Struggling to complete online RN-BSN

  1. 1
    My main struggle is the massive writing. I just can't seem to grasp the whole research thing. So far I have a 4.0 but I feel like that is going to change because the classes are getting more and more writing intense. The only reason I chose not to do on campus was because I need to work FT and need the flexibility.
    Just the thought of wring another paper makes me want to vomit. I HATE, HATE, HATE, writing.
    I'm trying so hard to keep my eyes on the prize.I have 16 more months until I'm done and I just want to cry.
    Vent over, off to writing more papers I go........
    noyesno likes this.
  2. Get the Hottest Nursing Topics Straight to Your Inbox!

  3. 17 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Having just finished my RN-MSN I can empathize with you. There is a lot of writing involved in the online bridge programs. What part of the research in particular are you having issues with?
    prnqday likes this.
  5. 2
    The BSN part typically covers more theory and management stuff, less clinicals. I did the BSN online and thought it was harder than the ASN because of the writing. You'll be ok...just make sure you reach out and get the help you need if you're lacking the research skills dept. Good luck to you.
    GrnTea and prnqday like this.
  6. 7
    Here's my suggestion: pick ONE topic on which to write all your papers. That way you aren't researching something new every time you have an assignment. For example, I chose health care access of the GLBT community. All my ethics, teaching, community health, legal, etc papers had this as a topic. You must be super organized in the beginning with your research materials, but believe me, when my final assignment (20+ page paper on a vulnerable community-yay!), I had all the preliminary research out of the way from previous papers, and was able not only to really focus my time on researching some in depth details, I also actually had time to create a system of interviews with community members and providers. My final paper was definitely publishable, and all because I didn't have to recreate the wheel.

    Many of my coworkers have done this. One in a CNM program focussed on circumcision. Whenever possible, she wrote her papers with circumcision as the topic. Other coworkers have chosen heart failure, core measures, pain, and DM type 1.

    It really does make the paper writing easier. You can't recycle your papers, but you can recycle your research. It saves a huge amount of time, and you don't have the research aspect to overwhelm you. It makes it much easier to get started when you don't have to face that, too.
    jadelpn, RNsRWe, kerrynurse, and 4 others like this.
  7. 2
    Quote from BluegrassRN
    Here's my suggestion: pick ONE topic on which to write all your papers. That way you aren't researching something new every time you have an assignment. For example, I chose health care access of the GLBT community. All my ethics, teaching, community health, legal, etc papers had this as a topic. You must be super organized in the beginning with your research materials, but believe me, when my final assignment (20+ page paper on a vulnerable community-yay!), I had all the preliminary research out of the way from previous papers, and was able not only to really focus my time on researching some in depth details, I also actually had time to create a system of interviews with community members and providers. My final paper was definitely publishable, and all because I didn't have to recreate the wheel.

    Many of my coworkers have done this. One in a CNM program focussed on circumcision. Whenever possible, she wrote her papers with circumcision as the topic. Other coworkers have chosen heart failure, core measures, pain, and DM type 1.

    It really does make the paper writing easier. You can't recycle your papers, but you can recycle your research. It saves a huge amount of time, and you don't have the research aspect to overwhelm you. It makes it much easier to get started when you don't have to face that, too.
    Yeah this is a great idea. I wrote most of my papers either on medical technology or stress factors in nursing.
    RNsRWe and prnqday like this.
  8. 3
    I wish I could stick to 1 topic. At this point in my rn-bsn, we get assigned the topic. I just write an op-ed piece, then backfill with appropriate citations to support my writing.

    To abide by the TOS (hi Siri!), I'll do this carefully... My approach to writing papers is, if you can't dazzle them with brilliance, then baffle them,,,, So far so good, have a 4.0 through 3 classes. 5 to go.
    twinmommy+2, WeepingAngel, and prnqday like this.
  9. 0
    I agree with BluegrassRN - one topic is helpful. But if not possible, at least choose one theorist so you do not have to rethink the meaning of every concept. I used to take the blueprint (or whatever you call the grading scale) and embed it in my file. Then I would "fill in the blanks". For instance, if the blueprint stated I would need to define concepts I had a heading called "Concepts Defined". That way I did not miss anything for which I was being graded and it gave more flow to the document. At one point I had a graduate student in journalism help me till I got the hang of it.
  10. 2
    Yeah I would use the rubric as well and "fill in the blanks" I would even use the required information as section headers so it was very clear where the data was.
    klone and prnqday like this.
  11. 1
    RUBRIC. Thanks, I was stuggling-------------
    prnqday likes this.
  12. 0
    Thank you. I'm having trouble with completing Literature Reviews at this time.


Top