Short Cuts in Nursing

  1. 6
    I have noticed that alot of you out there are looking for transition programs, shortcuts, and the "easiest way".

    There are no true shortcuts in nursing. As Nurse Practitioner(MSN ACNP/FNP), I have worked my way from the ground up: RN, A.A.S, followed by RN, B.S.N. followed by M.S.N. ACNP/FNP, and I can tell you from experience that taking shortcuts will not pay off.

    First of all, I find it funny that some of you still think there is a such thing as a 2 yr RN nursing program. A true RN program is 3 yrs, one year for general education followed by two subsequent years nursing. You are doing yourself no favors by shortcutting as when you apply for that "sweet position in a trauma center" that you've always wanted--your hiring nurse manager is going to take into acct how you received your education. Did you know that most ICU's will not hire Paramedic to RN nurses?

    Also, B.S.N. is not a waste by any means. The B.S.N. nurse is prepared to accept roles in clinical education as well as to pursue higher education with regards to faculty positions. In addition, the B.S.N. nurse is further trained in patient assessment, critical care interventions, as well as nurse management. New opportunities are becoming available all the time for B.S.N. Did you know that most aeromedical transport services will accept a B.S.N. nurse over an A.A.S./A.S.N./A.D.N. nurse any day of the week?

    Also, for those of you with non-nursing degrees seeking nursing education--please be aware that it will benefit you to use the general education you already have and to attend a traditional RN training program. Don't try to enter critical care M.S.N. coursework with a 4 yr degree in social studies.

    The majority of level 1 trauma centers will not even hire a nurse practitioner into a direct care position without that practitioner having at least 3 yrs experience as a non-master's RN.

    Undergraduate registered nursing is the foundation on which you build the framework for practice and develop a solid footing in the practice of nursing.

    I am afraid my days of sympathizing with the uninformed are over. We must wake up! The simple fact is: Nurses who take shortcuts, kill patients! Period.

    If I have offended some, then maybe you should step back and reassess why it is you want to become a nurse in the first place.

    To those who wish to put in the hours and earn their degree's,
    good luck in your studies. It is only when we seek to set about change within ourselves that we seek to set about change in our communities.

    - NeuroMedic RN, M.S.N., ACNP, FNP, CFRN, CCRN, ccNREMT-P, CF-P, & all the other $2 titles
    madwife2002, CrazyPremed, juicyjake, and 3 others like this.
  2. 5,245 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 23 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Did you know that most ICU's will not hire Paramedic to RN nurses?
    Are you referring to Paramedic to RN bridge courses?
  5. 2
    Thank you, NeuroMedic, for posting this (although I'm sure you'll get flamed for not being "warm & fuzzy" enough ). I, too, cringe every time I see another thread here about "what's the quickest/easiest/cheapest way to become ..." (an RN, NP, CRNA, etc. ).
    Hellllllo Nurse and llg like this.
  6. 9
    Quote from elkpark
    Thank you, NeuroMedic, for posting this (although I'm sure you'll get flamed for not being "warm & fuzzy" enough ). I, too, cringe every time I see another thread here about "what's the quickest/easiest/cheapest way to become ..." (an RN, NP, CRNA, etc. ).
    I cringe at those posts, too. It makes me wonder what type of nurse that person will be.

    However, SOME of the new programs are good ones, so I try hard to have an open mind when I meet the graduates of programs that provide an alternate path into nursing. In particular, some of the MSN entry programs and the accelerated BSN as 2nd degree programs are excellent and quite rigorous I'm fine with those programs as long as their graduates understand that they can't just walk into a leadership position or advanced level job until they get some entry-level experience as a practicing nurse first.

    I also think that some of the RN-MSN programs are quite good and a good option for the experienced ADN or Diploma grad.

    But with all programs, at any degree level, the quality of the specific programs varies greatly from school to school. Those people with the bad attitudes -- of wanting just to do the minimum -- will probably have problems in the future regardless of the program they choose. And people with a great attitude -- wanting and willing to put in some extra effort to be the best -- will probably make good nurses in the long run regardless of the program they choose.

    I'm suspect this thread will draw some "sparks" in the form of a few arguments. I'm glad I got a chance to post before the smoke and fire starts.
    sirI, NRSKarenRN, SarasotaRN2b, and 6 others like this.
  7. 7
    Neuromedic - I do agree with you on several levels, especially the direct-entry APN. My own opinion: you can't be an ADVANCED practice nurse w/o being a BASIC practice nurse. Personally, I would have done an ADN to MSN program if one had been available when I decided to return to school.

    My overall thought on this is that no matter what your level of entry into practice is, you must keep current. Education doesn't end with graduation! Nursing is an evolving science and I think you are more apt to "kill patients" or provide substandard care if you don't continue your education, both formally and informally.
  8. 0
    Quote from Medic2RN
    Are you referring to Paramedic to RN bridge courses?
    Yes, I am referring to the transition programs. I was and still am a critical care paramedic/CF-P for quite some time and I still found it best to challenge the traditional program in nursing. So many paramedics feel that they are prepared to challenge RN nursing; which in some cases may be true; however--we must think of the majority. I have yet to find one Paramedic which could properly explain to me the process of endochondral ossification and the role it has in osteological development. I am afraid nursing is more than just skills, one must be keenly aware of many aspects in patient care. This is not to say that Paramedics are by any means ineffective. They are just trained for a different type of environment.

    As for the warm fuzzies; I traded those in for my certificate of fitness. The truth is; there are very few things on this Earth that
    are beyond our control as far as health goes. I give sympathy where it is deserved.

    Will I sympathize with the MI pt downing a cheeseburger complaining about how God has cursed him with a bad heart?

    No.

    However, those person(s) suffering from uncontrollable etiologies(paralysis, cogenital defects, etc) are the ones that will get my sympathy.

    Once again, let's wake up children. If you keep feeling sorry for Mr. MI just because he couldn't help but order his Tomb<b>ST</b>one(Stress the ST) burger, you are going to propetuate the cycle.

    You are best not to learn bedside manner from me, I am a practitioner who does not regularly hand out pity.
  9. 5
    Quote from NeuroMedic
    Once again, let's wake up children. If you keep feeling sorry for Mr. MI just because he couldn't help but order his Tomb<b>ST</b>one(Stress the ST) burger, you are going to propetuate the cycle.

    You are best not to learn bedside manner from me, I am a practitioner who does not regularly hand out pity.
    I'll be the first to send out some sparks.

    The "let's wake up children", is not a professional way to speak to professionals. When I'm being talked to that way, my mind tends to shut and the message of what the person is saying begins to get lost, because it sounds like I'm being lectured to. and adds an air of superiority or arrogance that you might not have intended. Sorry just me.

    We are not to give our patient's pity or sympathy, but empathy without judgement, so I'm with you on that one.
    Last edit by Tweety on Oct 29, '07
  10. 1
    Once again, let's wake up children.
    Ouch.......!!!!!!!!!!!!!! That stung.......


    If you keep feeling sorry for Mr. MI just because he couldn't help but order his Tomb<b>ST</b>one(Stress the ST) burger, you are going to propetuate the cycle.

    You are best not to learn bedside manner from me, I am a practitioner who does not regularly hand out pity.
    I, too, am an NP and I do not "hand out pity". I do, however, practice emphathy with my patients.

    And, I don't see what this has to do with the thread topic: Short Cuts in Nursing

    ??
    Hellllllo Nurse likes this.
  11. 1
    And, I too do not "hand out pity." However, compassion goes a long way towards establishing yourself as a NURSE.
    Hellllllo Nurse likes this.
  12. 2
    Quote from Tweety
    I'll be the first to send out some sparks.

    The "let's wake up children", is not a professional way to speak to professionals. When I'm being talked to that way, my mind tends to shut and the message of what the person is saying begins to get lost, because it sounds like I'm being lectured to. and adds an air of superiority or arrogance that you might not have intended. Sorry just me.
    Not just you, Tweety. I was all set to agree with the OP (and I graduated from a DE program, so I know whereof I speak; it was a baaaad idea) but making a mistake does not make me a child, nor does it make me a bad nurse.
    Tweety and Hellllllo Nurse like this.


Top