Funniest/strangest dementia patient stories - page 11

I'm sure we all have them, especially those of us who have worked in LTC. Here are some of mine: -climbing into other residents' beds and taking a nap...one time we found the resident sleeping in... Read More

  1. by   Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.

    Inpatient geropsych unit, free-standing mental health hospital. Female patient who didn't seem to have much memory left, walked by the desk where we had a copy of the patient rules and regulations out on the counter. Stopped, picked up the paper, read aloud word for word what was on the paper, put it down, and immediately walked into another patient's room.

    Inpatient adult mental health unit. Male patient from our companion geropsych unit came over to sit in the activity room. Spotted the piano, sat down and played beautifully (this man couldn't remember his own name).

    Same unit as above. Male patient from geropsych unit, convinced that he was the President of the United States. Wasn't happy until I agreed to sit down with him and listen to his ideas about foreign policy.
  2. by   bagladyrn
    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.

    Inpatient geropsych unit, free-standing mental health hospital. Female patient who didn't seem to have much memory left, walked by the desk where we had a copy of the patient rules and regulations out on the counter. Stopped, picked up the paper, read aloud word for word what was on the paper, put it down, and immediately walked into another patient's room.

    Inpatient adult mental health unit. Male patient from our companion geropsych unit came over to sit in the activity room. Spotted the piano, sat down and played beautifully (this man couldn't remember his own name).

    Same unit as above. Male patient from geropsych unit, convinced that he was the President of the United States. Wasn't happy until I agreed to sit down with him and listen to his ideas about foreign policy.
    Orca - I'm going to be the old lady from your first example someday.
    Maybe we need to create a special unit for old healthcare workers with a mockup nurses station. Would keep us all occupied and out of everyone's hair!
  3. by   Hygiene Queen
    Quote from Orca
    Several come to mind. Inpatient geropsych unit in a metropolitan hospital, female patient who seemed to have her days and nights inverted, resisted being put to bed at night. Would walk the halls checking doors and looking in rooms. Found out after talking to family members that she was a retired RN who worked night shift for many years. I noticed that when she checked doors, it wasn't as if she was trying to escape the unit, but rather that she was checking to make sure that the doors were secured. If we let her sit in the nurse station for a few minutes and arrange papers, she was much happier because she believed that she was helping.
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.
    Last edit by Hygiene Queen on Oct 7 : Reason: spelling
  4. by   jodispamodi
    I worked as an aide in a snf many years ago and was also a ff/emt-p, then worked in geropysch for a couple of years. Some of my favorites:
    The lady with prolapsed uterus (in her 90's) who kept asking why she had a balloon "there" (thus was a huge prolapse and couldnt be fixed) and her 70+ year old dementia daughter who kept yelling "oh my god, its gonna pop".
    There was the guy who was a wandered that I did a 1-1 with all night, he was mentally back in the 40's and thought I was a british bomber pilot! He asked me where I was stationed and I said , uh England(???), it got even trickier when he started asking me about my plane,lol. Then he told me he knew he wouldnt get lost with me because I was a wwII bomber pilot and had to have a good sense of direction.
    Then there was the end stage dementia guy who thought I was his son (i'm a female,lol) he got up one elbow in bed, peered at me closely and said "you know Mark, you just don't look like you", then to top matters off he somehow became convinced my HAND was a PHONE, and spent the night grabbing my hand and making phone calls on it and having lengthy conversations with his friends (sigh) it was hysterical but also sad.
  5. by   Orca
    Quote from Hygiene Queen
    I also worked geropsych. We had a dementia patient -- and former nurse-- who would take off running down the hall yelling, "Call the pharmacy! Call the pharmacy! I've made a med error!".

    Talk about being trapped in Hell.
    That will be my luck. When my mind has drifted off into nothingness, instead of some remote beach, in my mind I will be at work.

    Another dementia story. Hospital inpatient geropsych unit. I was in the report room giving report to the oncoming shift when I heard an overhead announcement for a mental health emergency - for my unit. I opened the report room door to see what was going on, and I was shot in the face with a chemical fire extinguisher by a male patient who had removed it from its case on the wall and was spraying it all over the unit. All of the dust set off the smoke alarms. Three people from other floors, believing that we had a fire, reported to the unit with fire extinguishers. I told them, "Thanks for coming, but we have one too many of those here already."
  6. by   YumCookies
    A few months ago, my 80 year old lady rang her call bell to tell us that the patient next door walked into her room, peed on the floor, and left. She was a good sport about it - she laughed and said she just wanted to make sure he was okay.

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