Nurse: 'I was fired for refusing flu shot' - page 16

by DesertRN2 61,514 Views | 266 Comments

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  1. 0
    I can tell from reading this thread that many nurses feel as I do. That's the thing. In order to do this I have to change my beliefs. Basically, it's someone getting inside my head telling me what I must believe and do to be a good nurse.
  2. 8
    Quote from imjustme123
    I can tell from reading this thread that many nurses feel as I do. That's the thing. In order to do this I have to change my beliefs. Basically, it's someone getting inside my head telling me what I must believe and do to be a good nurse.
    No they're not.

    We wear gloves as a precaution. Vaccines are a precaution. This is not an ethical or moral dilemma. I just got my first every flu shot last year and the conversation with my NP went something like this:

    NP: You need a Flu shot.
    Me: But [insert name of cool, young, attractive NP] I've never gotten one, why do I need one?
    NP: Because if you're going to be a nurse you have to put other people first. Besides what's the worst that could happen Crazed?
    Me: California could break along the fault line and fall off into the ocean.
    NP: That's going to happen anyway but at least you'll have a flu shot.
    Me: I have no counter argument to this.
    loveoverpride, jadelpn, mmm333, and 5 others like this.
  3. 1
    They want us to think critically. Well, I'm a pretty critical thinker. Vaccines and glove wearing are not the same thing. I am taking a risk when I have something injected into my body. And, a patients life is NOT more important than my own. We are both people and our lives are each as important as the other.

    Your conversation with the nurse barely scratched the surface of this issue.
    Anne36 likes this.
  4. 2
    Biggest reason to get vaccinations including flu shot: Prevention death.

    I guess growing up in 50's and 60's when we had childhood friends one day then 2 weeks later gone from measles, flu, whooping cough and having brother barely surviving 4 month interval battling several childhood diseases make me beat it to the PCP office for ongoing vaccinations /flu shot.
    Or it could be the 100 + employees I'll be giving flu shots to in October.


    From Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:
    Welcome to the Vaccine Education Center

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Vaccine Education Center provides complete, up-to-date and reliable information about vaccines to parents and healthcare professionals. We provide videos, informational tear sheets, and information on every vaccine.

    Our resources explain how vaccines work, how they are made, who recommends vaccines, when they should be given, if they are still necessary, and, most importantly, if they are safe.

    Vaccines changed medicine

    Vaccines have literally transformed the landscape of medicine over the course of the 20th century. Before vaccines, parents in the United States could expect that every year:

    • Polio would paralyze 10,000 children.
    • Rubella (German measles) would cause birth defects and mental retardation in as many as 20,000 newborns.
    • Measles would infect about 4 million children, killing about 500.
    • Diphtheria would be one of the most common causes of death in school-aged children.
    • A bacterium called Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) would cause meningitis in 15,000 children, leaving many with permanent brain damage.
    • Pertussis (whooping cough) would kill thousands of infants.

    Vaccines have reduced and, in some cases, eliminated many diseases that killed or severely disabled people just a few generations before. For most Americans today, vaccines are a routine part of healthcare.
    However, the disappearance of many childhood diseases has led some parents to question whether vaccines are still necessary. Further, a growing number of parents are concerned that vaccines may actually be the cause of diseases such as autism, hyperactivity, developmental delay, attention deficit disorder, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) among others. These concerns have caused some parents to delay vaccines or withhold them altogether from their children.

    For more specific information on these concerns, visit the Vaccine Safety - Hot Topics and Vaccine Safety FAQs sections of our site.

    The Center is funded by endowments from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The Center does not receive any support from vaccine manufacturers.

    The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the nation's first children's hospital, has been a center of vaccine research and education for more than 125 years. For example, the rotavirus vaccine, a vaccine that prevents the most common cause of vomiting and diarrhea in children, was developed at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology.

    Do the benefits of the influenza vaccine outweigh the risks?
    The influenza vaccine can cause mild side effects. On the other hand, influenza hospitalizes and kills more people in this country than any other vaccine-preventable disease — about 200,000 hospitalizations and thousands to tens of thousands of deaths occur every year. Therefore, the benefits of the influenza vaccine clearly outweigh its risks.

    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Sep 26, '12
    MBARNBSN and JustBeachyNurse like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from NRSKarenRN
    Biggest reason to get vaccinations including flu shot: Prevention death.

    I guess growing up in 50's and 60's when we had childhood friends one day then 2 weeks later gone from measles, flu, whooping cough and having brother barely surviving 4 month interval battling several childhood diseases make me beat it to the PCP office for vaccinations.
    Or it could be the 100 + employees I'll be giving flu shots to in October.


    From Children's Hospital of Philadelphia:

    I'll 2nd. that emotion
    .... Aloha~
    JustBeachyNurse likes this.
  6. 4
    The bottom line is that if you want to attend certain schools or work at certain facilities and they require the flu shot then you have to do it.

    If you don't want to do it then do not go there.

    All the millions of pages of philisophical (?sp) argument and righteous indignation do not change that.

    There are plenty of things that employers can dictate and then you decide and vote with your feet.

    I find it ludicrous to have all this yada yada on the subject.
    mmm333, JustBeachyNurse, FlyingScot, and 1 other like this.
  7. 0
    First of all, I never said I was opposed to all vaccinations. I think the flu shot is a different category than other vaccines.

    Those of you who say things like people who don't get the flu shot are guilty of exposing people to the risk of death and should get out of the medical profession probably go to work with that last little bit of cold or respiratory infection. My point is that what you are saying others should do or they are guilty of endangering lives probably do the same thing yourself and kind of brush over it.

    In my mind, we should all be able to make reasonable choices for ourselves and not have it mandated. So, if you have the belief that you should get the flu shot, by all means get it. But it is my belief and opinion that it should not be mandated. All I want is the freedom of my beliefs.
  8. 0
    The bottom line is that if you want to attend certain schools or work at certain facilities and they require the flu shot then you have to do it.

    If you don't want to do it then do not go there.

    All the millions of pages of philisophical (?sp) argument and righteous indignation do not change that.

    There are plenty of things that employers can dictate and then you decide and vote with your feet.

    I find it ludicrous to have all this yada yada on the subject.
    Well, I might agree with you except that when I signed up there was not this requirement. They changed the rules after I quit my job and started school.
  9. 1
    I agree that having them change the game rules in the middle sucks. However, you just have to decide and deal with it. And I say that whether you are for or against it. It is just the kind of aggravation life dishes out unfortunately.

    As you can tell I have grown old to the point of no longer tilting at windmills - LOL!
    Aurora77 likes this.
  10. 0
    Yes, life does dish these things out. So, when you do not tilt at windmills, does that mean you just go with the flow? Or does that mean you make your own rules by charting your own course and looking for areas to work where you can stay true to yourself?

    Basically, you can tilt at a windmill two ways, by being blown over anytime a rule is made not in your favor or by being blown the other direction and doing what you are told without question. An oak usually stands strong within themselves and simply does not blow over in either direction. I do weary of these types of battles. I am not young. I try to avoid them by seeing them coming down the pike and choosing before they arrive. However, sometimes that can't be avoided and decisions have to be made. I am in the decision making process at the moment. I don't know what I am going to do right now but I am waiting to see what my options are. Time will tell.


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