Surveillance cameras in pedi patient's home? - page 6

I have been working this case for my 8 year-old private care patient for a few years. Her other two nurses have been there longer than me. We are considered family by her parents and they are very... Read More

  1. Visit  AdobeRN profile page
    2
    I worked a case where there was a camera in the room - on the dresser aimed at the bed (patient was total care, bed bound kid) - I didn't know about it until the previous nurse one night during report told me. Even though I feel I am a great nurse and don't take short cuts, do my job etc it still made me uncomfortable. After it was pointed out to me I would casually stack diapers or misc things in front of it as if I was cleaning up the area, stocking etc to block the view.
    realnursealso/LPN and hikernurse like this.
  2. Visit  LaRN profile page
    0
    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    We are professionals with licenses. Nanny cams make me nervous though I haven't come across them I'm sure you wouldn't have access to the tapes to defend yourself.
    good point. I too am used to cameras in hallways and nurses station, but never in a patients room.


    if something bad happens to the kid, i imagine those tapes will be scrutinized for any errors made, nomatter how minor.

    shady advice, but i would try to position myself between the patient and the camera when providing care.
  3. Visit  Elle23 profile page
    1
    Just because you don't see a camera doesn't mean there isn't one.

    I'm not sure why a nurse would purposely block a camera. What do you have to hide? At the very least it makes you look like you have something to hide.

    There is a video monitor in my patient's home, but I always assume I am being watched even if that monitor is not trained on me. Who knows whether there are hidden monitors?

    I can't say I blame any parent or family member for having monitors. I absolutely would do the same thing if it were my child. I have seen and heard too many horror stories about the bad things people do when they think no one is looking.
    ventmommy likes this.
  4. Visit  SDALPN profile page
    0
    Quote from Elle23
    Just because you don't see a camera doesn't mean there isn't one.

    I'm not sure why a nurse would purposely block a camera. What do you have to hide? At the very least it makes you look like you have something to hide.

    There is a video monitor in my patient's home, but I always assume I am being watched even if that monitor is not trained on me. Who knows whether there are hidden monitors?

    I can't say I blame any parent or family member for having monitors. I absolutely would do the same thing if it were my child. I have seen and heard too many horror stories about the bad things people do when they think no one is looking.
    I don't think its about hiding something. Its the creepy feeling of being watched. I have nothing to hide. But cameras make me uncomfortable, even in public places like a store or on the highway.
  5. Visit  Elle23 profile page
    2
    I understand. It did take some getting used to for me.

    I think a camera or monitor can serve as much for our protection as it does the patient's. If there is ever a question regarding care I have given, it is right there for the viewing.

    These days I think it's safe to just asssume there is a monitor or camera and act accordingly.
    bellcollector and systoly like this.
  6. Visit  KATRN78 profile page
    2
    Some of my patients have those baby monitor cameras. If Mom is watching, she has seen me doing the wedgy dance a few times.
    poppycat and anangelsmommy like this.
  7. Visit  anangelsmommy profile page
    0
    I know this is an old post but I had to weigh in on this. I am not only a mom but I had a child that had PDN for 14 years. I started with one camera with infrared with a monitor in my bedroom so I could observe if my child was having a siezure at night so i wouldnt have to run in for every little sound in the middle of the night. This after a 50 minute seizure stopped by 3 doses of meds resulting in aspiration and a very long hospitalization. The next camera was installed when I found out that narcotic medication had been stolen and the police told me that we could only press charges with actual hard evidence, and we didnt know who took it. I have to say that we also at the time had one or two nurses that would go into my childs room and pretend to read a book or such and with the camera I could see their novel or phone inside the book! and since they would close the door to his room, I would go in with laundry or something like this to let them know I knew what was going on. If my child was sleeping, I could have care less, by my child would be crying while they were there reading a book or playing on their phone! really, if that is what you want to do then I will sign you out and go home! My nurses knew there were cameras after the seizures started and I never used them for anything other than my sons safety.
    anangelsmommy
  8. Visit  anangelsmommy profile page
    0
    i just wanted to add that just because there is a camera doesn't mean there is video. The camera we had pointing at our sons bed, with the monitor in our room was live with no video. It was simply to be able to look and see if my child was seizing at night. Now when a nurse shuts the door to his room (no reason to do this and I stated on more than one occasion unless changing diapers we had an open door policy), then I would go take a look at the monitor. The hidden camera that we got when drugs were being stolen could be watched on any tv or video and recorded but was for the purposes of police surveilance. That nurse lost her license and was also caught at the hospital she worked for at the same time. And I got rid of that one immediately after she was caught.
  9. Visit  Adele_Michal7 profile page
    1
    I'm covering shifts on a case (2x a week) that can't keep a nurse to save their lives. They've gone through 73 nurses in a YEAR.

    Part of this is they have cameras. TWO in the patient's room, and others throughout the house.

    Honestly? I kind of hate it. It's unnerving as hell. And they watch the footage, and then come give you negative feedback based on what they've seen. (Usually petty BS.)
    SDALPN likes this.
  10. Visit  inmyshoes1 profile page
    2
    What do you have to hide? Almost everyone has cameras on them these days.. restaurants, grocery stores, drug stores.. You are the type of nurse I wouldn't want working for me. That's why we have cameras. Found out a nurse was YELLING at my 12 year old. A child that can do nothing, cannot even talk .. but he yells at him. We have to protect our kids. Im sure you would do the same if you were in our shoes.
    poppycat and smartnurse1982 like this.
  11. Visit  SDALPN profile page
    2
    Quote from inmyshoes1
    What do you have to hide? Almost everyone has cameras on them these days.. restaurants, grocery stores, drug stores.. You are the type of nurse I wouldn't want working for me. That's why we have cameras. Found out a nurse was YELLING at my 12 year old. A child that can do nothing, cannot even talk .. but he yells at him. We have to protect our kids. Im sure you would do the same if you were in our shoes.
    I agree that's uncalled for. No nurse should be yelling at a child. Talking loudly to a hearing impaired child could be different though. Most nurses are good people that parents have nothing to worry about. One bad experience can forever ruin trust though. I'm sorry you and your child went through that. At least we aren't all the same! But it is awkward to be watched as you adjust your bra strap at work...maybe not do bad if the mom sees it, but not so good if the dad sees it. So I see both sides. I'm sure telling the nurses a camera is there or having it out in plain view is a good enough deterrent from behavior like yelling at a child. Plus, I'd probably fix my bra strap out of view if the camera :-)
    poppycat and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  12. Visit  rnrg profile page
    2
    Quote from lovelane78
    Nope...the cameras are filming two entire rooms. It just is an invasion of privacy.
    Invasion of privacy? Our work space is SOMEONE ELSE'S home. I think parents and care givers deserve every right to check in on their child via Web cams etc however they wish. Their child. Their home. If you are a competent nurse and confident care giver than you should have no concerns regarding monitoring in areas of treatment. If they were placing cameras in private areas like bathrooms etc then yeah I see cause for concern.
    poppycat and smartnurse1982 like this.
  13. Visit  Girlafraid13 profile page
    0
    I believe they have the right to tape but only if the nurses are aware. I'm not taped at my job but if I were I probably would be a bit more "professional". I will hold my pts hands and have them play on their toy drum even though they don't understand what's going on, I mean I would be embarrassed if the parents walk in and hear me singing to their baby.


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