living compares, but it is fairly expensive here. I live about 20 miles north of Seattle and a one bedroom apartment goes for $800 - $1300 per month in this area. Also, I would suggest you at least visit before making the move. I moved here from California and have hated Seattle since day one. The weather is constantly miserable (it really does rain all the time, we never see the Sun), and people are very reclusive (probably due to the weather). Google "Seattle freeze" to give you an idea of the people here, they tend to be superficially polite, but not friendly at all. The fashion here is still mainly "grunge"; in actuality it was never a fashion here, it has just always been the way people dress, lots of hiking boots/shoes, fleece, hoddies, and flannel, for both men and women. I'm kinda biased I guess as I hate camping, don't hike, and prefer places like San Diego and New York. But, if you like the outdoors, and don't mind the weather this may be the place for you. .
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.That being said, I absolutely LOVE it here!! I've heard soooo many people mention the "Seattle chill" and honestly I've never seen it. Where I came from, this place is a delight, temperment-wise. If people are faking it, then they are doing a great job.The hiking, kayaking, skiing, camping....world class! I hike the nearby mountains every weekend, and in the summers, almost daily. Rain, or shine. Seattle is a wonderful place to live! But $3,000 isn't enough of a cushion. We had more than 10x that much in savings and were still nervous.
  11. Visit  WrekDiver profile page
    0
    Quote from CCL RN
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.
    I don't doubt it; he is a new grad though.
  12. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from CCL RN
    I've said this a few times before on this site, but I had absolutely no problems getting a job here in Seattle ith my ADN. I even beat out BSNs (who were locals here with double my nursing experience) To boot, I even received a relocation bonus.
    Then again, you have 6 years of nursing experience, which makes you more marketable and less risky than a new grad in the eyes of employers. In addition, if you graduated from nursing school 6 years ago, this would mean that you graduated into what had been a robust economy with abundant nursing jobs.
  13. Visit  bunnynuts profile page
    0
    For those of you currently in the program or recent grads - what have you experienced about getting that first RN job? I keep hearing that hospitals don't want to hire RN's with less than a year experience. Is this reality? Is it easier to get a position in the hospitals you've done your clinicals in? Are there cities/states that have greater need? I'm currently weighing if the cost of the Accelerated Programs are going to be worth it if there are no jobs out there. Any advice is appreciated!

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