Bullied for reporting a med error by another nurse

  1. 2
    Ive just been called a number of names and criticised for incident reporting that a colleague made a drug error despite it being clearly prescribed. This isn't her first error in fact its one of many but this one i felt needed to be reported so i submitted an incident report form to my manager. My colleagues now think I'm the devil and say i should of spoke to my manager first. Firstly my manager was on holiday at the time secondly i have voiced concerns previously with no action taken. I even triple checked with the doctor that it was indeed a medication error. Has anyone been in a similar position? Im leaving this job as a result of this many other things.
    lindarn and aTOMicTom like this.
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  3. 40 Comments so far...

  4. 12
    You did the right thing. I "assume" your co-workers learned of this from the nurse in question. You don't have a clue what she may have told them, but either way it does put you on the spot. You have nothing to be ashamed about. If anyone asks, suggest they talk to the nurse manager and say nothing more. More nurses need to take responsibility for patients and notify administration of non-safe practices. Good luck in your new posting.
    jalyc RN, lindarn, Jelliet, and 9 others like this.
  5. 1
    Thank you I do think there has been a lot of twisting of the facts and demonising of me. The rest all gossip about it but take no action. I'm just singled out for speaking out.
    aTOMicTom likes this.
  6. 9
    Our hospital policy is that every med error must have an incident report completed. It is not a punitive process, but it is important that they be completed in order to improve our patient care processes.
    lindarn, Jelliet, nrsang97, and 6 others like this.
  7. 4
    Quote from NICURN29
    Our hospital policy is that every med error must have an incident report completed. It is not a punitive process, but it is important that they be completed in order to improve our patient care processes.
    I truly hope that that is the real reason for the documentation and not a way for mgt to gather evidence (the easy way for them) for punitive actions against staff.
    lindarn, KyleLVN, tokmom, and 1 other like this.
  8. 7
    Quote from NICURN29
    Our hospital policy is that every med error must have an incident report completed. It is not a punitive process, but it is important that they be completed in order to improve our patient care processes.
    It's a punitive process, no matter what management says.
    lindarn, KyleLVN, Not_A_Hat_Person, and 4 others like this.
  9. 9
    Quote from VickyMcSkimming
    Thank you I do think there has been a lot of twisting of the facts and demonising of me. The rest all gossip about it but take no action. I'm just singled out for speaking out.
    I'm confused, are you and StaffNurseMcS the same person??
  10. 1
    I am not sure how the person in question knew it was you who completed the incident report. That is not something that management usually shares.

    Sounds as if your manager was up to something by saying "StaffNurseMcS wrote out an incident regarding your med error..." Not the way to be confidential, that's for sure!!

    And the pp were right. Incident reports are not meant to be punitive, however, this is a good example of why some turn out to be.

    Best of luck in your future endevours away from such a toxic dumping ground.
    lindarn likes this.
  11. 5
    Quote from StaffNurseMcS
    I even triple checked with the doctor that it was indeed a medication error.
    most med errors are fairly cut and dry and need no second opinion.

    why is it that you had to get confirmation from the md that this "med error" was indeed a med error?
    sharpeimom, poppycat, KyleLVN, and 2 others like this.
  12. 8
    First of all, understand what incident reports are: They are intended for tracking and trending.
    Secondly, whatever the med error, and you state, this is not the first one, you are not tattling but advocating for the patients of the offending nurse. You demonstrated "peer review". Don't feel bad about it and shame on your peers that may be making you feel as if you did something wrong.
    Medication errors are an opportunity to education the nurse that made the error. My nurses feel very safe and I encourage them to self-disclose, for if they made the error I'm sure their collegues are in jeopardy of making the same error. It permits nurses to learn from others mistakes before they make the same mistake.
    Congratulations for watching out for the patients.
    jalyc RN, antania31, poppycat, and 5 others like this.


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