Hospitals only hiring BSN's?

  1. 0
    when i interviewed for my current position as a student health assistant the clinical manager asked what my goals were. i explained to her that i am pursuing my adn. she told me that hospitals are not hiring nurses with adn's anymore and that you must have a bsn to be considered. is this true, or is it only for certain hospitals? i don't want to try to obtain my adn and not be able to use it.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights: Student Edition newsletter.

  2. 64 Comments...

  3. 3
    To answer your question Txhopeful13, Yes and No. It is still possible to obtain an RN position with only an Associate degree; however, every day that passes, more and more hospitals are beginning to prefer hiring nursing who have obtained a BSN. It is not impossible to get a great job with a RN-ADN, but I would recommend pursing a 4 year degree if you can. It took me almost 1 year to land my current job, with my RN-ADN and I would not have even received this position if I did not have an inside reference.
    ggfromnwk, TheSquire, and KimberlyRN89 like this.
  4. 4
    I definitely agree with Eric. I got my ADN, then my BSN just a few weeks ago. I have had a terrible time getting hired with only an ADN. A lot of it has to do with hospitals pursuing Magnet status (a certification by the American Nurses Credentialing Center). I do think there will come a time that the BSN is the minimum entry point for a registered nurse. Just my opinion.
    ggfromnwk, StephMom&RN, KimberlyRN89, and 1 other like this.
  5. 2
    In the Chicagoland area, most (but not all) hospitals prefer a BSN; however, some will hire an ADN and state they must enroll in a BSN within 6 months and finish in 5 years. The Chicagoland area has TONS of nursing schools and can be very, very picky! Do what works for you, but know that you will probably need that BSN, either as a new grad, or an RN-BSN. If you can afford it, I'd do the BSN right from the start, but if not, know that you can work as an RN, just maybe not in a hospital. To be honest, nursing homes pay more, but you really earn it!
    StephMom&RN and TheSquire like this.
  6. 0
    It depends on the area of the country but, as others have said, it's becoming more and more true by the day. I know my hospital will not consider ADN new grads unless it's someone with a previous bachelor's degree. Although now they may not even be considering those new grads.
  7. 4
    Quote from txhopeful13
    i don't want to try to obtain my adn and not be able to use it.
    hospitals aren't hiring a lot of bsns these days either. whatever degree you get, you should be prepared to work outside the hospital.

    by the way, when the economy picks up, hospitals that currently require bsns will start hiring adns again - just like they did before.
    KelRN215, CherylRNBSN, funky monkey, and 1 other like this.
  8. 0
    It all depends where you live. I work for the biggest hospital nerwork in St Louis, MO. When I got hired earlier this earlier I asked HR if having a BSN instead of an ADN conferred any advantage to RN applicants. They categorically said no, that they cannot afford to discriminate on that basis; that they have enough trouble hiring enough RNs as it is. There just isn't such a surplus of RNs in St Louis to be that selective. They would not be able to fill all RN positions if they only hired BSNs. But that is St Louis; I don't know how is the RN demand/supply equation in your neck of the woods.
  9. 0
    Quote from RCBR
    It all depends where you live. I work for the biggest hospital nerwork in St Louis, MO. When I got hired earlier this earlier I asked HR if having a BSN instead of an ADN conferred any advantage to RN applicants. They categorically said no, that they cannot afford to discriminate on that basis; that they have enough trouble hiring enough RNs as it is. There just isn't such a surplus of RNs in St Louis to be that selective. They would not be able to fill all RN positions if they only hired BSNs. But that is St Louis; I don't know how is the RN demand/supply equation in your neck of the woods.
    Is the market for RNs good in St. Louis? I am currently going to school in Texas but am originally from the St. Louis area and am considering going back after nursing school.
  10. 4
    Quote from MN-Nurse

    Hospitals aren't hiring a lot of BSNs these days either. Whatever degree you get, you should be prepared to work outside the hospital.

    By the way, when the economy picks up, hospitals that currently require BSNs will start hiring ADNs again - just like they did before.
    Im close to finishing my RN to BSN program. To be frank about it, if not for the recession giving healthcare facilities the boldness to start showing a strong preference for BSN grads, I likely never would have done it.

    I remember when the recession started and the talk about BSN prepared nurses becoming the min requirement followed. Many, including myself for a short while, said exactly what you are saying. I changed my mind though.

    First, and most importantly, the economy is not going to improve any time soon. I remember people insisting it would be a one year thing.......and that was three years ago. The media and politicians are working overtime trying to convince us things are slowly getting better. It is no coincidence that they are doing so during an election year. If it were not an election year, the reporting would be pretty much what it had been before: more job loss, unemployment running out and the nation is bankrupt. It is going to be a very long time indeed before we see any positive changes that are not the result of biased reporting.

    Then, when things do get better, the degree in which they do improve is going to be minimal. It will not be a case where we all walk out our front doors one day and enter a world that resembles pre-recession times. The America that stands before us after recovering from all of this will resemble what it is like today more so, with some slight improvements here and there.

    Further, said improvements will be in financial areas other than healthcare. We will get help through osmosis as our patients will no longer put off care, but not enough help to make up for severe compensation cuts. Insurances and medicare/medicaid will continue to save themselves by expecting us to provide better care for less.

    I considered/pondered all of this when I went into the RN to BSN program that I am now close to completing. It is what drove me back to the classroom. I think being more marketable is no longer a luxury but is a necessity for nurses and many other career paths. So far, the predictions I made that I believed in enough to act on them and return to school have held strong.

    I also predict that we BSN grads will be filling the roles ADNs used to take, and the competition for steady employment will become so fierce that ADN prepared nurses will be forced to accept lower salaries. It will be BSN vs BSN for acute care positions, ADNs will not be in the picture. In essence, BSNs will take ADN positions and ADNs will become the new LPN, but wages will be stagnant. Wages do not increase, but the education level of the people filling the role will. The end result will be increased requirements to fill the role without increased compensation. That's what the healthcare providers have been waiting for.

    To the OP: I strongly suggest getting your BSN. I am not one of those people who will tell you it will make you a better nurse. My opinion of my RN to BSN training is that it is a lot of formalities and posturing meant to make you earn a title. But, staying employed is enough of a priority to me that I'll tolerate it. Things are not going to improve any time soon, may as well be prepared for it.

    One last thing: I most definitely do not suggest entertaining the popular notion that ADNs will be "grandfathered" into keeping their positions once the push for BSN trained nursing is complete. I used to work as a travel nurse, and on two occasions I was brought in to fill in gaps on the schedule that were created when hospitals suddenly decided to do away with LPNs. One such hospital called in the LPNs and informed them they could go home, they would be paid for that day, and their positions had been eliminated. Some of them had been loyal to the hospital for >20yrs. They didn't get "grandfathered". Don't drink that poisoned kool aid. If you want more info on that matter, ask about it in the LPN forum.

    We all float down here.
    Last edit by PennyWise on May 31, '12
    CherylRNBSN, lindarn, ggfromnwk, and 1 other like this.
  11. 0
    at this level, i must admit the facility where i work we hired 12 adn the last past two years, and since then there's also talk about a magnet title for the facility in several meetings, which was brought to our attention that we will no longer accepting adn applicants. however, several of us including myself have fought this with tooth and nails, therefore, it's not set in concrete yet, time will tell :icon_roll


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top