Is my stated interest ruining my chances?? - page 2

by jamie.glaze 4,281 Views | 28 Comments

I am a new grad RN (ADN) who is already beginning RN-to-BSN education. I have thus far been unable to secure a RN/GN residency/internship. My SO and I have had the conversation lately that I should remove my statement of... Read More


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    Quote from jamie.glaze
    I am a new grad RN (ADN) who is already beginning RN-to-BSN education. I have thus far been unable to secure a RN/GN residency/internship.

    My SO and I have had the conversation lately that I should remove my statement of interest in Certified Nurse Midwifery from my resume. He thinks it is limiting and/or playing on the personal opinions of nurse managers who may not be accepting of the CNM practice model - and that it may be the reason I am not getting call-backs. At all. I think it is me being up front and showing that I have "a five-year plan" I feel like it shows that I have a strong interest in evidence-based practice and a driven focus. Any wisdom?
    [/TABLE]
    I will have to agree with your SO. It's great that you want to be honest, but a manager just sees that you'll leave bedside nursing as soon as you get your CNM, which could be as soon as 3 years from hiring you.

    Market yourself as the best L&D ever! Don't tell them you just need the job to gain experience and move on. Because that's what you're really saying.
    caliotter3 likes this.
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    Quote from Learnlesson
    Sorry, but there's no way on tis earth I would hire a nurse without clinical experience. You may want to expand the area you are job searching in. Being a new grad only teaches you enough to NOT kill someone (per our nursing instructor at graduation). You MUST have 1-2 years on the floor in order to be a well rounded nurse and to put theory into practice without an instructor to run to. Look outside your city and take whatever RN job you can get. The experience will at least get you a foot in the door at the hospital you really want to work at.
    To the OP: this is not true at all. Many facilities are willing to take on a new grad and train them properly. Especially in L&D where the skills are completely different from any other type of nursing. Don't be discouraged! Everyone I know who wanted mother/baby or L&D after graduating got those jobs straight out of school.
    jamie.glaze likes this.
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    Now if only I could get one of those residencies =) I missed out on all of the June cycle residencies for L&D - there won't be anymore until January.In the meantime, I need to feed my kids so it looks like off to any RN job I can get. For the time being and lots of lying about how I want to work med-surg
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    Remove your areas of interests, that's what the cover letter is for.
    caliotter3 and jamie.glaze like this.
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    A few things about your resume:

    1. Remove the Objective section. I can't stand the objective in resumes. Everyone reading your resume knows that you're applying because you want a job. Instead, use that section to write a nice paragraph which details your skills and qualifications- make it clear that you're a great candidate. A winning resume has to be specific to you and stand out from the crowd. A generic objective gets your resume off to a lackluster start.

    2. Being a student nurse should go under your education, not your experience. You are not employed as a student nurse and it does not count as work experience. You want to highlight your mother/baby and L&D experience if those are the jobs you're applying for.

    3. You should get NRP certified and take a fetal monitoring course. These are required for almost every L&D job and as a new grad they will give you a better chance of being noticed.

    4. I don't think the interest section is needed at all. It's not common to include it on resumes, and it really doesn't add too much to the quality of your resume. If you're concerned about listing midwifery, then you can leave the mother/baby, peds, and women's health interests and midwifery is still included in those. But I'd rather see you express an interest in these things in your intro paragraph, rather than in a separate section. Of course, you should only include these if you are applying to positions in these fields.

    5. Is there a career counselor or a college professor that could help you with your resume? Having someone experienced go over your resume and suggest changes in wording, format, etc. can be really helpful when you're trying to create a resume that will get you noticed.
    caliotter3 and jamie.glaze like this.
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    I would revamp the resume with a shorter objective, than list your nursing education and diploma, date of graduation, GPA if good. Then I would list certifications including that you passed boards. Then work experience. I think you should shorten that up as it's not directly relevant to RN job, though I understand you are showing transferable skills.

    In a short cover letter you can describe your nursing clinical experience and how it relates to the job at hand. I wouldn't mention "interests" unless you are applying for that particular job ie mom/baby, pediatrics then highlight how your clinical sparked your interest in working in that field of nursing. Don't mention your future plans because they want to hire you as an RN not as a nurse/midwife. After you are working somewhere and things are going well and after you get your BSN and starting your masters program then would be the time to put out feelers of your ultimate goal. Stay on good terms with everyone as networking is important.

    Take the time to research the hospital you are applying to and the manager of that unit you are applying to. Google the hospital, mananger and check out linked in. Consider personally contacting the hiring manager, call the hospital and ask for person, great if you too have someone in common, check linked in network.
    jamie.glaze likes this.
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    There's a different between an RN-CNM who works in a hospital and a non-RN midwife who works in a birthing center who is really into the spirituality of mothers and babies. Maybe just clarify how much of a hippie you are --at least in that particularly judgemental manager's eyes
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    Quote from tigerlogic
    There's a different between an RN-CNM who works in a hospital and a non-RN midwife who works in a birthing center who is really into the spirituality of mothers and babies. Maybe just clarify how much of a hippie you are --at least in that particularly judgemental manager's eyes
    The difference just has to do with state regulations as some states recognize non RN CNMs and others don't, but that doesn't mean that RN CNMs only work in hospitals and non RN CNMs don't and vice versa.
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    LearnLesson never told new grads to pack it in and that they're worthless. You asked for advice/thoughts regarding your resume and you got hers. You've taken constructive comments and turned it into a "nurses eat their young" cliche!!
    gonzo1 likes this.
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    ColleenRN2B - there is nothing constructive about telling someone you don't know personally that they don't know anything and that you would never hire a new grad without experience (that last one is an opinion, not ConCrit). Just what exact experience should a new grad have other than their education? I think it should speak volumes that I did as well as I did, have as many recommendations as I have, and was the ONLY student in my class willing to take on all of my preceptor's patients in a day by the end of senior semester - managing their care with only the preceptor accompanying me to watch me work and to bounce questions off of (thank you Brandy for letting me spread my wings) - all without a stitch of medical experience other than my education and skills based training.

    I asked for advice on my resume, not for someone's opinion on the perils of hiring new grads.


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