No, I'm Not a Beauty Shop! - pg.3 | allnurses

No, I'm Not a Beauty Shop! - page 3

I should probably preface this post with some facts.......It was 3pm, I had just about EVERY frequent flyer in my office, I hadn't eaten my lunch yet and I just sat down to eat when in walks one of... Read More

  1. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    0
    Quote from DSkelton711
    I did a year of school nursing. If you don't set boundaries with the students, teachers and parents you will be doing all sorts of crazy stuff EVERYDAY. I don't understand why the teacher didn't do it in the first place. Next time maybe have the student wash their hands and talk them through inserting it themselves, that way they are learning.
    Very well said!
  2. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    4
    Quote from CherylRNBSN
    ...I do not consider this any different from my duties as a very busy med surg nurse. I put dentures in, remove them, give oral care, etc. Just this week, I provided a pt. with normal saline and specimen cups so she could remove her contacts before surgery. These are personal hygiene issues, and very much , I feel, my responsibility. ...
    But, the things you mentioned are "nursing duties" in my opinion. I have assisted students with orthodontic issues and with contact lens issues (to the best of my abilities). Undecorated earlobes will not prevent the child from accomplishing any ADLs. It won't prevent the child from learning, and it won't adversely impact her health or the health of other students. In my case, I get the requests for earring help so much, I needed to draw the line.

    If a child has newly pierced, unhealed earring holes, I'm sure the PE teacher would make an exception if the parent asked. If the teacher refused to make an exception, maybe wait until summer to get them pierced (when there is no school/PE)? Then, if my child threw a fit about waiting to have their ears pierced, I'd explain that there are rules in the world. Sometimes we don't agree, but we still have to follow them.
    brillohead, Jolie, mappers, and 1 other like this.
  3. Visit  Flare profile page
    3
    all things considered, i encounter this type of request maybe once or twice a month and it's almost always with a kindergartener that accidentally slipped it out. total time commitment is really negligible. I spend more time coaching these kids in how to properly use the tub of vaseline on their chapped lips (i.e. - use an applicator, no double dipping, don't you think about sticking your fingers in there). For me, the earring thing is really small potatoes, but i suppose if I had lines of girls needing earrings replaced after taking them out for PE, then yes... i'd be really ticked off about it.
    Sudsy, Tina, RN, and Fiona59 like this.
  4. Visit  uthscsa2011 profile page
    0
    AMEN SISTER!
  5. Visit  uthscsa2011 profile page
    1
    I'm sorry, but I have to agree with you. Teachers can sometimes take advantage of us and what we do. How is it fair that all the teachers and staff get to have lunch, but you can't until 30 min before you leave for the day? Not okay. I know sometimes that happens to us when we have crazy days, but sending a child to you because her earring fell out is not an emergency that you need to stop eating your lunch for. When I eat lunch, I only allow kids to come in if they need a med or it is an emergency (throwing up, fever, serious injury, allergy, ect), not for a scratch, hang nail, or an earring. Teachers can take two minutes from their teaching to pop an earring back in. We are the NURSES, which means we are paid to do nursing things. Come on now.
    Jolie likes this.
  6. Visit  Altra profile page
    3
    Quote from Roseyposey
    I am sure that six year old child learned a lesson about nurses and boundaries.
    Boundaries, yes.

    Hopefully the parent learned not to send the child to school with an accessory that is beyond her capability to manage independently.
    Last edit by Altra on Jan 25, '13 : Reason: grammar
    Jolie, nursel56, and Tina, RN like this.
  7. Visit  SchoolNurseTXstyle profile page
    10
    I have to agree with the OP. I know for me, I just don't have time to do stuff that does not take a nursing degree. I have 1300 kids, have close to 1,000 screenings to complete a year, 4 diabetics ( 1 non-compliant on a pump,1 with down syndrome and q2hour BG checks),16 daily meds, 94 PRN meds, 21 epi-pens, 27 rescue inhalers. These all require action plans, IHP's. My phone rings off the hook, i am always behind on e-mails, i still haven't input all off my clinic visits from December into the computer. I see about 50 kids a day (not counting meds, diabetics). 20 are for silly stuff ( i bit my lip 2 days ago). But, it takes a nursing assessment to sort out that silly stuff. Now, nobody else in the building can do most of this stuff but me. So, at 2:30 in the afternoon - if I choose not to do something a teacher who gets a daily lunch and a planning period could do with no problem - so that I can take a 15 minute break to shove a banana and a diet coke down my throat while I am answering e-mails just as my headache from hypoglycemia is setting in - well TOUGH! Like many others have said, we have to draw the line somewhere. Not because we like to be mean to children but because we are humans who can only do so much. As nurses, we are critical thinkers, problem solvers. As professionals, we have to triage, prioritize, and delegate as needed. If the OP feels that earring insertion needs to be delegated to teachers, i see no problem with it!
  8. Visit  SaoirseRN profile page
    5
    Quote from Roseyposey
    Wow. I guess I pick my battles more carefully. I guess I am spineless as I would take the path of least resistance, especially when it comes to a child. Look at all of the energy you have expended on this topic, rather than putting the earring back in. I am sure that six year old child learned a lesson about nurses and boundaries.
    Six year olds are very capable of learning lessons about boundaries, and one earring or similar request might be nothing, but the sense I'm getting is the repeated, multiple requests for non-nursing tasks are what is bothering the OP. A six year old without manners (not only did she not say please, she demanded the earring go back in NOW) can and should learn that it is inappropriate to speak to anyone that way.

    I agree with the OP.
    Jolie, nursel56, Tina, RN, and 2 others like this.
  9. Visit  CherylRNBSN profile page
    2
    Quote from DSkelton711
    I did a year of school nursing. If you don't set boundaries with the students, teachers and parents you will be doing all sorts of crazy stuff EVERYDAY. I don't understand why the teacher didn't do it in the first place. Next time maybe have the student wash their hands and talk them through inserting it themselves, that way they are learning.


    OK, well, I have to speak up for teachers here. They are EDUCATORS. They are busy EDUCATING. Personal hygiene...SCHOOL NURSE.

    They are just as busy as we are...
    Sudsy and TopazLover like this.
  10. Visit  Tina, RN profile page
    2
    Quote from CherylRNBSN
    OK, well, I have to speak up for teachers here. They are EDUCATORS. They are busy EDUCATING. Personal hygiene...SCHOOL NURSE.

    They are just as busy as we are...
    I wouldn't consider earrings an important part of "personal hygiene". That's kind of like saying that school nurses should also apply make-up to students as needed... Earrings and make-up are nice, but ultimately, not essential to learning or to good health.

    Sure, teachers are busy. However, as I mentioned in another post, they have responsibility for one classroom of students, while the nurse is responsible for the whole school. Plus, teachers always, and I mean *always*, get their full, uninterrupted breaks while at work (unlike the school nurse).
    Kim O'Therapy and Jolie like this.
  11. Visit  drowningdaily profile page
    3
    So true. Earring insertion is accessorizing and NOT hygiene.
    brillohead, Jolie, and Tina, RN like this.
  12. Visit  SchoolNurseTXstyle profile page
    3
    "OK, well, I have to speak up for teachers here. They are EDUCATORS. They are busy EDUCATING. Personal hygiene...SCHOOL NURSE.

    They are just as busy as we are... " I agree, they are busy! However, my state mandates teachers get a 30 minute DUTY-FREE lunch. Most of us are lucky to get 30 minutes the entire school year. Now, isn't every staff member responsible for the students they serve? Or, does this fall only to the nurse? if teachers are responsible for educating, why do they send kids out of the classroom so much for things that can be handled at the classroom level? Doesn't all of that missed class time impede the educational process?
    Kim O'Therapy, Jolie, and Tina, RN like this.
  13. Visit  CherylRNBSN profile page
    3
    Earrings that are not replaced can cause the piercing to close, necessitating a re-piercing.

    New piercings can become infected, easily. To me, this is personal hygiene. Unlike make up, or clothing or "accessorizing" . It involves a disruption in skin integrity, and potential for infection.

    Patient teaching is a cornerstone of nrsg practice. I would therefore teach the child how important it is to keep earrings in place, until healing is complete. I am guessing this would take a solid yr. for children.

    I would inspect ear for s/s of infection, disinfect earring, and reinsert. All the while teaching student/pt. how to do this for herself.

    I am not a school nurse, or a teacher. These are just my opinions about the matter.
    Sudsy, somenurse, and TopazLover like this.


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