How many are going straight for your BSN?

  1. 0
    I just went through about 100 RN job postings, and I would say about 86 of them said BSN required or preferred. That was kind of a wake up call... now I am re-thinking everything again.
  2. 30 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    It really depends on your location. I am going for my ADN because I had a different major before nursing and when I was 18 I didn't take it as seriously or learn good study habits. My cumulative gpa isn't high enough for BSN programs (3.1), but my prereq gpa so far is (3.6). I am going to do a RN to BSN program right after. Where I am originally from (NJ) it is almost impossible to get a job in the hospital without a BSN. Now that I live in FL (at least 2 hours from a big city) they hire both ADN and BSN nurses here. It all comes down to where you live. Big cities are moving towards BSN requirements while small/rural places still may hire ADN nurses.
  4. 0
    Where I live, ADN's get hired just as quickly and easily as BSN, with very few places having a strong preference of BSN over an ADN. So I am going for my ADN, with plans to do a RN-BSN bridge soon after. Financially it was a better option for me.
  5. 0
    Me! I have looked at job listings as well, and most in the area I want to work in say "BSN preferred." I'm a sophomore and will hopefully start next year in the nursing program.
  6. 0
    Me!! I live in the Chicago area and it's almost impossible to get a job in a hospital unless you have a BSN...unless you want to work in LTC. I figure if I get my ADN I'll want to get my BSN eventually so why not just get it right away?
  7. 0
    I would say go for your BSN if its feesible for you, meaning money and time. I just went from LPN to RN and it took me having to work fulltime and school fulltime for the past 8 years and I only a have a ADN. Now I hate school and the thought of thinking about going back to take statistics, research and writing, make me want to puke! I say go for the BSN if you can. I currently work at a clinic so It really doesnt matter that I dont have a BSN. But in my area alot say BSN preferred as well so I know probably eventually I will have to go back. But I want to enjoy my life for now and enjoy not having homework, tests, papers, and clinicals right now.
    Last edit by Ella26 on Mar 19, '13 : Reason: spelling
  8. 0
    I'm going for my ADN because I dont have the expenses for a 4 year college right now. However, once I get my ADN and work for a few years, I'll go back to school to get my BSN. I hear some hospitals will help pay for you to get your BSN... idk my aunts a RN and she said that, I dont know how true that is though.
  9. 0
    I think anyway you get your Bsn would be good.
    It would be more streamlined to do it at a 4 year university or a hybrid CC/university program,
    because you don't stop the studying .
    Doing an ADN then RN to Bsn online gives same results and more flexibility choosing the school for the BSN portion. If you can get a job with adn and have employer pay for the Bsn that's a bonus.

    I'm not sure how much employers care about undergraduate schools. It's probably the graduate school that's worth the big bucks if possible.

    If your a career changer you may have plenty of cash saved up, but low Gpa to deal with.
  10. 0
    I'm going the ADN to BSN route because our local community college's nursing program is very highly regarded, not to mention better tuition rate I can do an RN-to-BSN at the local university, which is 10 minutes from home. I would have loved to just do a straight BSN at the university, but it's just too expensive to justify the cost. Especially when the CC has such a great program.
  11. 0
    I am short on time and money, lol. I am married and have three kids under 13, and my "plan" was to get my LPN, start working and do the LPN/BSN bridge program. We are a military family, so what they hire here, and what they hire at our next duty station is a gamble.


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