Bad resumes/good resumes *rant* - page 6

by mclennan 11,895 Views | 56 Comments

I'm assisting with hiring a new case manager RN and would like to vent about the HORRIBLE quality resumes I am seeing in the mile high stack we're reading through. #1 problem: basic spelling, grammar, punctuation and command... Read More


  1. 2
    I am always willing to help, I have been there. I didn't become good at resume writing overnight. I had to research it thoroughly to find out what current employers are looking for. So instead of PMing each of you, I will show you what I have found out. Just make sure you hit these points within your Resume. Secondly, don't forget the "homerun" a Cover Letter can bring, and its importance. It is your one chance to flat-out ask for an interview to sell your skills and knowledge at the INTERVIEW. If you are making interviews you are doing something right. I am going to type it up on a thread right now so I don't derail this one. I will name the thread "Getting Your Desired Position 101."
    strawberryluv and friendlyjane like this.
  2. 0
    Unfortunately....I am not even getting calls for an interview. My references are fine. So there must be something I am doing wrong with my resume/cover letter. I am becoming increasingly disheartened at the economy and the way new grads are facing brick walls when applying for jobs.
  3. 1
    I will look got your thread Boston! I could certainly use the help! Thanks.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  4. 0
    Perfect grammar doesn't guarantee a good nurse, but it will help with finding that job and charting in a readable manner. I've seen some notes charted by nurses that, due to spelling and grammatical errors, would not hold up in court.
    Wow! I am kind or nervous to post on this topic because I may mess up on my grammar or spelling. This is just a forum and not a college paper, right? Ha ha! Just kidding, but I am paying extra attention to my commas and spelling in this post.

    I understand why grammar and spelling are important for a job resume, but is it true that if you don't put a comma where it should be when charting it would not stand up in court? That would be too picky, wouldn't it? That kind of freaks me out a bit. What is the criteria for grammar and spelling errors in charting? I would think it would be more then just simple mistakes, correct? Oh, and I love the OP. It is such a great reference to have. I am putting it in my favorites file for the future when I am done with school.

    Sorry if my grammar suckes in this post. I am not good at grammar at all, but when writing college papers and anything that needs to be professiona, l I do try very hard to have the best grammar and spelling possible. It does not come naturally to me at all. I think I added to many commas in this post for instance. LOL! Oh well!
  5. 2
    Quote from friendlyjane
    Wow! I am kind or nervous to post on this topic because I may mess up on my grammar or spelling. This is just a forum and not a college paper, right? Ha ha! Just kidding, but I am paying extra attention to my commas and spelling in this post.

    I understand why grammar and spelling are important for a job resume, but is it true that if you don't put a comma where it should be when charting it would not stand up in court? That would be too picky, wouldn't it? That kind of freaks me out a bit. What is the criteria for grammar and spelling errors in charting? I would think it would be more then just simple mistakes, correct? Oh, and I love the OP. It is such a great reference to have. I am putting it in my favorites file for the future when I am done with school.

    Sorry if my grammar suckes in this post. I am not good at grammar at all, but when writing college papers and anything that needs to be professiona, l I do try very hard to have the best grammar and spelling possible. It does not come naturally to me at all. I think I added to many commas in this post for instance. LOL! Oh well!
    Here's a non-nursing example. Think about how differences in punctuation give the two different sentences completely different meanings. The same thing can happen with nursing documentation.

    An English professor wrote the words, “Woman without her man is nothing” on the blackboard and directed his students to punctuate it correctly.
    The men wrote:
    “Woman, without her man, is nothing.”

    The women wrote: “Woman: Without her, man is nothing.”
    elkpark and friendlyjane like this.
  6. 0
    Here's a non-nursing example. Think about how differences in punctuation give the two different sentences completely different meanings. The same thing can happen with nursing documentation.

    An English professor wrote the words, “Woman without her man is nothing” on the blackboard and directed his students to punctuate it correctly.
    The men wrote:
    “Woman, without her man, is nothing.”

    The women wrote: “Woman: Without her, man is nothing.”
    Great example. Very funny as well. Thank you for answering my question.
  7. 3
    when i did some hiring at a previous business job i did throw away every resume with a typo. i know it sounds harsh, because we are all human and we do make mistakes. however, a resume is supposed to be the best reflection of you and demonstrate how much you want this job. if you couldn't take the time to proof your resume and show me how much you want this job, i can't waste my time in following up with you.

    resumes need to highlight you at your best. period.
    strawberryluv, elkpark, and wooh like this.


Top