How do you take care of your back? - page 2

How exactly do you prevent back injuries when you have to lift, push, and pull patients around all day long? Are there any strength exercises specifically for the lower back that can help? :confused:... Read More

  1. by   lee1
    Does your hospital have a safe patient handling policy?? Do they have lift teams?? Algorithyms for lifting??? Equipment to utilize under the algorithyms?? Proper initial assessments??? Any equipment???
  2. by   elizabells
    Quote from Gompers
    How do I care for my back?

    I work in the NICU!!!! :chuckle
    Amen! I've had back problems for 10 yrs, and the NICU is the only clinical area I've been in where it wasn't screaming by the end of the day.
  3. by   perfectbluebuildings
    Ha ha Gompers I was about to post similar to yours before I read it... gonna say "work in Peds!" usually our patients are a lot smaller and parents are willing to help you lift 'em too.

    Seriously there are a lot of good tips on this thread, I will have to try some yoga or pilates sometime soon.
  4. by   lee1
    Back, muscular injuries are the largest source of disability for nurses. No other thoughts??? No one using "safe patient and handling" programs???
  5. by   talaxandra
    We have a 'no lift' policy, which I appreciate, but you're never going to be able to remove manual handling from patient care - especially on my ward: stroke and neurosciences!
    On my ward (and I think this is hospital wide) we only have electric beds, and a number of lifting machines (both hoists and standing lifters).
    In addition, I do a yoga/stretch class most weeks, and see an amazing remedil massage therapist every fortnight. Since I started seeing him, about seven years ago, I haven't had any serious back problems - before that I had four WorkCover injuries.
  6. by   rehabnurse82
    I have found out after 6 years in the field, that the best way to care for your back, is to have patience!!!!!! Call for help or go find someone to help you. Yes, they may get annoyed having to stop what they are doing, but one of these days they will need help too. I have mildly hurt my back several times trying to be SUPERNURSE, and I can't do that anymore. If you need a lift, get one! Dont try to do it on your own. Or, if you have been trained in how to use a gait belt, get one of those too. They help out alot!! Exercise helps out too, but even if you work out all the time, you can't lift everything, or everyone!! Everybody needs a good body mechanics class and good stretching exercises. But most importanty, learn to wait for help. I know that floor get crazy, call lights are horrible, and visitors can keep you occupied for hours, but you have to live with your back the rest lf your life, SO TAKE GOOD CARE OF IT!!!!
  7. by   flightnurse2b
    i have found a pilates ball is really helpful. we got one after my fiance (an RN) ended up with 3 ruptured discs. his physical therapist recommended he get one for the house and i ended up using it more. it really helps me with lower back pain!
  8. by   callmekipling
    Get thee to a gym! Learn to deadlift and/or squat. It's OK if you're not doing it with a lot of weight, though if you push just a little you'll be surprised at how strong you are / can get with time.

    Also, it's interesting to work with lighter weight, you can feel how to 'redistribute' it through bending at the waist (WITH STRAIGHT BACK) to lift with the glutes or more with the knees to put the weight on your legs.

    I use gloves and a back brace when I'm lifting in the gym, but if I'm pulling 400lb off the deck there, 250 at work isn't too hard.

    Though it can be a little uncomfortable working with fatigued muscles the next day :uhoh21:
  9. by   JOLLIEHOLLY
    Quote from Hannahr
    How exactly do you prevent back injuries when you have to lift, push, and pull patients around all day long? Are there any strength exercises specifically for the lower back that can help?

    Work in peds!!!!! hahah

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