Nurses who don't take the time to care: have you seen examples? - page 2

Hi everyone, I'm writing an essay about caring in nusing (caring meaning the "tending to the spiritual/emotional needs of the patient" part above and beyond their physical needs). Specifically,... Read More

  1. by   nightmare
    I work with a few of the "pull yourself together brigade" and how they annoy me! Sometimes a few minutes,and I mean a few minutes,is all it takes to calm someone down.I mean why should someone with terminal cancer have anxieties?!I could not believe the callous disregard for someones feelings when it was stated that this woman was " overanxious and a bit of a hypochondriac".

    I have a few patients with which it is better to spend 5 minutes listening to them so that they settle down for the night otherwise they sit with their fingers on the buzzers half the night because they cant calm down.
  2. by   RNPATL
    Quote from CyndiW35055
    Actually, a fellow student was told by an RN not to worry about doing to much for her pt. as the pt. was about to die. When the student asked the RN why she wouldn't do much, she was told by the RN that she would just be wasting time on the pt. and that she would do better by spending that time with another pt instead. The pt did die, that day in fact. The student, being assigned to that pt though, still spent the quality time with the pt, bathing her, turning her, ROM and everything. The family actually sent a letter to the hospital administrator commending her for this behavior and recommended that the hospital "grab her up before someone else does".

    The RN though, after having been heard by the students clinical instructor, received a written warning from the ADON regarding her lack of care. The RN resigned within two weeks. So, let that be a warning I guess.
    You know, I have been a nurse for a long time and I have never run into this type of behavior. Yes, I can agree that there are nurses out there that really do not belong in our profession. Perhaps I am still niave after all these years, but I really struggle to believe that a nurse would actually tell a student not to provide care to a dying patient because the care would be wasted. I have to say that I have NEVER seen this. If it is true, it is a very sad statement about the condition of our profession today ... very sad.
  3. by   Town & Country
    I haven't ever seen that, either.
    What I HAVE seen is alot of tired, overworked, frustrated nurses, who cannot adequately care for their "client" and meet the "customer's" needs.................~blech!~



    :angryfire
    Last edit by Town & Country on May 3, '04
  4. by   RNPATL
    This thread has really bothered me and after work today, I thought about it over and over. Yes, I do have a life, but for some reason I could not get this message out of my head today.

    Why on earth would a professor of nursing ask a student to write a paper about nurses not caring? How will this make you, after graduation, a better nurse? I am sure you have all run into the nurse that you don't want to be. For me, I had that same experience. Running into nurses that were down right rude to me as a student. But I learned from that experience and promised I would never be that way.

    Anyway, I guess my point is to ask the question why? Why a paper about this? Why not a paper about how to provide care to the dying patient, best practice or outcome driven information that you can implement into your practice after graduation. Maybe nursing school has changed? I am currently enrolled and almost through my BSN classes and I have never been asked to write a paper like this.

    Whatever .... just thought I would ask the question.
  5. by   Gompers
    Back when I was 16 and had recently decided to pursue nursing, I was admitted to the hospital for a couple of days for abdominal surgery. One night, I wad managed to get out of bed by myself and was sitting by my window watching the sunset, and this nurse came into my room. No greeting, just huffed, "WHAT?" I said, "Excuse me?" and she said that I had called. I told her I hadn't and that I was fine. Then she YELLED at me for wasting her time! This was on a PEDS unit!!! I decided then and there that I was NEVER going to be that kind of a nurse, EVER. I was a scared kid in the hospital by myself, and there she was yelling at me for something I didn't even do.

    Even in a busy ICU, I always try to be pleasant and assist families when they need me and answer questions when they ask them. If something crazy is going on and I'm somewhat short with a parent, it just kills me and the guilt bothers me for days. But most of the time, I love the ICU because even if I have busy patients, at least I'm right there with their families and talk to them, caring for them emotionally while I'm working. And with the babies, I love having the time to make them as comfortable as possible. I love being able to spend an entire shift on 1-2 patients, so that by the time I go home, I know that they were cared for like I'd want someone to care for my own kids.
  6. by   moia
    I have seen both..the nurse that is exhausted and really just wants to get the all the work done and doesn't have any time to stop and talk...I have seen the chatty cathy's that infantilize their patients and never make them push themselves..I think the chatty cathy is a lot more damaging then the nurse who doesn't say much.

    Part of my practice is to reassure the patient that whatever function they have they are expected to use. Some nurses just do everything and leave the patients feeling helpless.


    I don't know if I have ever seen a total lack of caring...there is always one patient that will get the most hardened cynic chatting.

    I try to aim my chattiness to those patients that are receptive...some patients need that two minutes and others really just want you to go away...caring sometimes means recognizing that some of your patients are not interested in anything you have to say...you need to respect that too.
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I too question why this was an assignment...seems the 'young eating the elders" is being propogated early in nursing school...why not teach ways to get the job done right, rather than learning how to critique currently practicing nurses???

    Caring is only part of the job and as nursing's leaders have pointed out "If caring was enough, anyone could be a nurse."
  8. by   redwinggirlie
    Forgive, as I have not read all the responses. Why are you focusing on the negatives in your paper instead of the positives?
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from RNPATL
    Why on earth would a professor of nursing ask a student to write a paper about nurses not caring? How will this make you, after graduation, a better nurse? I am sure you have all run into the nurse that you don't want to be. For me, I had that same experience. Running into nurses that were down right rude to me as a student. But I learned from that experience and promised I would never be that way.

    Anyway, I guess my point is to ask the question why? Why a paper about this? Why not a paper about how to provide care to the dying patient, best practice or outcome driven information that you can implement into your practice after graduation. Maybe nursing school has changed? I am currently enrolled and almost through my BSN classes and I have never been asked to write a paper like this.

    Whatever .... just thought I would ask the question.
    I, too wonder. This is a really different type of assignment. Maybe the prof is trying to get these guys to face negatives of nurses before they even enter the field? Trying to show them how not to be?Trying to show them how it really is? I don't know.....it's weird, is all i can say, and must be so discouraging to student nurses!
  10. by   susanna
    "Just don't care" "Only care for physical needs" "Not caring nurses"

    Hold on. There are two types of caring that are being talked about and I'm not sure which one some of you are referring to.

    There's caring (1-passive) which means letting someone's condition touch you emotionally and psychologically, which is what I think some of you mean when you say, "Some nurses just dont care!" (and thus they do the bare minumum or act coldly)

    And then there's caring (2-active) which means, disregarding how you feel psychologically, doing what you can to get the job done right in the best interests of the patient.

    For me, I'm not a nurse yet, but I don't think I could be one if it demanded that I do caring #1. That we just be to much stress for me to actually let every patient's personal situation touch me psychologically. I dont think I could go on living every day if I tried to do that because if you think about it, nurses work in the most depressing environments in the world!!!! I plan to learn and be very good at caring #2 though. I think its possible to learn to help someone without actually being compassionate with their pain. Would I be shunned/looked down upon by other nurses for not wanting to do caring #1?

    NOTE: Hee hee, sorry for the confusing phenomonology I made up....
  11. by   RN_Amy
    Quote from susanna
    "Just don't care" "Only care for physical needs" "Not caring nurses"

    Hold on. There are two types of caring that are being talked about and I'm not sure which one some of you are referring to.

    There's caring (1-passive) which means letting someone's condition touch you emotionally and psychologically, which is what I think some of you mean when you say, "Some nurses just dont care!" (and thus they do the bare minumum or act coldly)

    And then there's caring (2-active) which means, disregarding how you feel psychologically, doing what you can to get the job done right in the best interests of the patient.

    For me, I'm not a nurse yet, but I don't think I could be one if it demanded that I do caring #1. That we just be to much stress for me to actually let every patient's personal situation touch me psychologically. I dont think I could go on living every day if I tried to do that because if you think about it, nurses work in the most depressing environments in the world!!!! I plan to learn and be very good at caring #2 though. I think its possible to learn to help someone without actually being compassionate with their pain. Would I be shunned/looked down upon by other nurses for not wanting to do caring #1?

    NOTE: Hee hee, sorry for the confusing phenomonology I made up....
    I totally agree... well said.

    I think some people try to be the token "perfect nurse" when in fact not even patient wants to share everything in a psychological sense, they just need assistance with there physical needs in terms of hygiene etc.

    I myself am a very introverted person and wouldn't want to talk about my illness and hows its effecting me etc. I have my own way of coping and some people don't understand that, alot of the time I want to be left alone. I think the key to being a good nurse is recognizing this and being senstive to the needs of each individual patient.

    Also, have you noticed that whenever a competent patient for whatever reason refuses care, medications etc. is labelled as "non-compliant" yet when they ask for "too much" that are labelled "demanding"?
  12. by   jayna
    Very interesting article I SAW ONLINE about The supports and constraints of caring in nursing

    http://www.mills.edu/INTRO/AAMC/QUAR...ng03.20-28.pdf

    Staing there are caring for and caring about in nursing..Read on.
    Last edit by jayna on May 9, '04
  13. by   CCU NRS
    I thought all of these 5 were pertinent and accurate except for the part about havning too many Pts and complaining to the union etc. we don't have union here in OK


    1.) Knowing the patient is fundamental:
    "Knowing and doing what patients need";
    "Problem solving along the lines of relationships,
    spiritual concerns, physical concerns,
    and family dynamics"; "Constantly talking
    to them and listening to what they are
    telling you"; and "Creating a relationship
    with the patient so they can trust you."
    2.) Having a presence with the patient:
    "Being able to give each patient some type
    of indication that they matter"; "Making the
    patient feel like you are present"; and
    "Sometimes sitting there to let patients
    vent because they are frustrated or scared."
    3.) Doing for the patient: "For me, care is
    like an action word. I consider it a response
    to patients' needs"; and, "Doing what they
    need and making sure they don't feel any
    worse than they do about being dependent."
    4.) Advocating: ". . . Knowing when to stand
    up"; and: [When there were too many
    patients to care for adequately] "[We] were
    putting out fires a lot and just sort of got
    through the day throwing pills at people
    and hoping there were not any major emergencies.
    Then we would use the union as an
    avenue . . . and let people know this is not a
    safe condition."
    5.) Supporting: The following are examples
    of supporting that emerged from the data:
    "You are providing a place for them that is
    safe and one in which they can get well";
    "The patients feel trust in that you are
    going to take good care of them"; and
    "Delivering on that care in a friendly and
    reassuring way."

close