Mom suing nurse after suffocation accident - page 2

This Mother Is Suing a Hospital for Millions After She Accidentally Killed Her Son... Read More

  1. by   klone
    Quote from TriciaJ
    This is one of the biggest drivers of the cost of healthcare in the US.
    Is it? I don't think research actually bears this out.

    New study shows that the savings from 'tort reform' are mythical - LA Times
  2. by   RobbiRN
    What country are you from macawake? Are you accepting immigrants? The lawyers here plead before the jury how morally imperative it is for the wronged individual to be properly compensated for all his or her suffering before the law firm walks off with nearly half the loot. Lawyers routinely seek litigation, advertising that "there is no cost unless we recover for you."

    This suite states that the plaintiff did not discover that all the elements in her claim existed until a professional reviewed the record in 2017. There's a fair chance she responded to an add offering to go get her some money. In this case, if the lawyers get $4 million, they could probably lose 10 other cases like it and still pocket $2 million. Litigation is the main driver behind costly and often misdirected "defensive medicine."

    Klone wonders how this will affect OB practice. Me too. The usual course is more restrictions to clutter life, more waivers, and more policy and procedures to make sure the institution is protected as we struggle to make our world absolutely idiot proof. 24,000 new Federal regulations in the last 8 years? Aren't we there yet?
  3. by   NurseCard
    I don't have much to add, just.. what a horrible story.

    I also want to know, what is an OB nurse supposed to do with a
    mom post partum who is in enough pain to warrant strong
    medication, yet is exclusively breastfeeding and that baby is
    hungry???

    Perhaps a policy stating that someone should be in the room
    and awake to monitor mom 24/7? Or SOME way to monitor
    moms that are breastfeeding, so that this does not happen?
    Cameras? q15 minute checks?
  4. by   klone
    Quote from mkk99
    That's going to be a hospital-specific policy - I do not routinely order narcotics for vaginal deliveries.
    My comment was not meant to be universal - I was speaking for what we do at our facility.
  5. by   elkpark
    Quote from TriciaJ
    This is one of the biggest drivers of the cost of healthcare in the US ...
    Do you have sources to support this statement? The statistics I've seen in the past, over the years, have indicated that malpractice suits represent only a tiny proportion of the healthcare spending in the US, and that states that have initiated "tort reform" and set limits on individuals' ability to sue have not experienced significant reductions in healthcare costs.
  6. by   adventure_rn
    So sad, and so scary. During falls risk teaching in the NICU, I've had moms confess that with their earlier (non-NICU) babies that while on postpartum they had fallen asleep with baby in the bed or chair, dropped them on the floor, and never told anybody.

    Unfortunately, in NICU I find that many parents get pretty ticked off if you tell them not to fall asleep holding baby, since there is too much risk that they'll a) fall and hit their head, or b) roll into a crevice and suffocate. Some parents get really argumentative when you actually enforce this policy, with the mindset of "I'm the parent, don't tell me when I'm allowed or not allowed to to hold my baby," or "You think you know better than I do whether I'm capable of holding right now?" It really puts the nurse between a rock and a hard place, since we have to balance safety with satisfaction scores.
  7. by   Jedrnurse
    Are opioids passed through breast milk? If so, should a mom taking them be breast feeding?
  8. by   klone
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    Are opioids passed through breast milk? If so, should a mom taking them be breast feeding?
    Very small amounts and yes, it's perfectly safe.
  9. by   RobbiRN
    Quote from klone
    Is it? I don't think research actually bears this out.

    New study shows that the savings from 'tort reform' are mythical - LA Times
    I've seen several other articles like this one. While they claim a low percentage, I've seen the transformation in the practice of several doctors who have been sued. While defensive medicine is subjective and difficult to quantify, in my environment, the percentage seems much higher than 2-3%. Even if they are right, $78 billion is still a lot of money arguably wasted.
  10. by   klone
    Quote from RobbiRN
    I've seen the transformation in the practice of several doctors who have been sued.
    As have I, but you know what they say about making inferences about statistics based on anecdotal evidence.
  11. by   offlabel
    Quote from klone
    I am the manager of an OB department in Oregon. I'm wondering what effect this litigation will have on our practices. Are we going to require moms to get up out of bed and sit in a chair every time they need to feed their baby? Will a nurse have to sit in the room with the mom the entire time she's holding her baby unless another adult is there? What effect is this going to have on patient satisfaction? On breastfeeding, and mother-infant bonding?
    If past proceedings of legislators of the state of Oregon is any indication, they'll probably outlaw delivery in hospitals. Oh...but if you're 15 or under while delivering, you can smoke dope for analgesia...
  12. by   JKL33
    From the link:

    "Tort reform" would only eliminate orders made purely because of fear of litigation -- that is, 100% defensively -- and that's a tiny percentage of the total.
    This statement involves quite the spurious definition of "defensive medicine." "100% defensively" would mean something like seeking to rule out a condition that is not even in the differential, since if it IS in the differential then whatever is done to rule it out is not strictly "defensive." I've heard these arguments before and they make no sense, but they sound reasonable if not thought all the way through.
  13. by   OrganizedChaos
    The woman is claiming the nurse came in at night to give her, her baby to breastfeed. The woman is saying the nurse is at fault because she was medicated with Ambien & Vicodin & was unsupervised while breastfeeding her son. She then states she dozed off with her son in her bed & then when she woke up her son was in her bed, unresponsive. She called for a nurse but one didn't come. Apparently, the woman had to leave her room to get a nurse to attend to her son.

    So, what do all of you think of this? Is this a case of neglect? Does the nurse deserve to be sued?


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