Frustrated in BSN program - page 6

So I am tired of getting treated like an ignorant, useless nurse because I only have an ADN and denied employment everywhere because I'm not a BSN. I get into a BSN program and start taking EXPENSIVE... Read More

  1. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    1
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    And heaven forbid you got good grades too, because we all know no one is more clueless with the patients than a BSN student with a high GPA!

    To the OP- have you looked in to other programs? I know they vary in cost as well as general format. It seems like if you want to work in a hospital without relocating, you need the BSN, but maybe there's a more cost effective way to do it? The push to buy extra study materials is a bit of a red flag to me- are you going to a for-profit school?
    Of course! I'm sure if we were to take a poll using random participants, we would see that nobody would want a nurse with a higher education who graduated at the top of their class caring for them and/or their family members in the hospital!
    wooh likes this.
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  3. Visit  wooh profile page
    3
    Quote from hiddencatRN
    To the OP- have you looked in to other programs? I know they vary in cost as well as general format.
    I agree on other programs. I know of two state schools near me that offer bridge programs that are priced reasonably. One respected, one VERY respected. I think there are a couple others as well, but haven't researched much as I'm not in the market.

    And I understand it's frustrating doing something you think is useless. It's how I feel every year figuring out how I'm going to satisfy my career ladder requirements. But trying to have a better attitude about it really might help. If you try to have an open mind, you might actually learn something out of the time you're spending on it. Even if it is "just fluff." There's nothing to be gained out of insisting you won't learn anything and doing your best to prove that you won't other than more bitterness and resentment.
    tokmom, nursel56, and hiddencatRN like this.
  4. Visit  bubblejet50 profile page
    0
    My rn-bsn program is also ridiculously easy. I have even had projects that I had done for my adn required again in this program. I feel that the school knows we work as nurses and if we pay the money and do the motions we will get the degree. I will quit school for a while after my bsn (i have a 4yr old and a newborn) but will eventually go for crna or np so I figure I will just get it done now. On the plus side....its easier and less time consuming than my adn program!
  5. Visit  Pets to People profile page
    0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I think all ADN programs require anatomy and physiology I and II, but I don't know of any (although I'm sure they exist) that require pathophysiology.

    My BSN program required pathophysiology but I don't know if I'd even consider that "loads."
    Are you actually serious with this? You need to check your facts....the ADN is four semesters of nothing but pathophysiology, while the ADN to BSN is nothing but research based, no additional pathophysiology or even actual hospital clinical hours, atleast none of the ones in my area. The clnical hours for the ADN to BSN are all community/research based.

    And I don't think, I know, that ADN programs require A&P I and II so that the nurses will understand what the instructors are trying to teach them when they are accepted into the nursing program.
  6. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Quote from Pets to People
    You need to check your facts....the ADN is four semesters of nothing but pathophysiology
    Are you serious with THIS? As I already stated, I know plenty of ADN programs that don't require pathophysiology as a COURSE. Then, I provided a link to this forum where several ADN students say they aren't required to take patho and in some cases pharmacology. Furthermore, the difference in courses is one of the very important reasons MANY people choose the ADN program, or in some cases are forced into it after failing.

    It's not a big mystery or even a matter of opinion. Most colleges, both community and university, have a list of course requirements online which is viewable by the public.

    Furthermore, I don't say "i KNOW" anything when talking about something as huge as every educational institution on the planet....because here on this lovely forum...someone will find some online program that's based out of argentina and launched yesterday to prove what you KNOW as wrong.
  7. Visit  jacksonleo profile page
    2
    I am starting my last semester of my BSN and I totally agree with the OP... what a waste of my time, energy and money. I have learned ZIP ZERO from this program and I get so mad every time I have to fork out all that money every semester yet I will only get paid fifty cents more per hour once I finish it. It is all busy stupid work that I will never remember once I graduate. What a bunch of poo poo... though I can write one mean APA paper and do research like you would never believe! As if I am going to be doing any of that in my new job!! I got lucky though because in this area, no one will hire without BSN and I just got my first job and just graduated with my ASN (yes, I was in one of those concurrent programs where you do both programs at the same time, so just graduated with my ASN and now just finishing it up the BSN)... One more semester and I am done with the madness... Good luck all...

    I think it goes back to the seasoned nurses who have moved up to management at some point in their career and now they decide that the rest of us have to have BSNs to join the workforce... it is really just another way to stick it to us or simply another subtle form of lateral violence... just saying..
    PMFB-RN and JZ_RN like this.
  8. Visit  Aurora77 profile page
    1
    Why the assumption that because there isn't a specific course title that subject matter is not being taught? How would it be possible to get through any nursing program without heavy doses of patho and pharm? I went through an LPN course, then LPN-ASN, and am now in an RN-BSN program. I'm taking my first official patho course this semester. I was expecting something incredibly hard. It's review. Don't get me wrong, I study and read the book, but there's very little content that is brand new. How can that be since I've never taken a class with that title before? really curious, for those who insist ASNs don't get education in patho or pharm, how would nursing courses actually be taught without including those two subjects?

    I don't believe there is any such thing as wasted education. I have been shocked, though, by the actual lack of nursing courses in my BSN program. Up until this semester, it was paper writing, management type information. Useful, but not what I was expecting.
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  9. Visit  wooh profile page
    1
    So all you do is do some research and write a paper. If you aren't learning anything, perhaps you should have done a little more research for that paper?
    KelRN215 likes this.
  10. Visit  jacksonleo profile page
    1
    Quote from wooh
    So all you do is do some research and write a paper. If you aren't learning anything, perhaps you should have done a little more research for that paper?
    Well, I have a 4.0 so I guess I am doing ok...
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  11. Visit  Aurora77 profile page
    0
    Quote from jacksonleo

    Well, I have a 4.0 so I guess I am doing ok...
    For me that's the issue. I expected my BSN program to be harder, since it's higher on the academic food chain. If I had to rank my three programs, I'd say my PN program was by far the hardest and my proudest accomplishment. I am now really curious if I just attended an exceptionally difficult PN and ASN program and an way BSN program?
  12. Visit  GeneralJinjur profile page
    1
    The Colorado community college system requires all students to have a pathophysiology course as a coreq (even if they track out and become an LPN). Consequently, the state universities do not include a patho class in their RN-BSN programs. Just thought I'd throw that out there for those that are interested.

    OP, I hope your classes get better. I would be pretty frustrated if I were in your shoes.
    JZ_RN likes this.
  13. Visit  jacksonleo profile page
    2
    Quote from Aurora77
    For me that's the issue. I expected my BSN program to be harder, since it's higher on the academic food chain. If I had to rank my three programs, I'd say my PN program was by far the hardest and my proudest accomplishment.
    Yes... I expected the BSN to be applicable to nursing and to direct patient care but instead they have us do all this leadership, research and writing APA papers while no one in my class has even been a nurse for one day. How are we supposed to know how to lead and manage a team of nurses or implement evidence based interventions when we have not even been a nurse for one day???? but I know other nurses who are now seeking their BSN after having been a nurse for a while and they say the same, that it is mostly busy silly work that does not enhance their knowledge base...

    I want some of what these educator-people are drinking
    Last edit by jacksonleo on Nov 24, '12 : Reason: add
    Szasz_is_Right and PMFB-RN like this.
  14. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    0
    I always knew the LPN/LVN schools were tough. Every bridge LPN-RN in our program agreed. They worked 4-5 days a week, and schooled 5 days a week, and Exams were every Friday. No thanks. I wouldn't have survived that, and if I did, I would be at that level still because of academic vs. work burn-out. Not to mention, I had to work at least part-time, 3 semesters I worked full time (36hrs Baylor Nights). There wouldn't have been a chance that I could have swung that!!


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