Resume Critique Please

  1. 0
    Morning! I'm a new nurse going on seven months experience and expecting to move out of state by April at earlier, this summer at latest. I've already started applying for job about a month ago and the general consensus is that I need more experience to apply for a regular position. New Grad positions will be posted/start after I get my full year in though. :/

    I thought I might go ahead and see if anyone was willing to critique this. I know it doesn't change much, but knowing it looks as best it can would do wonders for my confidence. Please critique if you have the time.

    CS = city and state and should be all the way to the right of where it actually appears here. Real resume is a word document and doesn't copy/paste very well apparently. :/

    [name]
    [address]
    [cell]
    [home]
    [email]
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    PROFESSIONAL OBJECTIVE
    To become a member of your health care team as a Registered Nurse after relocating to the [city] area, preferably on the Cardiovascular Step-Down or Medical Surgical units where I can use my experience, training, and education to provide high-quality patient care.

    EDUCATION
    [Hospital name] [city, state]
    o Introduction to Critical Care Nursing
    o Acute Dysrhythmia Recognition & Therapeutic Modalities
    · [University name] [City, s]
    o August 2009 – May 10, 2013
    o A.D.N. Nursing
    o Presidential Honors Scholarship
    o Outstanding Student Award
    o Honor’s List, December 2011
    o Dean’s List, December 2009 – May 2011
    · Advanced Cardiac Life Support
    o August 2013 – Renewal Date August 2015
    · Basic Life Support
    o August 2009 – Expires October 2015
    · Insert High School [c,s]
    o August 2007 – May 2009
    · Insert High School [c/s]
    o August 1996 – May 2007

    EXPERIENCE
    June 2013 – Present
    [Hospital name] [c,s]
    Registered Nurse, Cardiovascular Step-Down Unit
    1184 hours as of 2/1/14
    · Assessed and cared for a wide range of patients recovering from cardiovascular events such as unstable and new onset angina, coronary artery bypass graft, fem-pop bypass, carotid stents, carotid endarterectomy, cerebrovascular accident, heart valve repair, aortic aneurysm repair, and cardiac catheterization.
    · Assessed and cared for patients experiencing a range of medical-surgical diagnoses including spontaneous pneumothorax, congestive heart failure exacerbation, influenza, pneumonia, acute renal insufficiency, end-stage renal disease, diabetes mellitus, lower extremity amputation, cellulitis, dementia, and pressure ulcers in addition to post-operative thoracotomy patients.
    · Administered medications in a safe and timely manner; prepared patients preoperatively; and performed clinical procedures utilizing non-invasive monitoring equipment (EKG/telemetry).
    · Provided shift chest tube maintenance, peg tube maintenance, blood administration, wound care, and dressing changes to patients.
    · Worked collaboratively with surgeons, cardiologists, and hospitalists to discuss patients’ changing conditions and medical needs.
    · Facilitated the recovery process through patient and family education with a focus on pre/post-operative procedures, prevention, medication, and pain management techniques.
    · Consistently provided accurate and detailed documentation throughout shifts.
    · Assisted LPN staff members in administering intravenous medications, reviewing care plans, and performing admission assessments for newly admitted patients.
    · Charge nurse for two shifts during emergency staffing.

    August 2011 – May 2013
    University Nursing Clinical [cs]
    Nursing Student
    · Rotations at a variety of clinical sites including: Byrd Regional Hospital, Beauregard Memorial Hospital, Central Louisiana State Hospital, and Westwood Manor Nursing Home.
    · Clinical experience that has honed my critical thinking, physical assessment, medication administration, charting, and patient interview skills.

    August 2010 – August 2011
    Donovan’s Laundry [cs]
    Cashier
    · Operated the cash-register, including verifying that the correct amount of currency was present at the end of shift.
    · Received and retrieved customer orders in a timely fashion.

    September 2009 – November 2009
    J & J Maintenance [cs]
    Contract Employee
    · Assisted in preparing Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital for inspection.
    · Organized, cleaned, and assisted in minor repairs to building.

    June 2009 – August 2009
    [insert] High School [cs]
    Summer Employee
    · Assisted in preparing classrooms and supplies for the following semester.

    PROFESSIONAL / STUDENT ORGANIZATION / COMMUNITY SERVICE
    · [Name] State University Nursing Goes Blue for CASA in [c.s]
    · Beauregard Agape Community Clinic in [c.state]

    REFERENCES
    Available upon request.
  2. 871 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Totally erase the clinical in school and all the jobs before your nursing job, also your high school education is properly dropped off after you graduate from college. (Note also, not that you said it, but I see it a lot: the college graduates students; the student graduates from college.)

    Nobody wants to see that you worked a cash register (note, not hyphenated) at a laundry or in maintenance; these have nothing to do c nursing.

    If you think you learned something really important that directly benefits your nursing career in those jobs, like you were so great that they made you a team leader in maintenance and you managed a team of four including doing evals and budget, you can mention them in your interview.
    LadyFree28 likes this.
  5. 0
    I personally would place experience before education. Agree with leaving off clinicals and jobs prior to nursing. May help to include anticipated relocation date in objective so they know you are serious about relocating.
  6. 0
    It's a bit hard to critique a resume in a forum. I generally recommend (especially if you are just out of college) listing things on your resume in the following order: Education, Certifications (these should be listed separately from your formal educational experience), Informal Trainings (i.e. if you attended a conference, have CEUs, etc), Experience (I would recommend having a full resume of all your job experience and then creating a separate resume that is job specific), Clinical experience (this should be separate from your job experience), Service/Volunteer Experience, Skills section (general things that would otherwise be under multiple sections or are not specific to any one experience), Awards, Extra Curricular Activities.

    It seems like the practice of writing a professional objective statement is falling out of fashion and doesn't really seem to play a big role in your resume other than taking up space. You are applying for a specific job, they're going to assume that it is what you are looking for. You can also leave off your references. If you get an interview, have them available on a separate sheet that you can leave with them if they ask. A lot of times you'll have to fill out an online application or a supplemental application that will ask for references. Again it just takes up valuable space.

    Formatting is a big issue, make your resume your own. (I know you said it's hard to copy and paste from a word doc.) I use a word table to make sure all of my formatting is correct. If this isn’t something you are sure of how to do Google is a great resource for learning how to use Word.

    Your resume is really just marketing – why is one product better than another, why are you as a candidate more qualified. As far as content for your resume goes, a big thing you want to keep in mind is that your resume is pretty much all you have to market yourself to an employer. This is all you have to let them know that you are the right candidate for your job. Use statistics as much as you can – numbers are concrete while words provide a vague image. Everything you have done can be played to your advantage, you just have to word things in a way that is still truthful, but shows what you did in the best way possible. Long lists of skills you’ve performed or diagnosis’ you’ve cared for really don’t showcase you as the person to hire.

    Sorry for the novel, I just spend a lot of time updating my resume as well. It’s something you’ve got to invest time in. Keep it up to date, polished, and shiny.
  7. 0
    Quote from kaufer01
    It's a bit hard to critique a resume in a forum. I generally recommend (especially if you are just out of college) listing things on your resume in the following order: Education, Certifications (these should be listed separately from your formal educational experience), Informal Trainings (i.e. if you attended a conference, have CEUs, etc), Experience (I would recommend having a full resume of all your job experience and then creating a separate resume that is job specific), Clinical experience (this should be separate from your job experience), Service/Volunteer Experience, Skills section (general things that would otherwise be under multiple sections or are not specific to any one experience), Awards, Extra Curricular Activities.
    I disagree with your format in the OP's case; most employers don't have time to sift through the education; the OP has a recent nursing job; they need to see if the experience is there and will zero in on the job, then where you graduated from/IF you graduated, etc.

    Another biggie is using a bulleted point of skills or listing of your license number; THAT's important; you can sell your strongest skills and experience; make sure that there is a license listed to confirm you actually HAVE a license and available to work.

    Long lists of skills you’ve performed or diagnosis’ you’ve cared for really don’t showcase you as the person to hire.
    I've heard otherwise from recruiters and personal experience that at least having a list of important nursing skills and familiarity with some nursing skills IS important; ie ACLS, PALS, transplant pts, vented pts, etc; keep it brief though; and CEUS are a good thing to list as well; being a part of a particular nursing organization beyond the ANA at least shows that your are interested in being in that particular specialty and obtain CEUs from that org does show that you are willing to stay in the specialty.

    I would also add that having a particular format does help and finding a nursing format can generate more of a notice that the usual Word document; having spoke to a recruiter and tweaked my résumé to what recruiters are looking for, I have een able to land interviews and get the job.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Feb 19


Top