Discussing benefits during interview?

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    Question for experienced nurses: do you broach the topic of benefits during an interview?

    My DH works in a different industry and typically has 2-3 interviews for a job, so he usually discusses things like salary or benefits during the second or third interview, once he's already made a good impression and knows that an offer is coming. I think this is important for several reasons. I've had two nursing jobs and my most recent job has made it miserable to take any time off. Travelling is a huge part of my personal life and in the future, I'd like to know that my employer would be supportive of taking time off. I'm tired of working for companies that don't want to give you the vacation you earned and deserve. However, most of the time in nursing there is only one interview and I don't want to come off as money-hungry by bringing this up during the interview. Then by the time they call to make the job offer, it's too late to discuss something like that.
  2. 4 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    I don't ask -- in my experience, employers typically have a routine in which someone from HR contacts you and reviews the benefits package along with the salary, either in person or by telephone, before a formal job offer is made. I don't need to bring it up, because the info is going to be provided later in the process.
    barbyann likes this.
  4. 0
    Sometimes HR will give you a booklet when you interview that gives an overview of benefits. And when they offer you the job is definitely not too late. Just say, I'm definitely interested, but I'd like to get some information regarding the benefits package. The last 2 places I worked had it accessible on their websites, as long as they told you where to look.

    Benefits add 1/3 to 1/2 to your total compensation, so they expect you to ask at some point
  5. 0
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    Sometimes HR will give you a booklet when you interview that gives an overview of benefits. And when they offer you the job is definitely not too late. Just say, I'm definitely interested, but I'd like to get some information regarding the benefits package. The last 2 places I worked had it accessible on their websites, as long as they told you where to look.

    Benefits add 1/3 to 1/2 to your total compensation, so they expect you to ask at some point
    ^ This!!

    The job I interviewed and hired for was very upfront about benefits, volunteer opportunities, work-life balance, clinical ladder/salary conditions, etc.

    I usually ask because I think it is important to have time to travel, think about retirement, being able to keep on top of one's health, etc. Those are important, and IMHO, if someone takes me as selfish, or out for money, then I don't need to get hired. I think a happy employee makes a better employee, and most places hiring SHOULD want to attract great nurses and give people to want to work at their health system. Best to be upfront and run a script like MrChicagoRN has suggested, so you can make the best decision and advocate for your career.
  6. 1
    Generally, if someone overtly asks about benefits early in the interview it can be viewed negatively. The interview (particularly if it is with the hiring manager, not with HR) is the time to understand the unit's culture, leadership and ultimately determine if the job is a good fit for you. Usually, there isn't enough time to ask about benefits in that scenario. Astute questions about work-life balance, clinical ladders, coaching and development practices and how schedule requests are handled can help uncover information about benefits without asking overtly.

    By all means in a subsequent interview or when HR calls to offer a position, I agree with MRChicagoRN, have your list of questions developed and respectfully seek the answers to those questions prior to reaching your decision about the offer. Remember, this is your chance to interview this employer, just as much as it's the prospective employers chance to interview you.
    NRSKarenRN likes this.


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