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JSlovex2

JSlovex2

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  1. All the new grads that can't find a job... 40,000 paid to someone who never worked. There's your job. Gone.
  2. If religious people can be exempt from working certain days, does this mean people who aren't religious can be exempt too? What defines a religion anyway? Maybe it's my religion not to miss my children's school events. Since I don't ask to be off on Sundays, can I be off on a Tuesday or Wednesday if my kid is going to be in a play? I think religious exemptions border on ridiculousness personally. Unrelated, but this reminds me of when I worked with a lot of smokers, I used to tell my boss (when I was working in a restaurant) that I was going to go take an "I don't smoke break." I also thought it was funny when people who didn't believe in working on certain days would go out to eat. You don't believe in working on Sunday, but not enough that you'll stop supporting a business who requires employees to work? I never understood nurses who don't want to participate in blood transfusions either. Maybe instead of expecting everyone to accomodate your religious beliefs, you should tailor your job to your beliefs. If I didn't believe in abortions then I probably wouldn't apply to work in an abortion clinic. If I didn't believe in blood transfusions then I might not work at a hospital. Common sense trumps nothing, I guess.
  3. I disagree with the poster who says RNs who get a BSN aren't new grads. According to many hospitals (stated on their websites) any RN with less than 6 months professional experience is eligible for new grad residency programs. You will be a new grad RN BSN regardless of how long you've been an RN an been unemployed. Besides, if you're applying to jobs before you graduate with your BSN and right after then you will be, by definition, a new grad.
  4. JSlovex2

    STILL NO JOB

    @Sky You have to be aggressive during your training. It's just like when you're a nursing student - if you'll follow along and watch - that is exactly what the nurse will let you do. When I was going through my clinicals in school it was always a little weird walking up to someone I didn't know from Adam, especially when they didn't make eye contact or acknowledge my existance, but I would always be really assertive and say, "I don't know how much you're comfortable with letting students do, but I'd like to do anything you'll let me." I was the first and only student in many clinical rotations to get hands on experience doing many skills...hanging IV fluids, starting IV's, passing meds, flushing feeding tubes, etc. When it was time to do my final semester clinical I did the same thing when I met my nurse. She basically stood behind and followed ME. Thank goodness because of all the experience I got during my final semester, I went into the job force feeling pretty ready...although you're never REALLY ready. The next job you go into...act confident...even if you're not..and you won't be. Nurses are going to be "iffy" about giving control to someone who acts like they're not confident. Even if you have to ask 500 questions while you do what you do...YOU should be the one doing it. At least at the end of the day, your preceptor can say, "she passed meds. she did the assessments. she called the doctor. etc" Even if you needed a lot of guidance...as any new person does...it sounds a whole heck of a lot better than saying, "she watched me all day." You just have to get in there and do it. I can watch a video of how to do something 500 times and hear about something in lecture 4000 times, but until i do it ONCE..i don't know what I'm doing. I've been known to tell preceptors that very thing. Four days isn't a whole lot for anyone, but you'd be amazed at the difference between four days of doing vs. four days of watching.
  5. JSlovex2

    RN with BSN and feeling stupid

    It will come in handy at some point. Don't worry. As some have already mentioned, a lot of places prefer a BSN now, and a lot of people with less than a BSN are going back to school because they feel it's an advantage when trying to get a job. I got a BSN because it would've taken me the same amount of time (if not longer) to get an ADN so it only made sense. However, since I had no desire to be in management or anything, I thought at times there was really no big advantage. Now, I am starting to have almost crippling back pain. I'm really way too young to be having back problems, but literally all of a sudden, I can barely stand up without my back hurting. 30 more years at the bedside? That would be okay with me, but it's not looking likely. If I had an ADN, I would probably be needing to think about going back to school at this point so I can have a job in the future that's not so harsh on my back. Instead, I just keep on keeping on and my education is already there as a safety net. You never know when you might need it. Literally, if you had asked me even just three months ago if I might want to be a manager, I would've said, NOPE! Today, it's a different story not out of desire but maybe out of necessity.
  6. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    Actually, people can and DO wake up one day and decide they don't want to do drugs anymore! That's usually when they seek treatment...which is why it should be irrelevant to what's happening today. I get that the board is meant to protect the public, but in some cases, there is nothing to protect the public from. If you've had a lot of drug related charges and things like that then that's one thing. If your record is spotless and you voluntarily sought help then that is another. Chemical dependence and addiction are two VERY different things, btw. I'm sure as a nurse you know that. Even if they are concerned about someone who is addicted to illegal drugs, it's still shocking that they single out people who WERE dependent (NOT addicted) to prescribed drugs and then punish them because they sought treatment. If someone decided they were sick of doing drugs, went to treatment, turned their life around so much that they were able to make it through nursing school...including clinicals and internships...with NO problems...and no trouble with the law EVER then i don't see why they should be put into a monitoring program where they are treated like a criminal. In fact, it's the same program that people who HAVE done something criminal are in. What's even more shocking is that they do the same thing to people with mental illness. In this case...he won't be lying because the application doesn't ask about past treatment. Heck, if it did, then I might just suggest moving to another state that doesn't! I'm just shocked that this is legal..that's all. I've never heard of anything like it. Oh well.
  7. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    My goodness....I feel bad for you. I guess I never even thought of this or payed attention to what kind of questions were asked since it didn't pertain to me, but if a questions asks, "Have you been treated for mental illness within the past X years" then I would assume everyone who sought treatment for depression or anything would have to answer yes. That just seems a little overboard! Not to mention...if I were a nursing student with mental illness or substance abuse issues and I knew that would be a question...I would NOT seek treatment in order to be able to answer that question honestly! Really, it seems like they should be more worried about the ones who haven't sought treatment within the past X years as opposed to the ones who have. Lesson to nursing students who are addicted...keep on keeping on if you want to get a job! How crazy.
  8. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    How long is it until you are eligible for employment? And how long until you're finished with the program? Why were you denied licensure as a pharmacy tech? Did they ask questions about mental health for that licensure also? That really sucks to have to deal with all that. I can understand having to be in a program if you've been caught diverting or been impaired on the job, but being put into a program because of a medical diagnosis that hasn't posed a problem seems unfair. Did the school you went to help you with the application process or not? Someone had to sit down and go over the form with us. Did you know what would happen by answering that you had a mental health issue? Apparently as a nurse you just have to keep your medical problems and any medications you might take TOP SECRET and never, ever let anybody know - especially if it's a controlled substance.
  9. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    Didn't you say in another post that you only disclosed your mental health dx because you interpreted the question wrong? And it actually only meant if your dx was an impairment to your current ability to work? By the logic that everyone who has had a mental health dx or substance abuse issue within the past 5 years then every single person diagnosed with depression, anxiety, bi-polar or who ever had a DUI and sought treatment bc it was ordered by the court would be required to be in a monitoring program where they have to check in every day, take tests, etc..etc.. There's no way that someone who has never had a record and never had any trouble with an employer has to go through this grueling process where they have to attend meetings, take tests, etc. just because they went to rehab 4.5 years ago or had a bout with depression. I can see having to seek treatment if you are active in an addiction or if there was an incident r/t addiction or mental health, but it seems like a violation of ADA to order people with no adverse consequences of addiction/mental health to disclose their history and treat them differently because of it. Did your doctor say he didn't think you were fit to practice?
  10. JSlovex2

    Frustrated

    So, technically...if someone has a history of depression then they would have to report to the board when applying for licensure of a mental health history? That seems absurd! I saw another nurse post here saying that she was being investigated after making some errors at work and the board investigator had records of every pharmacy she had ever been to! How is that legal? Does the board have the authority to check the medical and pharmacy records of every nurse or nurse applicant even if they have never had any legal issues or complaints? I am just learning about this and it's shocking to me!
  11. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    Well, the DUI thing makes sense because most all employers want to know your criminal history and it's public information so it will show up on your background check. Asking if you've ever been treated for drug/alcohol addiction in the past FIVE years is right up there on the "isn't that a violation of HIPAA" list as "have you ever been treated for any psychiatric issues in the past five years." I don't see how it's any of their business, really. Doesn't everyone who gets a DUI have to go to some sort of treatment class? You would think every person who had a DUI would then have to say they've been treated within the past 5 years and then start their careers off being tortured by the recovery police. I'm guessing it won't be any issue anyway since it's not on the application.
  12. JSlovex2

    initial license question

    Hi all, I have a question for anyone who knows the answer. I have a good friend who is about to apply for initial licensure in the state of Tennessee and take their test. I can't answer the question for him because it's been awhile and I can't remember... Do they ask on the application in Tennessee if you were treated for alcohol or drugs in the past 5 years? They have the application in hand and said the application for licensure doesn't ask that question. It just asks about criminal offenses. Does the NCLEX application ask? Well, apparently they underwent outpatient treatment about a year ago with the intention of being 100% "rehabilitated" with no issues. The fact that this question might come up is a new revelation that's causing a lot of stress. I'm assuming if the application for licensure doesn't ask then it probably won't come up. I wouldn't think the test registration would ask that as that's something I would expect for the actual BON application to ask. I don't know for sure though. I read a little around the site and saw some people say that not every state asks that question. Anyone know for sure? Thanks
  13. JSlovex2

    Fictional vital sign charting

    i agree w you that CNAs should understad why it's important to be accurate, and YES, i do think some people are on autopilot. i felt like i flew right through my BSN program which was "accelerated" and i wonder how the AS nurses must've felt when put on the floor after their "education." i remember as a CNA when i would report abnormal vitals for a patient the nurses would always ask me to check manually. it didn't matter if i was running around chasing my tail with a sweat trail behind me and they were chilling at the nurse's station - they'd have me do it. i would always joke that i didn't think they knew HOW to get manual BP, but i found out it wasn't a joke.....they really didn't/don't know how. it's obvious.
  14. JSlovex2

    Fictional vital sign charting

    another issue. not only are CNAs not told this during training, but so many nurses would rather die than to let them know that their job actually IS important.
  15. JSlovex2

    Fictional vital sign charting

    my comment was in response to someone who mentioned that CNAs should get more education. hence, the comment that "along with more education comes more pay." if i had said "if CNAs were paid more to do vitals then maybe they would" then i could see your point, but that wasn't the comment i was responding to.
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