RN with BSN and feeling stupid - page 2

by trueblue2000 8,323 Views | 56 Comments

I graduated 3 months ago with a BSN, passed boards and started a nursing residency. Almost everybody else in my nursing residency has ADN/ASN degrees. We have now been deployed to our units. We all do the same jobs, get paid the... Read More


  1. 6
    I'm not sure you studied twice as much !! ADNs have to pass the same NCLEX and cover the same material in two years !!! (Most programs go four to five days a week, all day)
    It's funny that you feel the way you do b/c I feel that with all my work I put in I only came out with an ADN . I now have to go back for my BSN b/c in NE Ohio that is what they want.
    You didn't make a mistake getting your BSN but please understand ADNs also out in a lot of work as well. Good luck in your practice.
  2. 13
    Quote from trueblue2000
    We all do the same jobs, get paid the same and are treated exactly the same.
    I'm interested to know how you feel an ADN RN should be treated in comparison to a BSN RN. Should they be required to work more weekends and holidays? Empty more bed pans? Have to park further away? Genuflect in the presence of BSN trained RN's? If you're doing the same job why should you be paid more? You don't have special expertise at this point. You didn't study twice as much and you passed the same exam to get your license. You are at a very basic level of nursing. I'm sorry if this sounds harsh but I've had it up to here with this divisive subject. I precept a lot of students and I hear the same garbage coming out of their mouths. We have 3 paths to licensure. Until that changes bashing each others' education does nothing to further our profession and smacks of school yard one up-man ship. If I hear how "unfaaaaaiiirr" it is from one more adult I swear I'm going to lose it. Perhaps I already have.
  3. 3
    It will come in handy at some point. Don't worry. As some have already mentioned, a lot of places prefer a BSN now, and a lot of people with less than a BSN are going back to school because they feel it's an advantage when trying to get a job.

    I got a BSN because it would've taken me the same amount of time (if not longer) to get an ADN so it only made sense. However, since I had no desire to be in management or anything, I thought at times there was really no big advantage. Now, I am starting to have almost crippling back pain. I'm really way too young to be having back problems, but literally all of a sudden, I can barely stand up without my back hurting. 30 more years at the bedside? That would be okay with me, but it's not looking likely.

    If I had an ADN, I would probably be needing to think about going back to school at this point so I can have a job in the future that's not so harsh on my back. Instead, I just keep on keeping on and my education is already there as a safety net. You never know when you might need it. Literally, if you had asked me even just three months ago if I might want to be a manager, I would've said, NOPE! Today, it's a different story not out of desire but maybe out of necessity.
    AutoRotate, MedChica, and silenced like this.
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    After much invesitation, I think the best route for me is the ASN, RN, BSN path. I really see no benefit to BSN, RN path. In fact, it seems counter-productive. But that is in my area where both are available. It comes down to a personal choice I guess.
    MedChica likes this.
  5. 1
    Quote from jetsy62
    After much invesitation, I think the best route for me is the ASN, RN, BSN path. I really see no benefit to BSN, RN path. In fact, it seems counter-productive. But that is in my area where both are available. It comes down to a personal choice I guess.

    I see two beinifits to the BSN RN path. First in todays nursing job market the new grad BSN will have a leg up in many or most job markets. Second with the ADN RN to BSN option you might find your self inelligable for some of the new grad residency programs without a BSN and when you do the RN to BSN you will still not be qualified since you are no longer a new grad.
    silenced likes this.
  6. 0
    Thank you for informative comments like these.. it was here on allnurses that I learned all the ins and outs of deciding which degree to pursue. Here in Nashville, Vanderbilt (largest employer in TN)has just started to implement the BSN requirement for new hire RN's as of 2013 I believe. The evolution of this field will lead to higher degree requirements and the trend is spreading.... like what 'danegerous' mentioned of it eventually requiring a MSN.
    I have read that there are certain states that now require BSN not to mention magnet status hospitals requiring a BSN.
    Is it right to think that these degree requirements seem to be the result of medicare and or healthcare insurance standards? I read somewhere too that studies show lower instances of mistakes for BSN's and that is why the requirement is spreading?
    I love learning on this site.. thanks to all!
  7. 1
    Thank you for informative comments like these.. it was here on allnurses that I learned all the ins and outs of deciding which degree to pursue. Here in Nashville, Vanderbilt (largest employer in TN)has just started to implement the BSN requirement for new hire RN's as of 2013 I believe. The evolution of this field will lead to higher degree requirements and the trend is spreading.... like what 'danegerous' mentioned of it eventually requiring a MSN.

    *** No it won't. It is already a tenous cost vs benifits with the BSN. Most nurses in the state where I live start around $20 and hour. Not bad for two years invested at the tech college. With university BSN programs costing $60K and up we are already at a questionable cost of training vs income as compaired to some other fields.

    I have read that there are certain states that now require BSN not to mention magnet status hospitals requiring a BSN.

    *** Actually neither is true. No state requires an RN to have a BSN. Some Magnet hospitals, like some non Magnet hospitals want/require a BSN. There is nothing about the "Journy to Magnet" that requires a hospital to hire BSN, or a certain percetage of BSN staff nurses. At the same time Maget hospitals are gaining reputations as not being good places to work in some areas.

    Is it right to think that these degree requirements seem to be the result of medicare and or healthcare insurance standards?


    *** I have seen no evidece of that being true. I have my own ideas as to why but so far as I know has nothing to do with isurance.

    I read somewhere too that studies show lower instances of mistakes for BSN's and that is why the requirement is spreading?

    *** The methodology of those studies is questionable.
    tokmom likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from jetsy62
    After much invesitation, I think the best route for me is the ASN, RN, BSN path. I really see no benefit to BSN, RN path. In fact, it seems counter-productive. But that is in my area where both are available. It comes down to a personal choice I guess.
    *** I addition to the other pluses I noted previously I can think of another one. For the new high school grad the university BSN program can provide the whole college experience. In an eviroment where new grads with either degree can find that first acute care job without much trouble, like how it was before 2008, the ADN RN, then later RN to BSN has HUGE and vast advatages over the traditional univeristy BSN programs. It is my opinion that the tremoundous advantage the ADN RN then later RN to BSN grads had over the traditional university BSN program is a big part of the motivation ad push for BSN only today. It had to cause a lot of resentment.
  9. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I addition to the other pluses I noted previously I can think of another one. For the new high school grad the university BSN program can provide the whole college experience.

    In an eviroment where new grads with either degree can find that first acute care job without much trouble, like how it was before 2008, the ADN RN, then later RN to BSN has HUGE and vast advatages over the traditional univeristy BSN programs. It is my opinion that the tremoundous advantage the ADN RN then later RN to BSN grads had over the traditional university BSN program is a big part of the motivation ad push for BSN only today. It had to cause a lot of resentment.
    As for the "whole college experience" ... yes, many of us consider that one of the big advantages to the traditional on-campus BSN entry programs. The student has the opportunity to experience the university culture, scholarly questioning, greater access to a wider range of supporting coursework, etc. at a university than at most (but not all) ADN programs. It's a bigger advantage in the long run than you may realize.

    As for the notion that people who got BSN's as their entry-level degree feel/felt resentment or jealousy towards the people who went the ADN route -- or that they ever felt that the ADN's had an advantage over them. I'm sure there have been a few people who may have felt that way, but that's definitely opposite from the way I remember those days.

    In fact, I have never known anybody personally who has felt that way. Everyone I know thought I was lucky that I could go straight from high school to a prestigious university and get my BSN at the age of 22 -- with no student loans (combination of parents and a scholarship.) People were envious that I could become a Charge Nurse in an ICU at the age of 22, get my MSN and become a CNS at the age of 26 --again with no student loans (working part time + financial aid.) I was never jealous or had resentment towards the ADN's, I always thought my path worked pretty well.
    silenced likes this.
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    In the context of bedside nursing - they are doing the exact same job with the exact same license and state credentials - so in that arena they should be treated the same (and unless you have sat in an ADN program, you really have no idea what they know and don't know).  However, you will be better positioned to get away from the bedside when the time comes.
    tokmom likes this.


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