No job...giving up

  1. 0
    Hi everyone. im a new grad RN since last yr oct2013. honestly im getting tired of being denied of not even giving an opportunity. sent out thousands of apps, called walked in etc. changed up my resume etc. not to sound negative but WHAT ELSE can i possibly do career wise with this licence? and please not to be rude but i dont want to read replys saying "give it time, just hold out longer, your job will come soon" thats not going to help. so yea thanks...
    or if anyone knows somewhere outside the US that would possibly consider me?
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    How does your resume look? Is there any chance that you'd be willing to apply as an nursing assistant or unit secretary just to get your foot in the door at a hospital? What type of nursing are you interested in? Are there any job fairs coming up soon in your area? And I learned that you have to kind of be a stalker to land a position lol. Call, email every week, it makes you REALLY stand out and seem interested. You worked hard for that license and on your schooling... Relocate if it's a feasible option for you... Nurse residency programs, fellowships, etc.
  4. 7
    Here is what I would suggest:

    Be as objective as you can and do a thorough self-assessment.

    The things to look out for are:

    1) Are you a good candidate for employment?

    Managers want to see a stable background on your resumé. They fully believe that history repeats itself, so if you have a meager or spotty employment history, they are going to screen you out. To address this, note any long periods of unemployment on your resume and give a good explanation for them. If you haven't had any jobs, highlight any extracurricular activities and emphasize your education.

    If you have been fired in the past, and don't have a good explanation or can't show a plan for improvement, you will be screened out. Managers are already iffy about people who have been let go, for whatever reason. If you just say it was a bad fit or your previous boss was a jerk, they will not be interested in you. If, however, you can say something like, "I used this as a learning experience, took a class at my community college, and developed better interpersonal skills as a result," then they are more likely to add your resumé to the "keep" pile.

    If you don't have certifications or activities that will make you stand out, they will screen you out. Many new grads don't realize just how many go-getter students there are that were active in student government, volunteered at the hospital they wanted to be employed by, and went ahead and got their ACLS and PALS cards. These new grads tend to get hired first. If you want to stand out, start doing these things now so you can add them to your resume. You won't be able to participate in student government, but you can certainly get your certifications and get some volunteer experience.

    2) Does your resume showcase what your future employers want to see? Even if your resumé is fantastic, with no holes in your employment, with excellent activities and certifications, most employers want to see evidence that you have researched their company. Include key words from mission and values statements in your cover letter and objective statement. Use current buzzwords, like team-oriented, compassionate, financially responsible, and accountable to describe yourself.

    3) Do you interview well?
    Even if you have the most stellar resumé in the world, with credentials dripping from the page, chock full of value statements and buzzwords, if you have a poor interview style, no one will hire you.

    Many studies have shown that managers hire people who they think will be great to work with. That's almost a no-brainer. But what it means for you is that you have to wow that manager during the interview process and show her just how awesome you are.

    If you are shy, get overly nervous, talk to your chest, and come across as a hermit, this sends up red flags for a manager. If you are loud and obnoxious, checking your cell phone and generally showing poor etiquette, you will definitely not get a call back.

    Get a friend to help you and practice mock interviews. There are many websites that offer sample interview questions. Practice answering them in front of your friend and ask for honest feedback. This alone will greatly improve your chances of getting hired.

    After you go through all this, you will more than likely land a job within a month or two. How do I know, you ask? I have been on four interviews as a nurse and have been offered four jobs. I have sent out maybe a dozen targeted resumés and have received ten calls for interviews. I have used the strategies above to do this. I hope they work just as well for you.

    I am sorry you are having a hard time right now, but I wish you the best of luck.
    Last edit by canigraduate on Jan 15 : Reason: stylistic corrections
    lovelylady3, MAtoBSN, Meriwhen, and 4 others like this.
  5. 0
    I think the key is coming up with a creative resume that stands out from others (sounds a lot easier than it is I know). There are a few websites that offer editing and advice that you could try using. Some are really good! I used one myself and that's how I found my first job after graduating.

    Best of luck!
  6. 0
    Soo I'm not sure what part of the country you live in, but that could play a part. Do you have a bachelors, associates or diploma? I'm not sure if your trying primarily get a job in the hospital or if you don't mind what facility your in. One of the issues I ran into was either I didn't have my bachelors or I didn't already have a year of nursing experience. I did eventually find a job in a hospital, but it was through a nurse residency program, which I think may be your best bet to get into a hospital. But I'm not exactly sure what your goals are.
    If I hadn't gotten a job offer for my job, I was going to look at boosting up my application by getting my ACLS and PALS. Also I thought about getting my license in another state (which I am not a fan of). Maybe try some volunteering or like someone else suggested work as an aide or unit secretary to get your foot in the door.
  7. 0
    It may not be legal for you to work under your license. Many hospitals will not allow an RN to work as anything other than an RN or administrative/quality assurance capacity. I cannot work as an unit clerk or paramedic once I become an RN. It has to do with insurance and ethical duties. They cover patient care techs differently than an RN.

    Honestly, I would look at moving or expand your search. Moving may be a good option. Figure there is probably at least 150 students graduating in your area each semester. All of those 150 students want a spot in a hospital. Hospitals cannot keep on just hiring new grads.

    I'd look into getting an RN to BSN if you don't already. Some continue on to NP or other fields. My ex's mom became an infectious control nurse with a MHP.
  8. 5
    I can tell you that ceasing the job search absolutely guarantees you won't get the job. You miss 100% of the shots you don't take. I know you are frustrated. It's a rough economy. What other choice do you have but to keep looking though? Have your moment of self pity (we all have been there one way or another) but then square your shoulders and get back at it. There are plenty of rural places in the US that need nurses. If you are willing to go overseas, be willing to move within the US. Suggested places - along the Mexican border. Rural portions of just about any state. Indian reservations.

    You were given great advice by Canigraduate and others above. Deep breath, pick yourself up. I'll be thinking good thoughts for you and watching for your "I got the job!" Post.
    Nrsasrus, Meriwhen, poppycat, and 2 others like this.
  9. 0
    Just to make sure your resume and cover letter is perfect you could call the career services department at your former collage and ask them to review them for you. They can make recommendations that might help you. I know the career services department at my former university will review resume's and cover letters and give recommendations all for free. I was also told by a nurse to show up on the floor you want to work on and introduce yourself to the nurse manager. Good luck!
  10. 0
    You can also contact hospitals' HR departments and see if they have any kind of job shadowing programs. Shadowing nurses in the different fields you want to work in will help you create contacts that could lead to jobs.
  11. 0
    Nurse Jackie, have you tried hospice?? Have you tried going to job fairs , or going door to door to SNF. Private duty??. I just graduated and passed my boards and havejust actively began job hunting. I printed my resumes and have been going to SNF and doing on site application. I just attended a job fair that seems promising. I have a second interview for Monday. I am being optimistic. I wish you the best.


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