What exactly does PRN mean?

  1. 0
    Hi all,

    I just graduated with my RN. My plan is to work FT in the hospital for one year then work one day per week after that, as I have young children at home. I want to work that one day PRN, I think. What does it mean to work PRN? I know you get paid more than salaried employees, you don't get benefits and you only work you're needed. But does it mean they can place you anywhere in the hospital? Can I stay on my same floor on PRN status? Does being PRN mean you're an agency nurse? How much more $ per hour do you get PRN in general (I'm in Florida)? Here, you can switch to PRN status after only six months- I don't need the benefits...are there pros and cons to doing this?

    Thanks for the info!
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  3. 10 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Quote from abcdefg
    Hi all,

    I just graduated with my RN. My plan is to work FT in the hospital for one year then work one day per week after that, as I have young children at home. What does it mean to work PRN? I know you get paid more than salaried employees, you don't get benefits and you only work you're needed. But does it mean they can place you anywhere in the hospital? Can I stay on my same floor on PRN status? Does being PRN mean you're an agency nurse? How much more $ per hour do you get PRN in general (I'm in Florida)? Here, you can switch to PRN status after only six months- I don't need the benefits...are there pros and cons to doing this?
    Congratulations on graduating as an RN and having young children at home. When I have worked PRN it was for the unit I was on. I made several dollars more an hour and usually ended up working as much as I wanted. In fact I have worked months full time as a PRN! If someone needed to float that could have been me. You aren't considered agency but a category of nursing employment. Hope that helps, and don't wear yourself out full time!
  5. 0
    Oh, nevermind. I misread the OP. sheesh.
  6. 1
    At our hospital, there are different levels of PRN contracts. I am currently a department based (ER) RN at the lowest pay tier for PRN....but that is because I *choose* not to float and my only committment is 4 times per month. This means I am required only to work four 12hr shifts a MONTH, one major holiday and 2 minor holidays. I do NOT float. EVER. They call me all the time wanting me to work more. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't. If I want extra Christmas $$ or whatever, then I just sign up for more shifts.

    There are other "tiers" of PRN that pay a bit more, but require you to float to other units, work more hours,etc. Even at the lowest tier, I still make quite a bit more than regular $$ and the shift diff is SWEET. I usually work a weekend day while my husband is home with our child. It works out really well.

    I don't get benefits (we use my husband's insurance) but I DO get dollar to dollar matching on the company based 401K. I signed up for a disability policy through an independent agent. While we don't depend on my $$ for income, it would be kind of a dent if something happened and I could not work. If you are PRN, you do not get ST disability. Just something to think about, especially since you have young children at home.

    Unless you have a lot of experience in different units, I highly recommend you only sign up to be unit based. If they don't need you, you are canceled instead of floating. It is hard enough keeping up with your skills while working just once a week........I can't imagine keeping up with ed requirements for several different units.
    mtstringer likes this.
  7. 0
    If I don't have my RN or CNA can I still work as a PRN or do I have to have a nursing degree of some sort
  8. 0
    How much exp. do they usually require before going PRN???
  9. 0
    I was working full time until my babysitter gave me a days notice and quit on me. I had to change to a PRN status. My hospital has different levels of PRN contracts like carachel2.
    I never needed the benefits and ended up making 12 dollars more an hour. I could work full time hours and then some if I wished. I am obligated to work 12 12 hour shifts per 6 week cycle which equals 2 days a week.
    I have only been called off one time.
    As far as floating...well, they do float us to the ICU on occasion. I would check on your unit's floating policy, it's different everywhere.

    Good luck to you, PRN has been a blessing with regard to schedule (I have little ones at home too.)
  10. 8
    Hi All,
    For all you people who do not know what PRN means:
    PRN stands for Pro Re Nata and this is Latin for: "as the situation arises"!
    Diddy
    poopoobuddy, rocokeef, Cristae, and 5 others like this.
  11. 0
    As a PRN, can you pick the days out of the week that you want to work or is it up to the hospital? For example if I only wanted to work monday and thursday would I be able to do that? Do you just have to fill your quota by the end of the month or is it a weekly schedule? I am thinking about running a part time training business as well as becoming a nurse and I was wondering with scheduling if it is possible??? Thank you in advance for any feedback!
  12. 0
    Quote from morganrt1416
    As a PRN, can you pick the days out of the week that you want to work or is it up to the hospital? For example if I only wanted to work monday and thursday would I be able to do that? Do you just have to fill your quota by the end of the month or is it a weekly schedule? I am thinking about running a part time training business as well as becoming a nurse and I was wondering with scheduling if it is possible??? Thank you in advance for any feedback!
    Different hospitals have different expectations and requirements -- your best bet is to clarify precisely with a particular hospital you want to work (prn) for what you would be agreeing to if you take a prn position.


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