doing the work of a CNA at a lesser pay - page 2

I'm a first year nursing student. I just got a job as a one on one caregiver for seniors. Some of the cases require CNA quality care, which, I've mostly been trained for, but I am in no way... Read More

  1. Visit  pixiestudent2 profile page
    0
    CNAs make like 10-12 dollars an hour, but also take care of more than one patient.
    Also I am not sure why you think you wouldn't be qualified to work as a caregiver. You have more knowledge and skill than a cna who took a two week course...
  2. Visit  wish_me_luck profile page
    0
    Yeah, I agree with the people who ask what you thought they made. I worked as a PCT and I made $7.50/hr. CNAs made 50 cents more than me. I think people are starting to find out what people in health care really make and how much work it really is. I remember a patient that thought I made at least $12 an hour because that's what a family member of theirs made in a city. And yes, the patient brought money up, not me. It's like nope, I don't make the big bucks.

    In a small/medium size town/"city" here's about what to expect (give or take a little)

    PCT/CNA: $7.50-$8 or $9 per hour
    LPN: Depends...clinic or office about $12/hr, LTC has to be like $18 or $20 something an hour (I haven't heard about LTC, just a guess)
    Nurse (registered, not meaning to offend but on the computer I am on, the capital "r" doesn't work): If you are a new grad where I am, it's $18/hr base pay. If you have experience, work in a critical care area, or work nights, it goes up. If you have experience/not new grad, it is about $21-24/hr. If you work LTC, I think it is more. Not exactly sure how much more, but LTC usually pays more, but you get more work.

    What do you think?
  3. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    UMM...when I worked as a CNA, I made minimum wage and I worked on a SUPER BUSY med/surg floor where I was constantly in C-diff poop and every other bodily fluid. It's a complete disgrace that assistants are valued so little, and then people wonder why they "can't keep good help." I did it for a little over a year and I don't know how I even lasted that long. Btw, I had a 4 year degree BEFORE I became a CNA and worked minimum wage as a slave basically. SOO, I'm sure you're more than qualified to clean poop too.
  4. Visit  funtimes profile page
    0
    Have you learned basic nursing skills like making an occupied bed, perineal care, transferring, bed baths etc? If so you are qualified. That doesnt mean you wont struggle when doing it on real patients at first, but so do new CNAs. Simply having the title CNA doesnt bestow magical powers on someone. A newly minted CNA probably doesnt know much more than you do. They do pass a practical skills test(that some RNs ive come across would probably fail), but in terms of knowledge you probably already possess more.

    This also doesnt quite seem like CNA work either to me. If you were a CNA, theyd have you doing the same cares on 6 to 12 people at a time instead of just one.
  5. Visit  thelittledoe profile page
    1
    I hope all these people aren't deterring you from continuing in your path. It seems there is a lot of know-it-all negativity on this website. And even though these members probably know what they are talking about from experience, they have no reason to be negative toward your questions and curiosity.

    Typically in NJ non-certified aides made a dollar less than certified aides, depending on which shift is worked. This is usually around $10 for non and $11 for certs. NJ is actually a pretty expensive state to live in so this is by no means enough to live on. I will say though, that if body fluids are not your cup of tea, you may want to rethink your path. As someone else said, RNs will have to know how to and be able to do all of the work anyone beneath them is capable of.

    On a different note, if your job description begins to include more and more things I would explain this to your supervisor and ask him to consider giving you a raise. To me if you did not have to do certain tasks when you began and are now required to do them, you deserve a raise. Even if that is only a 25c raise.

    Good luck and keep your head up!
    AspiringNurseMW likes this.
  6. Visit  mbrookeCCRN profile page
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    RNs start at $18 an hour?! I started at $15 as an HCT (aka PCT). HCTs that have been here for a few years make significantly more than that. It's crazy how much salary varies by area.
  7. Visit  crichards00 profile page
    0
    Actually CNA's DO hold a license that you CAN lose! It's called CERTIFIED for a reason.
  8. Visit  Bobmo88 profile page
    1
    Certification and licensure are not the same thing.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  9. Visit  Bobmo88 profile page
    2
    Certification and licensure are not the same thing.
    Hygiene Queen and BrandonLPN like this.
  10. Visit  adoRNo2b2015 profile page
    0
    Bobmo88.

    Does phlebotomist class teach you iv access or just drawing blood? I am considering applying to an ED Tech position but I'm an OB Scrub Tech, not an EMT perse. I will be starting nursing school in the fall and I know I will learn about this things but probably not until the second semester. What do you think?
  11. Visit  Bobmo88 profile page
    0
    Quote from adoRNo2015
    Bobmo88.

    Does phlebotomist class teach you iv access or just drawing blood? I am considering applying to an ED Tech position but I'm an OB Scrub Tech, not an EMT perse. I will be starting nursing school in the fall and I know I will learn about this things but probably not until the second semester. What do you think?
    Hello! It teaches you how to draw blood, do finger sticks and what the order of draw is for tubes. The technique for starting IVs is different but I think having phlebotomy experience will help you when learning to start IVs.
  12. Visit  Glycerine82 profile page
    0
    Quote from Floridayz
    Where I live, completion of a nursing fundamentals course = CNA certification. This may be different for you, I don't know, and I certainly wasn't trying to be mean. However I do believe that the knowledge you have being a nursing student is waaaaaaaaaaaay more than someone who took a weekend CNA course and therefore you are more than qualified for that type of assignment. It doesn't sound clinically *heavy* to take care of one incontinent patient. You state yourself that you CAN do this job, so it's up to you to determine what it's worth. Wages in this area, you would probably make in the $8-9/hour range for this type of work.
    It's way more than a weekend (160 hours to be exact) and a couple of semesters in nursing school doesn't give you the hands on experience required. It isn't hard, but you can't learn it from a book.

    "No day but today"
  13. Visit  Miiki profile page
    1
    Quote from crichards00
    Actually CNA's DO hold a license that you CAN lose! It's called CERTIFIED for a reason.
    It is not a license. It is a certification.

    It is required in every situation to be licensed as a nurse to practice as a nurse. It is not required in every situation by law to be a CNA to work in a nursing assistant role. Nursing homes are required to hire CNAs for Medicare reimbursement purposes, but again, not everyone with the title NA/PCA/PCT is a CNA.
    Last edit by Miiki on Jan 29, '13
    Hygiene Queen likes this.

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