Whay is there so little support and so much backstabbing?

  1. While at work, I was told by my charge nurse that the techs were not suppossed to study while at work, that it had been a topic of discussion at the last nurses meeting, and that I was reported for doing it (studying). I should let you know that the nurse that told me this is in school also and had her backpack and by 3:00 am was studying as well. Now, I work third shift and I know all the nurses and I don't think any of them would turn me in. For one thing, no one has ever said anything and I have not been written up. I do my rounds every two hours, wash wheelchairs, check vitals, pass ice, and do my get ups without fail, so there is no complaint about my work and no one has ever said I was not working or taking good care of the patients. As a matter of fact, while other aides will see a call light go off and the patient is not their's they will come find you to answer it( even if you are in another room doing patient care) and will not just answer it themselves even when they are not busy. I don't do that. Everytime a light rings I hop up and answer it. Even if the other techs are sitting right beside me, I get up. Like I said, I do my work. If we have down time, why on earth can't I read my textbook? Would it be better if I sat there and read a magazine? I don't smoke, but I see how many smoke breaks people get and if they can pop out 15 times a night to do that, why can't I study? I should point out no one has written me up, there is no memo, and no one has told me to stop, just that they talked about it in a meeting. Why would they even be worried about that? I hope they don't make it a policy to forbid studying; the only reason I work nights is because of the downtime to study. I'll quit if they do. You'd think they' d be more supportive. :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
    Last edit by Lisa CCU RN on Nov 7, '05 : Reason: none
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   Race Mom
    Take a smoke break! Who says you have to smoke while you are on a smoke break? Just take your book outside, and read for 15 mins. If the smokers complain, they're just setting themselves up for not being able to take their breaks! I would go to your immediate supervisor and ask permission. I wouldn't ask if it were ok to do, I would just ask "Do I have your permission to study nursing material (that's what it is right?) when I have tended to my patients and there is a few minutes of quite time?"

    If they say no, then you will have to make your decisions, but if they ok it, ignore the other girls input and get your A!

    Good luck!

    Woogy



  4. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from Woogy
    Take a smoke break! Who says you have to smoke while you are on a smoke break? Just take your book outside, and read for 15 mins. If the smokers complain, they're just setting themselves up for not being able to take their breaks! I would go to your immediate supervisor and ask permission. I wouldn't ask if it were ok to do, I would just ask "Do I have your permission to study nursing material (that's what it is right?) when I have tended to my patients and there is a few minutes of quite time?"

    If they say no, then you will have to make your decisions, but if they ok it, ignore the other girls input and get your A!

    Good luck!

    Woogy




    Yes, it's nursing material, but I know it won't benefit them because I wouldn't be caught dead working in that nursing home after I get my degree.
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    While at work, I was told by my charge nurse that the techs were not suppossed to study while at work, that it had been a topic of discussion at the last nurses meeting, and that I was reported for doing it (studying). I should let you know that the nurse that told me this is in school also and had her backpack and by 3:00 am was studying as well. Now, I work third shift and I know all the nurses and I don't think any of them would turn me in. For one thing, no one has ever said anything and I have not been written up. I do my rounds every two hours, wash wheelchairs, check vitals, pass ice, and do my get ups without fail, so there is no complaint about my work and no one has ever said I was not working or taking good care of the patients. As a matter of fact, while other aides will see a call light go off and the patient is not their's they will come find you to answer it( even if you are in another room doing patient care) and will not just answer it themselves even when they are not busy. I don't do that. Everytime a light rings I hop up and answer it. Even if the other techs are sitting right beside me, I get up. Like I said, I do my work. If we have down time, why on earth can't I read my textbook? Would it be better if I sat there and read a magazine? I don't smoke, but I see how many smoke breaks people get and if they can pop out 15 times a night to do that, why can't I study? I should point out no one has written me up, there is no memo, and no one has told me to stop, just that they talked about it in a meeting. Why would they even be worried about that? I hope they don't make it a policy to forbid studying; the only reason I work nights is because of the downtime to study. I'll quit if they do. You'd think they' d be more supportive. :angryfire :angryfire :angryfire
    I don't see the big deal in reading a textbook, since you're doing all that you're supposed to be doing. I mean, it's healthcare related.

    Perhaps they'd rather you bring a Harlequin Romance book instead?:stone
  6. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    You can work and study with me anytime!!! If there's been no memo put out, and the NM hasn't spoken with you about it, I wouldn't believe it. I agree with the other poster, go and ask if it's okay. That way you know for sure. I don't see a problem with it and when I was taking pre-nursing stuff, I studied while working nocs at a NH.
  7. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Ok, so maybe if you put a magazine cover on the outside of your book, that would help?

    Someone probably got into trouble for not doing their job, and they are being stupid now.

    Just try to stay out of trouble until things calm down. ...I agree, take a non-smoking smoke break. lol
  8. by   ZASHAGALKA
    Addressing your topic generally and not specific to your situation:

    It's a high stress job. High stress brings out the best in people (as evidenced by the miracles nurses perform despite the roadblocks of available time placed upon them by 'throughputers' and staff 'flexers' in management).

    But.

    It (stress) also brings out the worse in people.

    There you go. (see, I answered that question without using the word 'catty'. I'm so proud of myself.)

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
  9. by   Fun2, RN, BSN
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    There you go. (see, I answered that question without using the word 'catty'. I'm so proud of myself.)

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    ...ummm, you used the word catty. LOL
  10. by   stressgal
    I had a situation just like this. Bringing in a big bookbag or huge nursing books can stick out like a sore thumb. Employers are paying you to work, not study. I too have worked third shift, where there is a lot of down time. A possible solution: I have found it quite convenient to stick notecards or folded study sheets in my pocket. These can be reviewed anywhere, during breaks, in the hallway and so on. I always carry study material with me to my clinicals as I hate to stand around with nothing to do. While not standing out as "studying" no one has ever said anything negative to me. It really helps you to focus your studies as well.
    Just a thought.
  11. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from stressgal
    I had a situation just like this. Bringing in a big bookbag or huge nursing books can stick out like a sore thumb. Employers are paying you to work, not study. I too have worked third shift, where there is a lot of down time. A possible solution: I have found it quite convenient to stick notecards or folded study sheets in my pocket. These can be reviewed anywhere, during breaks, in the hallway and so on. I always carry study material with me to my clinicals as I hate to stand around with nothing to do. While not standing out as "studying" no one has ever said anything negative to me. It really helps you to focus your studies as well.
    Just a thought.
    hmm, you could be right, I do bring in a big bag. But as far as my being paid to work, not study, I'm sorry but I DO work, more than others at times. We work third shift and per night I usually don't get more than 2.5 hours of solid study time because I'm up working and answering call lights. Despite what some people think, patients don't sllep at night; if anything they are up all night and sleep all day.
  12. by   LoriAlabamaRN
    I went through the same thing as a nursing student working nights at a local hospital. My charge nurse was horrible, and refused to allow me to study or even bring in a textbook to look at during lunch.

    Here's what I did: I bought several hundred note cards, and made flashcards about everything I needed to know- question on the front, answer on the back. During my shift I wore a white lab coat over my scrubs, and the notecards went into the left pocket. Every spare moment I had at work (even if it was waiting for someone to go to the bathroom) I would pull out a notecard. If I got the answer right, the card went into my right hand jacket pocket. If I got it wrong, it went back into the left. When all the cards were in my right pocket, I would shuffle them and put them back in my left pocket. I did this the entire time I worked there, and it helped unbelievably. The nurse never caught me "studying" and I was able to review all my material.

    Lori
  13. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from LoriAlabamaRN
    I went through the same thing as a nursing student working nights at a local hospital. My charge nurse was horrible, and refused to allow me to study or even bring in a textbook to look at during lunch.

    Here's what I did: I bought several hundred note cards, and made flashcards about everything I needed to know- question on the front, answer on the back. During my shift I wore a white lab coat over my scrubs, and the notecards went into the left pocket. Every spare moment I had at work (even if it was waiting for someone to go to the bathroom) I would pull out a notecard. If I got the answer right, the card went into my right hand jacket pocket. If I got it wrong, it went back into the left. When all the cards were in my right pocket, I would shuffle them and put them back in my left pocket. I did this the entire time I worked there, and it helped unbelievably. The nurse never caught me "studying" and I was able to review all my material.

    Lori
    Good advice. Thanks.
  14. by   karmyk
    Quote from stressgal
    A possible solution: I have found it quite convenient to stick notecards or folded study sheets in my pocket. These can be reviewed anywhere, during breaks, in the hallway and so on.
    This is what I did when I had to go to long meetings (where 90% of the stuff the discussed didn't deal with my office) or briefings/seminars (that i was only required to go to in order to fill seats so that it looked like the speaker had a full audience... so the briefings weren't even that important). I think in this situation, you're going to have to remain tactful (I'm assuming she's your supervisor). Little notecards or a tiny notepad with important things you want to review wouldn't hurt... one textbook to read during breaks and/or lunch also wouldn't hurt... but just keep it somewhat tactfully unnoticeable.

    If she's vindictive, if someone calls and asks her about you in, say, an employer reference sort of situation, don't give her anything she can use against you... because chances are she will if she's unprofessional and is having a bad day.

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