Can a teacher do this? - page 6

Ok so I had a midterm yesterday. I have been studying for a little over two weeks straight for this example. I would go over the material she has posted online (she likes to do everything on power... Read More

  1. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    I think at least some of the persons to whom you refer are probably bullies/eat their young, at their jobs, so they can not understand what you are saying. Thank you for your post.
  2. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    2
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    Now, instead of attacking the OP instinctively, we should delve a bit deeper into her circumstances. I would like to know what the class average for the midterm was. If it were a passing average, but the poster did terribly then yes, maybe she is whining, has bad study habits or both. BUT, if on the average the class did poorly, then she is likely NOT whining.
    Theoretically, most classes perform on a normal curve. Some people will be on the high end, others will fail horribly, and the majority lie in the middle. But in other classes, this is not the case. You can't just blame the teacher or the test. In my pharmacology class this summer, the majority of people failed. Why?

    It was NOT my teacher's fault because she:

    1) Marked each drug we were to know with a "Key" symbol on the Powerpoints. This was reiterated throughout the course.

    2) Made the PowerPoints available to students online, with links to Youtube videos and relevant dosage calculation self-help sites.

    3) Told relevant stories about her experiences in nursing and how the drugs were used in different settings.

    4) Always reviewed A&P of whatever system before we talked about the drugs-- she wanted to make sure that we understood what was normal, what could go wrong, and how to fix it.

    5) We did case studies-- determining what drug would be relevant for what conditions.

    6) Reviewed the test questions after every exam and allowed us to contest unfair questions. She even generously dropped questions that a bunch of people missed.

    7) She provided us with study tools: she said to make drug cards, study the drugs by class, read the textbook well and understand that drugs can have side effects that are simply magnifications of the desired effects.

    8) Had frequent office hours, offering to help anyone who was struggling.

    9) WROTE FAIR TESTS. It was not as if she pulled the material out of nowhere. These drugs were in our textbook, highlighted as key drugs, and discussed at length. Example: "What is the most common side effect in patients taking nitroglycerin (Nitrostat)?" Answer: Headaches

    Is it really her fault that over half her class failed? She pretty did everything in her power, short of telling us the answers to the test. The day before the test, she had a special Powerpoint with hints and practice questions for the exam.

    So was it because students simply didn't get that pharmacology was a whole new ball game, where you couldn't just get by with cramming the night before? It's likely.
    Last edit by nguyency77 on Nov 23, '12
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  3. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    2
    I apologize for the double post, but it irks me when people blame their teachers first without evaluating their own shortcomings.

    I have an A&P teacher who is very brilliant. He has a PhD in biology and spends his days contemplating the latest literature in his field. He wrote the A&P textbook we use in class, and he pretty much regurgitates his manuscript onto his PowerPoints, which he almost always reads verbatim. This is not always helpful, but sometimes I hear bits in his lecture that were not mentioned in the book. These bits of info sometimes clear the mind fog I experience when reading the text.

    This man enjoys failing students who don’t abide by “The Law of the Farm” (please read the article I’ve linked to at the bottom of the post), but he enjoys rewarding students who put in the work and go the extra mile to learn the material.

    I was determined not to give him the satisfaction of thinking, “This student is just like all the others—she doesn’t care if she learns the actual A&P. She just cares if she gets a C or better, so she can go on with the program. Sigh.” So I study my butt off, ask for help, surf the Web for resources, and go to office hours if I bomb a quiz. I did very well because I put in the work and correct my mistakes. I started off doing badly on the quizzes because I listened to hearsay about this teacher and blamed him for not preparing us well.

    @britney705—I don’t think that’s the case. The reason why I said what I did to the OP was to lend her realistic support from someone who has seen a hundred other would-be-RNs fail all their classes because they wouldn’t accept responsibility.

    I would hate to see the OP waste time blaming her teacher, when she could be using the time to study and absolutely destroy her next test. While all her classmates are whining about how it isn’t fair and that they aren’t responsible for failing, the OP could be getting A’s and be well on her way into a nursing program.

    OP: I suggest you read this article. It's pretty short.
    The Law of the Farm: Law of the Farm (S. Covey, 1994)
    Last edit by nguyency77 on Nov 23, '12 : Reason: Added something.
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  4. Visit  x_factor profile page
    2
    Quote from nguyency77
    I apologize for the double post, but it irks me when people blame their teachers first without evaluating their own shortcomings.

    I have an A&P teacher who is very brilliant. He has a PhD in biology and spends his days contemplating the latest literature in his field. He wrote the A&P textbook we use in class, and he pretty much regurgitates his manuscript onto his PowerPoints, which he almost always reads verbatim. This is not always helpful, but sometimes I hear bits in his lecture that were not mentioned in the book. These bits of info sometimes clear the mind fog I experience when reading the text.

    This man enjoys failing students who don’t abide by “The Law of the Farm” (please read the article I’ve linked to at the bottom of the post), but he enjoys rewarding students who put in the work and go the extra mile to learn the material.

    I was determined not to give him the satisfaction of thinking, “This student is just like all the others—she doesn’t care if she learns the actual A&P. She just cares if she gets a C or better, so she can go on with the program. Sigh.” So I study my butt off, ask for help, surf the Web for resources, and go to office hours if I bomb a quiz. I did very well because I put in the work and correct my mistakes. I started off doing badly on the quizzes because I listened to hearsay about this teacher and blamed him for not preparing us well.
    ^^ A thousand times this. Whether it's pre-reqs or nursing classes, some classes are just plain tough period. And not every teacher is going to tell you every. single. thing. on the test. Only so much can be discussed in one class period, that is why it is the student's responsibility to read their text, ask questions, study, and read the text some more.

    My psychology teacher is similar to the A&P teacher mentioned above. She has a Ph. D. in psychology and is just plain difficult. Passionate, and kind, but difficult. We started with 70 students, we're down to about 25, and half of those are failing. Half the students like her a little bit, the other half can't stand her. I LOVE her. She is passionate about what she teaches but let's face it, she can only teach so much in one class period. She goes over what'll be on the test, highlights the important facts, TELLS US TO READ THE BOOK and reviews before test day. And most of the class still bombs the exams. I have an A in the class and constantly get asked how am I passing the class. Simple. I study, I read the book like the very exam depends on it, and I am constantly in her office. I go to her for clarification of even the most miniscule details to make sure I am understanding it correctly. It's almost the end of the semester, and we're on a first name basis and she's even my letter of recommendation for the nursing program I am applying to next semester.

    While other students are blaming the teacher for their short-comings, I am exceling in the class. If I can do it, the other students can do it. The difference is, they refuse to, and want to blame her for their failing when it's really their refusal to adequately use all the resources available to them. They don't read their book, they cram the night before, and most of them don't even know where her office is located.

    You are responsible for your own success, even with the most difficult teachers.
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  5. Visit  nguyency77 profile page
    3
    Quote from x_factor
    While other students are blaming the teacher for their short-comings, I am exceling in the class. If I can do it, the other students can do it. The difference is, they refuse to, and want to blame her for their failing when it's really their refusal to adequately use all the resources available to them. They don't read their book, they cram the night before, and most of them don't even know where her office is located.

    You are responsible for your own success, even with the most difficult teachers.
    Thank you!
    Yes, it sucks. It can be a humbling experience when you can no longer get away with not studying for a test or doing it at the last second.

    Good luck with your studies, OP.
    loriangel14, x_factor, and sharpeimom like this.
  6. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    3
    Quote from loriangel14
    We HAVE been suggesting something. Study it all.Your teacher is not going to "direct" you to all the answers. You need to take responsibilty. The teacher will not direct you to every single word you need to study. The CRNE will be based on all of it.

    Then what good is the teacher? The way most of you put it, the teacher's job is technically carried out if s/he tells their students "Everything in the text is fair game. Make sure you study it all!," and then just stays on "Facebook"..er...I mean "ALLNURSES" all day lol (Just a little joke there. I feel I have to point that out as sometimes I think posters are robots (and may not get it) simply giving advice by echoing what they've heard all their lives, but refuse to think for themselves. And I'm not meaning to insult anyone here, guys/ladies, I swear I'm not. It just upsets me when educated people-NURSES for the love of GOD-just support the status quo whether it is right or wrong).

    I don't care if that is just the way it is, either. If the Academic institution will not force the instructors to do actually do everything in their power to help their students absorb necessary knowledge (you know, like the student is paying for?), then perhaps the powers that be can just drop the "Classroom instruction" classes from the Degree requirements. After all, "It is up to the student to study everything anyway," right? They can replace those classes with more clinicals and special program requirements. Then, the students can save money by not paying for a class with a useless instructor, but still come out ahead due to more specialized training.
    Last edit by PRICHARILLAisMISSED on Nov 25, '12
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  7. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    0
    Quote from sharpeimom
    All professors are required to have office hours. Use them! If they aren't convenient for you, most faculty will meet you outside those hours and in offbeat places like the student union, classrooms, etc. I know my husbandhas met students all kinds of unusual spots at times that worked for the student. Don't be afraid to ask.
    But Ma,am, the OP says she has tried to speak to her professor during office hours. She was told (paraphrasing) that unless the OP ask a specific question, s/he cannot answer it. Now I ask you, "What kind of bull is that!!?!!" As a student, The OP may not know what specific questions to ask. Is it not the professors responsibility to help her find the correct questions? Or is it ok for her/him to know that their student is having trouble but not lift a finger to help-even after the help is asked for!

    The way you describe your husband, Ma'am, I hope I have someone like him for an instructor when I start taking the tougher classes. If he does for his students what you say he does, I have no doubt that he would be sick to his stomach if anyone ever accused him of pulling the stuff that the OP's instructor is pulling.
  8. Visit  itsnowornever profile page
    1
    And in all fairness, if the OP asked "is this a good teacher" we would have said no. That's not what was asked. "Is this fair" and "can they do this" is what was asked. Yes the OP is a pre-req student however posting here leads one to believe he/she is on a nursing path hence the replies.
    elkpark likes this.
  9. Visit  newhospicern profile page
    3
    I actually agree with you that it's a cop out when a teacher doesn't teach. That is their job and what our very expensive tuition pays for. I do agree that instructors can't go in depth on every subject-- but they should be doing a lot more than reading off of the power-point supplied by the text book publisher.

    We had a quiz in an online class that has given no instruction, and the quiz had questions that she must have pulled from thin air since they weren't covered in the book or any of the reading materials given to us. When questioned, the teacher said, "sorry, but we don't spoon feed the information-- it's your responsibility to know this stuff"... WHAT? Well, it's your responsibility to teach-- especially if you want us to know information outside of the assigned reading.
  10. Visit  PRICHARILLAisMISSED profile page
    2
    Quote from itsnowornever
    And in all fairness, if the OP asked "is this a good teacher" we would have said no. That's not what was asked. "Is this fair" and "can they do this" is what was asked. Yes the OP is a pre-req student however posting here leads one to believe he/she is on a nursing path hence the replies.
    Fair enough. Those were her specific questions. But no one just said "Yes, the teacher can do that," "No it isn't fair." What they are adding is "You're an adult now!" or "It is your responsibility to learn everything." The OP also says that she believes she should get the education she is paying for (you know, clarification and real life personal examples of the text book information), but no one addresses that unless they're telling her to "Get over it. That's just the way it is." And that's weak! Oh, about "You're an adult now," does that mean that you all think that the professor should just do the bare minimum of what is required by the University-which is, apparently, to show their faces in a classroom and click a slide and read it,- but NOT what is needed by the (paying) student?
    Last edit by PRICHARILLAisMISSED on Nov 26, '12
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  11. Visit  rubato profile page
    0
    Quote from PRICHARILLAisMISSED
    Oh, about "You're an adult now," does that mean that you all think that the professor should just do the bare minimum of what is required by the University-which is, apparently, to show their faces in a classroom and click a slide and read it,- but NOT what is needed by the (paying) student?
    Of course not. I was only addressing the questions posed by the OP. I was also addressing her later comments. I would not want that type of professor either. We have one or two like that in my nursing program. They aren't fun and I have a lot more teaching to do to get myself ready for their portion of our tests. Thankfully, I have other, wonderful professors.

    However, when the OP asked for our opinions on whether her teacher "could" do what she did, we gave her our opinion that, yes, she can. And, in order to get through that class, the OP needs to do more.
  12. Visit  Kimynurse profile page
    0
    I read only some posts
    You asked for help, so how about using her pp as a guide, and fill in with Beeefier info from book.

    If she goes over lets say cranial nerves and just says names, and one thing about them.
    Look up in book, and add to the pps.

    Good luck, it would of been nice if she said that in class.
  13. Visit  Stephalump profile page
    2
    Quote from rubato

    Of course not. I was only addressing the questions posed by the OP. I was also addressing her later comments. I would not want that type of professor either. We have one or two like that in my nursing program. They aren't fun and I have a lot more teaching to do to get myself ready for their portion of our tests. Thankfully, I have other, wonderful professors.

    However, when the OP asked for our opinions on whether her teacher "could" do what she did, we gave her our opinion that, yes, she can. And, in order to get through that class, the OP needs to do more.
    Exactly. The OP cannot do anything about a teacher who doesn't cover all the material in lecture. I cannot do anything about a teacher who doesn't cover everything in lecture. Yes, they CAN do that. What the OP CAN do is adjust. A NS Adcom isn't going to erase a grade brought about by a teacher who didn't give you an excellent educational value for your money. The most important thing to do is to readjust to get what you want out of life.
    nguyency77 and loriangel14 like this.

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