NY State may require nurses to obtain 4-year degrees - page 26

But some worry that an already severe shortage will become worse. New York is mulling over a requirement that would force all RNs to earn a bachelor's degree in order to keep their RN... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Quote from NYTramaRN
    Hey no problem. I'll gladly put my 27 years of expertise on the back burner and go back to school and get more edumacation. While, The patients suffer at the hands of nubee nurse with advanced degrees. They still don't get it: nursing is 1st and foremost a hands on skills profession. Pt care requires the touching of patients, and gets better as your comfort levels and experience increase.
    Geezeus, just what are they smokeing up in Albany

    Paul
    Maybe they will share what they are smoking
  2. by   christel
    you wanna know the stupid think, the only difference between the city college and the state college here in fresno is the state college offers 5 upper division general education courses, that has nothing to do with nursing...everything else is the same, program and all....
  3. by   burn out
    Quote from LandDRN
    Just a story. They put one of our BSN nurses (we're a pretty even mix here) as charge the other night ( as we were told because of her BSN , mind you she had never even been to/ worked a code.) In a nutshell a critical situation arised and two of us ADN nurses took over and ran the code. The morale of this story is that education doesn't always
    equal experience either!
    I don't know why it is always the ADN putting down the BSN. How long had the poor charge nurse BSN even been a nurse? Thank goodness she had you and the other ADN back her up but goodness a paramedic can run a code-nursing is not all about coding someone- hopefully it is about preventing one. In a bsn program you are taught a scientific approach to providing nursing care so that in any situation you can function. It is with this knowledge base that a new graduate enters the nursing world and then gets the experience. Granted the first year may be more difficult for the bsn nurse but in the long run I would much rather have a BSN caring for me.
  4. by   irishnurse67
    Quote from burn out
    I don't know why it is always the ADN putting down the BSN. How long had the poor charge nurse BSN even been a nurse? Thank goodness she had you and the other ADN back her up but goodness a paramedic can run a code-nursing is not all about coding someone- hopefully it is about preventing one. In a bsn program you are taught a scientific approach to providing nursing care so that in any situation you can function. It is with this knowledge base that a new graduate enters the nursing world and then gets the experience. Granted the first year may be more difficult for the bsn nurse but in the long run I would much rather have a BSN caring for me.
    I guess things in the college you attended are different than in the one I go to. I have my ADN now. While in that program, I learned the scientific approach to providing care. Now that I'm in the BSN program, all I'm learning is theory-type stuff. I'm not saying this knowledge isn't worth obtaining, it's just that I notice no difference in performance in the ADN vs BSN nurses that I work with.
  5. by   noelle07
    This has always really confused me. I am in an ADN program right now and it worries me a little. I had always planned on eventually getting my BSN, but there is no telling if I definatly will. In our clinicals there are nurses with BSN constantly telling us that we should have to get our BSN to be considered registered nurses. My thought is, we take the same exact board exam as them and are just as qualified to care for patients, with the exception of the management courses that are given in the BSN programs.
  6. by   Geeg
    I bet this legislation was encouraged by the universites... They get lotsa $$ for little outlay. These days school is all independent study or by correspondance quided by computers. There is very little Teaching or guidance out there anymore. They give you that "you're a professional and can guide your own learing" garbage.
  7. by   Otessa
    North Dakota used to require a 4-year degree and if you moved into the state you had a certain amount of time to get your Bachelor's degree-has that changed?
  8. by   Otessa
    Quote from 2ndCareerRN
    Good deal. If you want to be treated as a professional, why not require what is considered a professional degree. In just about every field I can think of that is a bachelor's , and in some cases a master's.

    bob
    I agree!!!

    we are a PROFESSION!
  9. by   Otessa
    [quote=pama]Just another attempt to eliminate the ADN program. In all the recommendations for BSN as the entry level they fail to inform the public and legislators the ADN program is the only one based on research. The research behind the implementation of the ADN is the reason the programs have been extremely successful for 50+ years and will continue to be successful!

    I am from a BNSc program that was way ahead of its time obviously. I graduated in 1992 and the ENTIRE program was evidence-based(research-based). I am wondering what proof or research you are alluding to in this statement "ADN program is the only one based on research". ONLY-no.
  10. by   burn out
    Quote from irishnurse67
    I guess things in the college you attended are different than in the one I go to. I have my ADN now. While in that program, I learned the scientific approach to providing care. Now that I'm in the BSN program, all I'm learning is theory-type stuff. I'm not saying this knowledge isn't worth obtaining, it's just that I notice no difference in performance in the ADN vs BSN nurses that I work with.
    Then why did you go back? I guess you get out of it whatever you put into it.I really don't mean to sound harsh but I really believe that the more knowledge you have the better anything you are-whetether it be a nurse or a brick layer.
  11. by   mojo23
    There are way too many factors involved in this debate. If NY decides to implement this, the state should most definately fund the education. Considering we are already overtaxed, I doubt this will happen. I always thought a BSN is a good idea if the program is put together properly and includes enough clinical and more assessment related classes-less emphasis on time consuming projects and papers. I make as much money as my colleagues so my BSN so far has not done so much for me in that respect. I did enjoy most of the program.
  12. by   lindarn
    Quote from mojo23
    There are way too many factors involved in this debate. If NY decides to implement this, the state should most definately fund the education. Considering we are already overtaxed, I doubt this will happen. I always thought a BSN is a good idea if the program is put together properly and includes enough clinical and more assessment related classes-less emphasis on time consuming projects and papers. I make as much money as my colleagues so my BSN so far has not done so much for me in that respect. I did enjoy most of the program.
    First and foremast, all ADNs and Diplomas need to be grandfathered in. The hospitals need to step up to the plate and sponser on site RN-BSN programs, for those that do want to earn a BSN. They have done this for pharmacists, they can do this for nurses. We have to demand it. The same program can be offered to the LPN/LVNS to move up to a RN.

    For class space, the community colleges (and on line programs), can offer the first two years of undergraduate education, and then the students can move on to a four year college to the last two years.

    In NYC, Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn has a BSN program that ONLY offers the LAST two years of the BSN. It has always been like this, and I lived in Brooklyn through 1979. My best friend completed the BSN program there. (present day NYers, is this still the case with Downstate)?

    Anyway, this would ease up some of the fear that there is not enough classroom space to accomodate these students. Findng more teachers will mean forcing colleges to pony up more $$$ for them. Cut back on the ever important football and basketball teams, and coaches.

    We have to include the public in these discussions. We have alllowed the hospitals and insurance companies to shut us out, and shut us down.

    The public has a vested interest in having enough licensed, educated, nurses to care for them. Along with safe staffing levels. We have to take this fight to the public and inform them what has gone on and what will happen if there are not enought nurses.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  13. by   irishnurse67
    Quote from burn out
    Then why did you go back? I guess you get out of it whatever you put into it.I really don't mean to sound harsh but I really believe that the more knowledge you have the better anything you are-whetether it be a nurse or a brick layer.
    The reason I went back is b/c it's been a goal of mine to have a Bachelor's degree ever sice I was a little kid. I also went back b/c I know that when I'm old, I don't want to be on my feet all day, running around like a chicken w/my head cut off. In other words, my BSN will open more doors to me career-wise. I'm sure you're right that I'll be a better nurse when I get my BSN, but I don't think it's going to better my clinical or assessment skills. Those you get from actually doing hands-on patient care. I know a few nurses w/their Master's who readily admit that they have never done hands-on nursing and would never dare do it, yet I know several LPNs who could run circles around most nurses, myself included. And again, I'm only stating what's going on at UNH, which is only one of many BSN programs in the country. Also, maybe I need to actually graduate from the program before this vast amount of increased knowlege kicks in. Personally, I didn't think everything really "clicked" until I'd been a nurse for several months. I know for sure that I won't think that ADN nurses are any less than me when I get my BSN. When I became an RN after being an LPN, I surely didn't think that I was any better. It all boils down to what the individual is, not what the degree is. Oh, and you didn't sound harsh!

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