What is the first thing you do when you put a fall-risk pt in the bed? - page 2

As nurse what is the first thing you do when you put a pt in the bed that is a fall risk... Read More

  1. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    2
    Bed in low locked position, side rails up, fall risk bracelet on, bed alarm, posey alarm, floor mat (<--whichever combo fits) slip proof socks, call bell in reach, educate on fall prevention, frequent checks for bathroom or any other need and 1:1 sitter if needed.....
    joanna73 and herring_RN like this.
  2. Visit  workingharder profile page
    9
    I pray to God my shift ends before the inevitable happens.
    Altra, ybanurse, LTCNS, and 6 others like this.
  3. Visit  Dazglue profile page
    1
    Quote from KatieP86
    Urgh, and when she falls and fractures something, you can bet nursing management won't be taking the blame.
    This happened to us recently. Lady needed 1 on 1 care and her family abandoned her. Well, she was put in her room so everyone could get report and not even a full minute later BAM...fractured skull....all while TJC was there. Management had the "deer in the headlights" look b/c we all charted we have been contacting family to sit with her but they declined daily, we charted that management and the doctors were aware but we were not allowed to get a sitter, but somehow it was our fault. She even told two of her employees to lie. Somehow, she's still my boss. Ugh.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
  4. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    1
    We have many residents with bed alarms. If they can weight bear at all, then only 2 or 3 side rails up, because 4 side rails presents a higher risk. Residents will try to climb over 4 rails and injure themselves even worse. One of our frequent fallers slept on a mattress on the floor, because no matter what we tried, he kept getting up.
    herring_RN likes this.
  5. Visit  Blackcat99 profile page
    0
    Quote from workingharder
    I pray to God my shift ends before the inevitable happens.
    Yes. As soon as the next shift arrives, I am anxious to give report, count narcotics and to get the hell out of there quick before she falls again.
  6. Visit  MotherRN profile page
    0
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
  7. Visit  noyesno profile page
    0
    Quote from MotherRN
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
    Two or three side rails are kosh. Four not kosh.
  8. Visit  Blackcat99 profile page
    1
    Quote from K+MgSO4
    you do your own homework!

    PS herring_RN you need a Dr order for a sitter - I dont as it comes out of the nursing budget.

    Shove the bed againt a wall.................reduced area to fall by 50% bet you won't find that in a text book!
    At my LTC, we were told that we could not put the bed against a wall. Someone said that the wall was considered to be some kind of restraint???? Is this true?
    cindjo717 likes this.
  9. Visit  Glycerine82 profile page
    3
    Quote from herring_RN
    Bed alarms don’t work and won’t reduce patient falls

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2013/01/...ent-falls.html
    We have a ton of patients who hear the alarm and remember they need to get help. I find they at least deter the pt a bit.

    "No day but today"
  10. Visit  ParvulusPuella profile page
    1
    Our beds have the alarms built in, and are sensitive to about a 25% weight change. Most of our fall risk patients aren't fast enough to do more that sit at the side of the bed before someone gets in the room because the alarm is wailing. I'd say they work just fine.

    And if the pt is a huge fall risk according to our scoring criteria, we get the low bed with 3 sensitivity settings. Granted, sometimes all the pt has to do is roll over and the alarm goes off, but i'd rather silence false alarms than do all the fall paperwork.
    herring_RN likes this.
  11. Visit  KelRN215 profile page
    1
    Quote from MotherRN
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
    FOUR (as in all) side rails up are a restraint. Two or three are what's expected depending on the facility. How would two side rails up be a restraint? It's not restraining the patient in the bed, there's ample space for them to get out.
    joanna73 likes this.
  12. Visit  joanna73 profile page
    0
    Quote from MotherRN
    Just to clarify....I thought side rails up X2 = restraints (or at least I think that's what they taught in nursing school-I'm a recent grad). Not that I don't think it's a good idea, just clarifying that it's kosher
    Yes side rails can be considered a restraint. It depends on the policy where you work, and the individual resident. Many of our residents have 2 or 3 rails up for safety, because they move around a lot in bed. If the resident rolls out of bed and splits their head open on the concrete floor because no rails were up, we will have bigger issues. Safety is always your first priority.
  13. Visit  mappers profile page
    3
    Quote from Tyris
    As nurse what is the first thing you do when you put a pt in the bed that is a fall risk
    I call Housekeeping to get that falls risk bed out of the room and get me a regular bed. I hate beds that are fall risk.

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