buying a pulse ox of my own? - page 4

I am completing my school preceptorship on the same floor where I currently work as an aide and will be working as a nurse. We are a telemetry step-down unit. The floor has the same problem as... Read More

  1. by   TiffyRN
    Quote from casbeezgirlrn
    great priorities but what about the days/times you are not working? who's responsibility is it to make sure that pt. in distress has a pulse ox.?

    that's what i was thinking! does the patient deserve lesser care if his nurse is not financially able to provide his/her own equipment? it's one thing to have your special pen or a nifty pair of scissors; a patient's life should not be up to luck of the draw of having a nurse who has the means to have their own special equipment (which the unit should be providing anyway).
  2. by   LanaBanana
    Wow, I had no idea that this would be so controversial. Every nurse on my floor has said they wish they could buy their own pulse ox. I do want to clarify something - my floor does have a pulse ox machine, it is just often MIA in a patient's room or in the drawer of someone elses med cart or someone else is using it for assessments. The floors I was on that haven't had one were ones I did clinicals on. The reason I would buy one is so that I could spend more time doing patient care and less time traching things down.
  3. by   chenoaspirit
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Don't assume that a nurse who believes she should not be responsible for buying a pulse ox, does not make pt care her priority. This is the self-sacrificial attitude that is holding our profession back and allowing these facilities to continue this practice.

    If you walked into a pt's room and it was 'obvious that a pt was in respiratory failure' (your words, not mine) and you had to have a pulse ox reading before you reacted...pt care is not your priority and you are relying too heavily on fallable equipment anyway....but that's an entirely different thread.

    No one is disputing that nurses who DO want to buy a pulse ox are doing them for noble reasons. However, their view of the situation is very short sighted. They want an immediate solution, and are less concerned with the long term problems that it may cause, not only at their facility but possibly others. They are not addressing the bigger problem at hand, nurses being taken advantage of by the larger corporations who are essentially responsible for providing this equipment. IMO, that is definitely a battle worth fighting.

    I refuse to argue. Im not on this site to do that. THAT is what is holding nurses back, the inability to be a team and work together or agree to disagree. My point was that it came in handy to have it with me. I CHOOSE to have one because it helps me to provide better patient care. No I do NOT rely too heavily on whatever you said. Honestly I just dont care what you said. The OP just asked a question and it has turned into a bashing.
  4. by   Lovely_RN
    Why does it have to be called bashing just because other people have expressed a different perspective from the OP in regard to buying their own pulse ox? I thought the purpose of having a forum was to discuss issues related to nursing?

    At the end of the day opinions are nothing more than food for thought.
  5. by   cardiacRN2006
    Hmmm. I've been following this thread and I didn't see it as a bashing.


    Actually, there have been some very, very valid points brought up. Liabililty being one: lack of calibration and documentation and treatment based on that equipment. Also, the other staff not having access to the pulse ox, because instead of going through proper channels to get the necessary equipment, some staff are bringing in their own.


    In the end, it's the pts who fail or at risk for nurses bringing in their own mechanical equipment.
  6. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from chenoaspirit
    I refuse to argue. Im not on this site to do that. THAT is what is holding nurses back, the inability to be a team and work together or agree to disagree. My point was that it came in handy to have it with me. I CHOOSE to have one because it helps me to provide better patient care. No I do NOT rely too heavily on whatever you said. Honestly I just dont care what you said. The OP just asked a question and it has turned into a bashing.
    I am not bashing you or arguing with you for the simple sake of arguing. I am simply debating the issue, which I have the right to do. Sorry you took it personally.
  7. by   RNsRWe
    To LanaBanana, the OP, I understood your original question and have put my two cents in....my floor DOES have this equipment "available", like yours, and I have made the same considerations as you regarding MY OWN CONVENIENCE and time-saving. Yes, it is the hospital's responsibility to have the equipment available but they are obviously not required to have so many available as to make it the most convenient for their staff. So some will choose to get one and MAKE it convenient, and I refuse to argue about whether I should or should not "fight" for more of them. It's a ridiculous arguement because we're not talking about the difference between NO pulse oxes and HAVING pulse oxes. We're talking about the convenience of the staff in having one available immediately, rather than spending time searching for equipment to make our jobs easier.

    If people want to fight their hospitals to get three pulse oxes per floor instead of two, or five instead of three, more power to them. That's their decision.

    I have no interest in thumping a drum over this, and I don't care for the negative references toward those of us who feel this way (short-sightedness? self-sacrificial attitude? not making pt care a priority?).

    I am not liking the tone of this thread any longer as it does not feel that the OP's question is being debated, but rather the characters of those nurses who do not wish to take up some sort of battle cry. Time for me to bow out.
  8. by   chenoaspirit
    Quote from RNsRWe
    To LanaBanana, the OP, I understood your original question and have put my two cents in....my floor DOES have this equipment "available", like yours, and I have made the same considerations as you regarding MY OWN CONVENIENCE and time-saving. Yes, it is the hospital's responsibility to have the equipment available but they are obviously not required to have so many available as to make it the most convenient for their staff. So some will choose to get one and MAKE it convenient, and I refuse to argue about whether I should or should not "fight" for more of them. It's a ridiculous arguement because we're not talking about the difference between NO pulse oxes and HAVING pulse oxes. We're talking about the convenience of the staff in having one available immediately, rather than spending time searching for equipment to make our jobs easier.

    If people want to fight their hospitals to get three pulse oxes per floor instead of two, or five instead of three, more power to them. That's their decision.

    I have no interest in thumping a drum over this, and I don't care for the negative references toward those of us who feel this way (short-sightedness? self-sacrificial attitude? not making pt care a priority?).

    I am not liking the tone of this thread any longer as it does not feel that the OP's question is being debated, but rather the characters of those nurses who do not wish to take up some sort of battle cry. Time for me to bow out.

    Well said. I agree with you totally.
  9. by   tridil2000
    Quote from casbeezgirlrn
    great priorities but what about the days/times you are not working? who's responsibility is it to make sure that pt. in distress has a pulse ox. available? it is the hospital. fighting the battle now will help assure there is is equipment there all the time for all staff to use. the nm needs to be accountable and do her job. she is getting off easy and people are letting her. i wouldn't. that would be my choice. i have never yet in 10 years had a detrimental pt. outcome due to lack of equipment. the hospital/facility has to provide.

    hear hear!

    i see budgets.

    i would never buy anything for my hospital. not even a pen.

    your nm is responsible. i would walk into her office everytime saying "there's no pulse ox today... again. any ideas?" plus incident reports!!! let qa in on this little problem!
  10. by   tridil2000
    problem:
    not enough equipment.

    dr solution: rants and raves.... makes a scene. demands equipment. gets equipment.
    problem solved.

    nurse solution: goes to ebay to buy equipment out of pocket.
    problem remains.

    'CMON nurses!!!!!! why do you do this to yourselves??????
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from cardiacrn2006
    hmmm. i've been following this thread and i didn't see it as a bashing.


    actually, there have been some very, very valid points brought up. liabililty being one: lack of calibration and documentation and treatment based on that equipment. also, the other staff not having access to the pulse ox, because instead of going through proper channels to get the necessary equipment, some staff are bringing in their own.
    :yeahthat:


    placing my manager and safety committee hat on:

    liability issues are enourmous here!

    jcaho requires yearly calibration of low risk medical equpiment like pulse oximetry. all hospitals have p+p that only bioengineering tested battery operated and electrical equipment be utilized in patient care

    if a patient is harmed as result rn's personal pulse ox equipment used resulting in inaccurate reading/treament, a facility will turn around and sue you, fire you and report to sbon for failure to follow procedure leading to patient harm-----license most likely sanctioned with possible revocation.
    make sure you carry personal malpractice insurance as you need lawyer to aid in your defense. even your manager can be sued for failing to properly supervise you!
    five minutes spent tracking down equipment versus hours in court ----please weigh these factors.

    for those facilities lacking in essential equipment, that 5 minutes taken to fill out occurnace form notifying managemnt that needed equipment broken/ missing , insufficent quatity will be your defense too (alsways keep personal copy). put the onus back onto management/facility for having adequate equipment.

    canadian nurses protective society infolaw bulletins aboriginal ...the court found that the nurse's employer, the hospital, was liable for the nurse's negligence because the hospital had control over the equipment used and ...
    www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3911/is_199905/ai_n8827721


    patient safety and production pressure: icu nursing perspective

    levels of liability: its not just the physician anymore


    hhn: the top ten malpractice claims [and how to minimize them]

    indmedica - journal of the academy of hospital administration

    american college of surgeons professional liability program
  12. by   sirI
    The employee, as well as the facility, have a duty to to provide a safe environment. Including, for example:

    1. Proper employee orientation to equipment used for patient care
    2. Facility provisions for said orientation with documentation of attendance
    3. Ability to recognize failure of equipment
    4. Provisions for safety maintenance
    5. Properly overseeing that maintenance is carried out and documented

    Federal and state guidelines as apply to health facilities require maintenance contracts for calibration of medical equipement. In fact, anything utilized for the patient. This includes the pulse ox, wheel chairs, blood pressure cuffs, etc.

    Anyone wishing to utilize their own equipment must have this okayed by their facility. There needs to be in black and white, a policy regarding privately owned equipment for patient care that addresses the guidelines outlined by OSHA, JACHO, EPA, just to name a few.

    Since I am in the rural clinic setting, I oversee all contracts for said maintenance thus satisfying rules/regs/P/P from the federal/state.

    Here is a link regarding safety maintenance:

    http://www.systoc.com/Tracker/Spring00/clinic.htm

    Here is a link for rural health clinics:

    1. All Clinic equipment will be inspected at least yearly, or as the type, use, and condition of equipment dictates. Each time an inspection or repair occurs, an entry will be made in the Inspection and Maintenance Log and signed by the service person to verify the event.
    2. The medical/clinical assistant prior to each use must inspect all equipment.
    3. An electrician or bio-medical engineer will inspect each piece of bio-medical equipment. The inspection will ensure that the equipment is in proper operating condition, is safe to use, and is calibrated properly.
    http://www.ruralhealth.hrsa.gov/rhc/...manualFive.htm


    An excerpt from a p/p I wrote:

    If medical/patient equipment is involved in patient injury/death:

    1. Immediately notify the Medical Director/administrator/legal department
    2. Complete incident/variance report
    3. Document the model number, serial number, control number, and manufacturer of the equipment on the incident report
    4. Notify Medical Engineering that you have a piece of equipment that has been involved in an alleged incident and requires evaluation.
    5. Provide documentation of maintenance contract
    6. Provide documentation of equipment QA
    When viewed from a legal stand point of view, remember:

    "Failure to maintain a safe environment".....
  13. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from siri
    "Failure to maintain a safe environment".....
    Ugh. That statement give me chills up the spine. Let's hope none of us have to hear that.

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