How to NOT interview for your RN/LPN job! - page 3

by musicianRN

55,179 Views | 112 Comments

I just got finished with round 3 of the most frustrating interviews! I was an LPN for 15 years before I went back to school for my RN. I am currently in training for management so I have been "forced" to endure the interview... Read More


  1. 2
    I cover my tattoos and boobs. With pajamas and fuzzy slippers. Jk, that would be to much effort. I do have to say that as we age tattoos and piercings will be less of a deterrent. Look at the amount of younger adults with gauged (stretched) earlobes. I would rather they wear the jewelry. The holes gross me out. My tattoo goes below my elbow so you can see it when I push up my sleeves. Most pts are curious about rather than put off by it. It's very colorful. I do cover it for interviews. Which sucks in Texas summer weather. As far as other facial piercings there are plastic spacers that you can't see or looks like a little pimple. I think having a nurse wear that should be acceptable. Hope I didn't derail this. Your advice is sound.
  2. 9
    [color=#b22222]a couple of additions:

    don't bring your pets (gal came with an itty bitty dog in her purse) or children. seriously.
    don't chew gum . . . no matter how dry your mouth gets, chewing gum during an interview is just not professional.
    please don't start off the interview with a litany of things you won't do . . . such as work nights, touch poop or look at old people.
    lrobinson5, not.done.yet, g!RN, and 6 others like this.
  3. 22
    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.

    These judgemental posts about how I am sooooooo much better than you because I follow the book to a "T," and "conform to the upper-crust of this Profession" sound so shallow and "God-complex" like.

    Some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like Einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and I cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    I think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    Otherwise, I hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by Wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    Old School is Okay, but Compassion, Understanding, and Empathy are still character traits that I would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    Thanks!

    Kyle
    NurseP00kie, IrishErin, grudgrime, and 19 others like this.
  4. 13
    What does understanding the connection between professionalism and appearance have to do with patient care or compassion, empathy, or understanding? A patient is not showing me through words, actions, and yes, appearance, how they are the best qualified for a job. The two are totally unrelated. I know in my heart that these things do not matter in relation to a persons worth or value as a whole, but in the capacity of employee, co worker, or nurse who is taking care of ill people, I want someone who can understand the connection. If a person comes in with pink hair and ripped jeans, I would be concerend that they either weren't very mature or that they would not be a responsible addition to the workplace. NOT because she has pink hair and ripped jeans, but because she chose to wear them to an interview. That would make me think either she didn't really want the job or that she didn't think about the way that could be percieved. It is all well and good to say you shouldn't be judged by such things but THE REALITY IS that we are. So knowing that, if you choose to dress in such a way for a job interview, what does that say about your judgement and decision making skills? Also, no one ever said the clothes had to be expensive, just appropriate. Years ago my ex had his first interview at Dell and we were like twenty years old. He had no nice clothes and we were very poor with two kids. He bought an ill fitting suit at goodwill, and it looked a bit stupid to be honest, it was obvious looking back that he was poor, but he still got the job and there is no way in hell he would have been hired looking like he had just rolled out of bed after nightclubbing the eve before. The bad suit did not get him the job, but a sloppy presentation that did not show he took the interview seriously very well might have cost it.
  5. 11
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    Ok,

    As an ER Coordinator, I have seen a few things off in interviews, but DEAR GOD, who hurt you so?

    It almost sounds like a vent!

    I always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if I had put up a "red flag" I would have turned down one heck of a ER Tech, who is now a ER RN, One of "OUR," not "My" best on staff.
    Very few people will bother to ask why someone is dressed inappropriately. When I re-entered nursing and had to do the interview thing again I went to a thrift shop and bought two outfits for under $10.

    There is nothing about his list that I haven't read in countless interview tips articles and from Hiring Managers here on allnurses. For you to say it doesn't matter because it doesn't matter to you may cause someone to lose their chance for a job.

    The way the economy is -- it could be a very long time before that person gets another chance at it, and that makes it very un-compassionate advice.
    HMAmara, not.done.yet, noahsmama, and 8 others like this.
  6. 3
    "Do NOT come with greasy hair, no make up, un-brushed hair or wearing pajamas. I should not even have to type that."


    Ok you have to tell us about Pajama person.
    chibiRN, Altra, and badmamajama like this.
  7. 1
    bostonterrierloverrn

    what it boils down to is how bad you want the job. most managers do not care if people have tattoos or piercings, as long as the tattoos and piercings do not interfere with the job. if one comes in looking like a slob then i would think he or she has no pride in him or herself. it has nothing to do with how qualified he or she is for the job because in this tight job market there will be 10 other people just as qualified and well dressed. most places have a point system for interviewing and a good interview can tell if a person is going through hard times. yes there is a big judgment about a person; in your case you made the right one. would you have the same decisionif this was a male or if a person came in with dirty cloth and was un-kept? what about if you saw the person had not stayed any job for more than a year. interviews are all about judging people
    Last edit by jbluehorseh on Feb 16, '12 : Reason: typos
    Purple_Scrubs likes this.
  8. 9
    Quote from bostonterrierloverrn
    ok,

    as an er coordinator, i have seen a few things off in interviews, but dear god, who hurt you so?

    it almost sounds like a vent!

    i always just feel sorry for the single mom in jeans who would be wearing dress pants if she could have afforded them, if i had put up a "red flag" i would have turned down one heck of a er tech, who is now a er rn, one of "our," not "my" best on staff.

    these judgemental posts about how i am sooooooo much better than you because i follow the book to a "t," and "conform to the upper-crust of this profession" sound so shallow and "god-complex" like.

    some of the greatest minds out there have hair just like einstien, or decided to get a tattoo, and i cannot begin to imagine how you differentiate on your patient care according to how they are dressed-or look.

    i think you missed your calling for cosmotologist, or a prissy hair dresser!

    otherwise, i hope you work in a private, small, uptown hospital where you won't be ashamed by wrangler wearing blue collar workers, but doubt that since you had to post a vent about hair washing, denim, and piercings!

    old school is okay, but compassion, understanding, and empathy are still character traits that i would rather see than starch constipated china doll nurses!

    thanks!

    kyle
    perhaps it is a vent, but this is a good place for it. i'm not understanding why you feel the need to excoriate the original poster, whose heart seems to be in the right place. while everyone should know these things, it's obvious that many don't.

    the single mom wearing jeans could probably have found a pair of dress pants for under $10 at goodwill or st. vincent de paul. there are also programs at the ywca in many cities where clothing appropriate for job interviews is available for free or for a very small fee. the applicant in pajamas clearly didn't want a job -- probably just wanted to have appearance of looking for a job so she could continue to get welfare or whatever.

    i was sitting in hr waiting for my interview several years ago, and several women came in dressed as described in the original post . . . shorts, flip flops, visible body art, dirty hair and accompanied by small children and pets. they asked for applications and filled them out illegibly with purple and pink ink. then they loudly announced that they wouldn't be working nights, weekends or holidays because "i have a life." the hr receptionist told me that these same "ladies" appear every week like clockwork because if they don't "look for work" they cannot continue to receive benefits.

    i see nothing wrong with an interviewer choosing the candidate who dressed appropriately for the interview above someone who didn't take the time or effort to be dressed neatly (pjs, for pity's sake!), shampoo and style their hair or cover up tattoos. in this economy, one ought to err on the side of conservative dress, hiding body art and being as neat and clean as possible. not everyone is as dismissive of these basics as you seem to be.


    not.done.yet, Altra, kids, and 6 others like this.
  9. 7
    Hiring is an opinionated thing. First you have to realize that it is not a "fair" thing.
    You will be judged. That is what the hiring process is all about. Gone are the days when you could show up with an unblemished license and no criminal record and get hired. It's a buyer's market.

    The buyer (hirer) has her/his choice of many qualified applicants. You should show up looking neat, clean, presentable, and not looking like you are a circus freak who just crawled out of bed.

    If you don't like it, too bad. As I said, it's a buyers market. You are the seller. You have to make the package resemble what the buyer needs AND wants. Period.

    For me it's all of those things mentioned and shoes. If I see someone come in to interview with nasty shoes it shows a clear lack of attention to detail. Not interested, thanks.
    Last edit by DixieRedHead on Feb 16, '12 : Reason: spelling
    mimigins, not.done.yet, whereslilly, and 4 others like this.
  10. 4
    Just wanted to say thanks for the original post. It should be framed and placed in the office of every guidance/career counselor's office. For the one who replied about the single mom with jeans who got the job and turned out to be great- she was dog-gone lucky to get someone who would give her a chance. Everyone else, I wouldn't take the risk,the interviewer is not likely to be as understanding and forgiving as that one was. Like it or not, if you're going out job-hunting, you've need to have something else in your closet besides scrubs, jeans and pj's. If you're trying to move up in the world, you need to look the part. That's really what you're doing- you're auditioning for a part and the interviewer is trying to decide in a few minutes if you're the one who should play it. That's every reason to give yourself an advantage.

    Agree with OP about the tats and piercings- however you feel about it, the employer has to play to the likes and dislike of their customer base. So, until you know more about the organization and how they feel about body art, you best hide it.

    The point about not complaining about others is valid as well- red flag to anyone who breathes a hint of conflict and difficulty at their previous job, unless you're going to tell how you championed the situation and made everyone live at peace with one another. Blessed are the peacemakers.
    NRSKarenRN, JulieL, Aviationurse, and 1 other like this.


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