feelings about double rooms - page 5

I was curious to see how everyone feels about double occupancy in hospital rooms. I believe that single room are the best for many reasons. 1. The patient is not bothered by other patients... Read More

  1. by   starryx2
    Ok, I wanted to add in some more comments to the thread.

    What about the younger patient, middle adulthood, that gets put in with an eldery patient, not necessarly confused, but definitly different needs, toilting ect. maybe a fall risk, and the younger patient begins to feel as though they are "babysitting" the other patient, not because they have to but because they feel they must.

    How often are two patietns together, and one ends up having some type of infection that requires isolation.

    Has any of these things happen to anybody?

    Sharing of bathrooms? especially with a patient that dosent have the best bathroom habits.

    Do you often find yourself not having enough room to work in because you are working in a double room?

    Do you think you would have an easier time communicating with your patient, without another person and family next door between a thin cutrain?

    Do you think any kind of medication errors would be avoided with a patient being in a private room vs. semi-private room?

    Hmmm I dont know just wanting to know some more opinions on the subject...
  2. by   bethin
    Quote from starryx2
    Ok, I wanted to add in some more comments to the thread.

    What about the younger patient, middle adulthood, that gets put in with an eldery patient, not necessarly confused, but definitly different needs, toilting ect. maybe a fall risk, and the younger patient begins to feel as though they are "babysitting" the other patient, not because they have to but because they feel they must.

    How often are two patietns together, and one ends up having some type of infection that requires isolation.

    Has any of these things happen to anybody?

    Sharing of bathrooms? especially with a patient that dosent have the best bathroom habits.

    Do you often find yourself not having enough room to work in because you are working in a double room?

    Do you think you would have an easier time communicating with your patient, without another person and family next door between a thin cutrain?

    Do you think any kind of medication errors would be avoided with a patient being in a private room vs. semi-private room?

    Hmmm I dont know just wanting to know some more opinions on the subject...
    I know this thread is old, but I couldn't resist.

    I've been a pt more times than I can count. With Crohn's and UC, it's a given that I'll be admitted once or twice a year. I have been put in with an elderly pt who climbed out of bed. Thinking I was at work (pt on the same floor where I work) I'd get out of bed to help her, woozy on phenergan and pain meds. I had a rommate who walked naked into the bathroom and washed her hair in the sink - the bathroom door was 3 feet from the foot of my bed. This is also the same lady who was talking to SO on the phone and told her/him all about her roommate's health problems. Also comes up to me in public to talk to me and discuss it. I've been throwing up with 3 visitors gawking at me, saying how my retching makes them sick......oh, excuse me, I must stop if that's the case.

    Had a pt who was dying of cancer. Had not told her family as they hadn't arrived yet. Roommate told them as soon as they walked into the room. Had a pt who coded and the roommate would come back in the room and yell at us for trying to save him - we had wheeled the pt to an empty room.

    Ok, I feel better.
  3. by   starryx2
    oh yeah,


    I forgot to add to my little addtion,

    what about the dying patient, or very very sick not doing very well patient, with the patient and family and patient next door, im sure that is very uplifting while in the hospital setting,
    and im sure it does wonderes when there is a code or the patient passes on, that has to really make the next door patient feel good.

    PRIVATE ROOMS!!!!
    JACHO needs to make a recommendation ASAP!!!!
  4. by   nurse-to-be1000
    Quote from mwcia12
    I must admit, I had nothing but contempt for people who demanded a private room. I judged them to be elitist snobs and they annoyed the hell out of me. Then Karma intervened. I had a severe case of peritionitis from a burst appendix (my fault, I sat on it for 24 hours before going to the ER.) Unfortunately I had recurrent bouts of obstruction from the adhesions, and each time they admitted me I demanded a private room. I had become one of "them" I must say though, why don't hospitals with semi privates provide 2 TV sets, one for each patient?
    I know my local hospital has very few semi-private rooms, like two per wing and each patient gets their own tv. It is a surprise that semis or wards are still allowed with all the talk about HIPPA. What I never understand is how one hospital will charge a patient for tv and another won't.

    Also as others have noted it is tough when two patients are in for diff reasons or have a wide diff in age. I was admitted to a rehab hosptial fully mobile and was going to be given a roommate who had to have something over the toilet so she could go easily but what about me? I know the nurses thought I was a major pain in the butt within the first hour but on the other hand it was the hospital stay from hell and I pitttied any of the patients who didn't have their facilities about them or family watching them.
    Last edit by nurse-to-be1000 on Feb 7, '07
  5. by   canoehead
    I know it's not politically correct but I like all the 8 and 16 bed wards set up in a circle with nurses in the middle. All those little old ladies were support and entertainment for each other. They looked out for each other, and just by virtue of seeing all the other patients they weren't left to stew in their own misery. Peer pressure confined all but the most determined attention seekers, and if one fell or couldn't reach a call bell the entire ward would light up with other seeking help.

    Hey, I know privacy goes right out the window on those wards, but as far as safety and moral support you can't beat a gaggle of women. Several times as a student, and also when my mom was in hospital the patients, or visiting families were able to put the brakes on abusive or neglectful behavior by medical or nursing staff.
  6. by   jjjoy
    I agree with Canoehead that there are pros and cons to any set up. Imagine how much less walking there would be if most of your patients were in one room?! Basic assessments (unlabored breathing, color good, etc) would just be a matter of course as you'd see each patient much more often in the course of providing care for others. And if you have more than 2 patients/room, it would be easier for the other patients to get another to curb their noise level. Plus the nurse would be in the room more often.

    How about keep the private rooms for those with communicable diseases and those whose conditions would demand a private bathroom?

    Well, most new hospital construction in the US have private rooms anyway. Private rooms definitely have many advantages. But there are some benefits to shared rooms as well.
    Last edit by jjjoy on Feb 13, '07
  7. by   Anjann
    As both the patient and now the nurse, I honestly feel that private rooms are the natural evolution in inpatient hospital care. I think it cuts down on hospital-transmitted infections to some degree.

    When I was sick I couldn't get comfortable for more than 20 minutes at a time the way they were running the IV, and there was no way I could do the pee-pee dance while waiting for a Crohne's patient to get out of the bathroom.

    When my sister had her baby, they lady in the bed beside her had 12 family members in the room talking very loudly all day running around the room, getting up in the bed with her and playing with the phone and medical equipment, and the baby never stopped screaming from the minute it was born because the mother didn't know she was supposed to have been breastfeeding because she did not inform the hospital that she did not understand english and the baby had received no nourishment from the mother for 2 days. So my sister left the hospital early. It was just too ridiculous to actually pay another day for that circus.

    HIPPA being the biggest reason, I don't want pt's and their family members listening in on my pt's conversation. Also, I find that my patients are much more comfortable when they have their own space, no one blaring the t.v., talking on the phone, or hollering all night, and they have the use of their own bathroom.

    I also feel more comfortable as a nurse when I am in the room alone with that patient because they know they are getting individualized attention with their privacy intact. They tend to open up more and I don't have the patient next to them interrupting my assessment to ask me for more butter for their bread! I can do a full assessment, ask questions and give answers (and meds)freely without worry about the nosy neighbor in the next bed who might actually know what AZT is used for and tell all of his family about it.

    That is just my two cents... but it might only be worth a penny!
  8. by   TalldiNY
    You answered your own question. Research TCAB rooms. They are the latest innovation. Unreality floats like the Titanic in nursing. It's unsinkable and it sinks.
    Ilove coffee
  9. by   teeituptom
    Quote from canoehead
    I know it's not politically correct but I like all the 8 and 16 bed wards set up in a circle with nurses in the middle. All those little old ladies were support and entertainment for each other. They looked out for each other, and just by virtue of seeing all the other patients they weren't left to stew in their own misery. Peer pressure confined all but the most determined attention seekers, and if one fell or couldn't reach a call bell the entire ward would light up with other seeking help.

    Hey, I know privacy goes right out the window on those wards, but as far as safety and moral support you can't beat a gaggle of women. Several times as a student, and also when my mom was in hospital the patients, or visiting families were able to put the brakes on abusive or neglectful behavior by medical or nursing staff.
    There were definite advantages to Ward Care. I remember working 20 bed wards in the military hospitals when I was young. Every body got meds at the same time. Like going around and feeding chirping birds in a nest. Dont forget Temps with the old reusable glass thermometers. Lots easier back then.
  10. by   confused101
    Quote from SharkLPN
    Hate our semi-private rooms (if 'semi-private' isn't the biggest oxymoron in the world...). I'm only slightly surprized that they're still allowed at all, seeing how anal we all have to be now because of HIPPA. How can just possibly review your pts plan of care and needs confidentially when their roomie is 5 feet away with a thin curtain between you? However, if we made my unit all private rooms, our census would drop from 31 to 22, and you know the hospital isn't going to give up 9 beds and lose the money generated from them.
    You got that right. I worked on a private room floor as a tech. It was so nice. Now I work double bed as a nurse. I go home with bruses all over me trying to get through the rooms with all of the chairs and computer stuff. Some days I begin to wonder about how HIPPA can really be done. I mean the nurses station is right there in the hall. I know someone has to hear stuff when talking about pt.'s on the phone and stuff. And you know we couldn't go singles because that would me we would loose money. What a waste!

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