BSN does not mean better... Sometimes education is overrated! - page 4

okay so here's my point. i have been reading several things on here about "i have my bsn so therefore i should make more money..blah, blah, blah" frankly i am sick of hearing it. let me give... Read More

  1. by   I_am_Julia
    education is never overrated.
  2. by   HeartsOpenWide
    I am in a BSN program. My med/surg instructor this year (who also teaches at the JC that has an ADN) told us that we were getting a better education than the student nurses at the JC she teaches at because we are taught more critical thinking skills. Some one argued that those at the JC get more clinical time so have more hands on experience. She said you can teach a monkey to do technical skills. That doing I.V.s, and the such, are things you can learn with practice (although we ARE getting this stuff in clinical so I am not sure what the concern is) she said that the critical thinking skills are more important. I am not saying that one is better than the other. This is just what my teacher told me and something some one said reminded me of it.

    You say that you are tired of BSN nurses on here saying they should make more or that they are better or whatever. Well I am tired of ADN nurses discrediting my education, saying I am wasting my time or that I am no more deserving of a quarter more an hour, or that ADN nurses have better technical skills or that WHATEVER. A nurse is a nurse is a nurse. I am tired of the bickering. When I was medical assisting no one said, I am better because I have an AS in medical assisting and you only have a certificate of competion. I do not understand the bickerng that goes on between nurses. My class gets along great, although I see the upper classes argue like cats and dogs, and I had a bad clinical experience this year (of which if I was nasty could blame say that it was because a majority of them were ADN nurses and they felt threatened, this were just nastyunhappy people, so sad)

    I could argue that BSN nurses are better simply because at my school you are chosen by grades, all of us that got in this year all had all As in our pre-requs with high overall GPAs. And it is a holistic program so we are not all just brains with no bedside mannor. The JC puts names into a hat, requiring only to pass pre-requs with a C. No one has failed out of my class. My friend who is at the JC said at least 4 have already failed out of his. The talk use to be that the JC turned out better nurses, but now that they are using the lotto system, our school is in favor. HOWEVER, I am not saying one is better than the other. Just pointing out that any side can make an argument. I am not getting my BSN because I think it is better. If I wanted to be a bed side nurse I would get my ASN, so much quicker and you learn the same skills as a BSN and the pay is the same. But I want to get my masters and work as a practitioner. But there are definitely perks to having a BSN vs an ASN; and I don't mean money; that is not why I am going into this anyway!

    Don' bash me I am just throwing ideas out there. I think both sides are great and that if nurses do not learn how to come together instead of tear eachother appart we are all going to be in a world of hurt. I am appauled. period.
    Last edit by HeartsOpenWide on May 18, '07
  3. by   fakebee
    :spin: As a bedside ICU/CVICU nurse for 12 years I have never asked my
    coworkers about their credentialing. My years in the Army taught me to judge people on their performance, not their rank, their educational status, their
    appearance or their hair color,etc. The bottom line is that I could care less if you are BSN,ADN, Diploma, work release or home schooled. All I care about is that you are safe,competent, a team player, and an Atlanta Braves fan. Well, actually 3 out of those 4 are mandatory. There's a reason we're called a health care team-our strengths and weaknesses balance themselves out collectively so we can do the impossible on a routine basis. Give everyone the benefit of the doubt until there is no doubt. Why make a tough job harder!
  4. by   KsEDRN
    Quote from fakebee
    :spin: As a bedside ICU/CVICU nurse for 12 years I have never asked my
    coworkers about their credentialing. My years in the Army taught me to judge people on their performance, not their rank, their educational status, their
    appearance or their hair color,etc. The bottom line is that I could care less if you are BSN,ADN, Diploma, work release or home schooled. All I care about is that you are safe,competent, a team player, and an Atlanta Braves fan. Well, actually 3 out of those 4 are mandatory. There's a reason we're called a health care team-our strengths and weaknesses balance themselves out collectively so we can do the impossible on a routine basis. Give everyone the benefit of the doubt until there is no doubt. Why make a tough job harder!
    I too was military for 20 years and agree. I chose an ADN program for several reasons.
    1. The ADN program in my area had the best NCLEX pass rate.
    2. I needed to finish school and start earning before my VA education benefits ran out.
    3. I was not interested in a leadership roll. Had enough of that.

    Our instructors were great and worked hard on our critical thinking skills and I think it made me a great nurse. I have only been an RN for 2 years, but have only seen 2 nurses fail there NCLEX, both from BSN programs... go figure.

    My husband is now going to nursing school and chose a BSN program because it was the program that accepted the most of his prior credits and he wants to go on to a Masters program after completion.

    Integrity, work ethic, team work, compassion & ability to learn from anyone are the qualities I look for in a coworker.
  5. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from HeartsOpenWide
    I am in a BSN program. My med/surg instructor this year (who also teaches at the JC that has an ADN) told us that we were getting a better education than the student nurses at the JC she teaches at because we are taught more critical thinking skills. Some one argued that those at the JC get more clinical time so have more hands on experience. She said you can teach a monkey to do technical skills.
    Tell your instructor to kiss me where the sun don't shine.

    Monkey, indeed.

    And I don't need a nursing instructor to teach me critical thinking. My parents and grammar school teachers started me along that road, thank you very much.

    That's why I declined the second year for the RN and have chosen to do it through Excelsior.

    (BTW, this isn't directed at you, just know-it-all arrogant asshat instructors.)
  6. by   RNDreamer
    OMG! That was too funny! Wow! I didn't know that there was even an issue about the different nursing programs until I found this forum..my baby sister is taking prereqs for an ADN program at a comm col. ...if I find out that any nurse is putting her down because her degree isn't enough, I will hunt them down with my BSN!!!! but seriously, suesquatch your post caught me by surprise, I just had to post

    Quote from Suesquatch
    Tell your instructor to kiss me where the sun don't shine.

    Monkey, indeed.
  7. by   Kelly_the_Great
    You know, I love nurses and value each of them, their contributions and their perspectives. I think we all have something of great value to offer.

    Unfortunately, we don't seem to believe we, ourselves, are worthy of the offer, I guess. We don't value and offer respect to one another.

    This more than anything, the lack of respect, concern and devaluing of one another disheartens me the most about the profession of nursing and its future.

    How will we ever conquer the challenges before us without eachother's help? We are our own worst enemies.
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Tell your instructor to kiss me where the sun don't shine.

    Monkey, indeed.

    And I don't need a nursing instructor to teach me critical thinking. My parents and grammar school teachers started me along that road, thank you very much.

    That's why I declined the second year for the RN and have chosen to do it through Excelsior.

    (BTW, this isn't directed at you, just know-it-all arrogant asshat instructors.)
    Oh I agree. I was just stating what she said to us. Point being that if my instructor is sayying this others may too. And they wonder why there is diversity/
  9. by   msdobson
    Quote from RN28MD
    Aids don't realize how busy we really are.
    You are now officially treading into the circular argument minefield.
  10. by   msdobson
    Quote from SNKerri
    I just have a quick comment...
    It seems as though alot of times we dicuss the ADN who has "been around the block" and therefore is more mature and has life experience. The issue that I wonder about and have experienced is the ADN that was 17 right out of HS and got thier ADN and now are working on the floor as a 19 yo RN. This SCARES me...at 19 there is NO WAY i was ready to take on the responsibility to be an RN. I think there may be a few exceptions to the rule but i dont know many 19 yo's that are ready for that. I would not trust my health or that of my child in the hands of a 19 yo whether they were educated or not.
    I experienced a group of 19 and 20 yo New Grads that came to ME when I was still a student and were asking me questions about med calculations and other things. It made me really nervous.
    What do you all thing of the BSN in this capacity?(just out of curiosity)

    You know, I would respond to that, but Tweety would hurt me again...

    ...and I'm such a delicate thing.

    Just look at my avatar...don't I LOOK innocent? (okay...forget the pitchfork...but LOOK at those EYES!)
  11. by   msdobson
    Quote from traumaRUs
    And...I did the LPN to ADN to BSN to MSN to post-MSN certificate and boy do I wish that I had just gone straight to the BSN! Would have saved me a lot of time and effort.
    Yeah, but look at all those cute letters you've got of a name now!
  12. by   msdobson
    Quote from stevielynn
    I too would have gone the BSN route - If I had been directly out of high school. I did go that route for a Social Work degree right out of high school.
    I, for one, am pathetically happy that there ARE so many ways into the nursing profession. I spent many years straight out of high school working to support myself and my daughter (no mother in the picture). I spent many more years (part-time) attaining a degree in English Literature. Then more years working. NOW, I have the time to pursue a second career (so-to-speak) but DO NOT want to sit through four (or more) years of school to get my BSN. I'm happy that I can do an 11-month accelerated LPN program, then a one year RN bridge program. Do I want a BSN?

    Nope.
  13. by   msdobson
    Quote from kstec
    I always enjoy reading the hierarchy of nursing forums. When I started my pre-reqs 6 years ago (one class at a time) when my youngest was 9 months old, I was so excited about going for my LPN. I know some of you are reading this saying "Well you do realize that your are at the bottom of the food chain". Well at the time I started LPN's were still in the hospitals and were tentatively going to be faded out. Well as time went on and money was short, I fulfilled my dream of becoming a nurse (LPN), we'll what used to be considered a nurse. Now from reading all of these forums I've come to the conclusion that alot of nurses tend to not be very nice and forget that not all of us had or have the opportunity to get our Bachelors or Masters, but are content with the fact that we went to school to help people. No I am not a RN, nor to I claim to be one, but I do have something to contribute to the healthcare field. I do believe in each tier there should be a pay difference, considering cost and knowledge, but to think that just because you have more letters behind your letter that you are better than me (LPN), you're not. Instead of having that mentality why don't RN's let LPN's assist and you mentor us instead of constantly belittling us. As for anyone who has a higher degree of education, I think it is wonderful and you deserve it for the sacrifices you made or didn't make, but for me the bottom of the food chain LPN, it just isn't presently in the cards and hasn't been in the past, so I will continue to be proud of my accomplishments and you be proud of yours (BSN, MSN).


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