Letting LPN's give report at end of shift instead of the RN "covering" ?

  1. LPN's on my particular unit (acute surgical) are NOT allowed to give report on the patients that they have taken care of that shift.
    Instead the RN "covering" those specific patients have to "get report from the LPN that took care solely for that patient, then give THE SAME REPORT to the next shift.
    On the other units of my hospital, the LPN's are allowed to give report.
    There is one particular nurse on my unit that has solely made this decision. She is a nun and her titled is the same as the rest of the unit, "staff nurse" but everyone seems to be afraid of her. If she finds out that an LPN gave report, she lets her feelings known, both verbally and nonverbally.

    give your opinion. thank you in advance.

    Kathy Downey, RN
    Ohio


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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   PathFinder
    Hey Kathy --
    Saw your post and couldn't resist.
    What is the point of report?
    Do we offer report to parrot back a set of facts that are already on the Kardex or in the chart?
    Do we do report in such wrote fashion that ANYONE could offer report without having anything really "new" or "thoughtful" to offer?

    Here's what I think --
    Anyone can give report (it is not a sacred duty) if s/he knows what is going on with the patient!
    Our job (as the RN) is to MANAGE THE PATIENT'S CARE and if report doesn't activate that skill set, probably something is wrong with the report system, not the person rendering the report!

    Think about the information that actually moves from care-giver to care-giver in your report format. Is it valuable? Is it news? Does it help you make care-management decisions for your shift? Does it help you steer the patiet toward goals or outcomes?

    If it doesn't do any of this, who cares what the title is of the individual who mouths the words?

    Think about it!
  4. by   MaxNurse
    I don't see why an LPN can't give report to the oncoming staff. Seems the one actually taking care of the patients would be able to give a more indepth report. I know where i work we have LPNs who have specific duties and there's a RN that is the charge nurse, the LPNs give report to each other and the RNs give report to one another. This is good in my opinion, concidering there's been many times while giving or receiving report that there's been an "oh yeah i almost forgot to tell you...." This is what i would consider being a con of only RNs giving report, you may forget something and when she gives report she wouldn't know it, therefore something important could be missed. Seems also it's more time comsuming to first give report to your RN and then she in return gives it to the next shift. Does she give it directly to another RN and then that RN has to give report to the oncoming LPNs?? Once again i see the possiblity of info not being translated correctly nor completely. There's nothing like getting it directly from the horse's mouth, so to speak. Sounds like the RN you are talking about my have a big case of RNitis!! This is so sad. In my state the only difference in the duties of RNs and LPNs is that a RN can give patients blood. Other than that, with the proper training an LPN can do anything a RN can do, even be a charge nurse. Is there another supervisor you can voice your concerns to?
  5. by   CANRN
    In the hospital I work at, the LPN's DO give report on the patients they cared for all shift! It does not make much sense to me to have an RN give report on a patient or patients she has not seen but maybe long enough to hang an IVPB or to push an IV med. This 'attitude' that nun/nurse has is totally out of line! When I first graduated and got my first job (I am an RN) it was the veteran LPN's who taught me the most!!!

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    Cindy Nye RN
    http://www.geocities.com/Wellesley/3924 Cynthia's Spot On The Universe
    http://members.xoom.com/CANRN97 Healthy Solutions
    http://www.geocities.com/Wellesley/3924/webnurse.html Nurses On The Web
  6. by   Ej
    Please excuse the ignorance but I came across this site and found some of the topics interesting....I'm a newly registered nurse in Ireland and I was curious as to what an LPN is?? As for giving reports at the beginning of new shifts - I think they can be useful if given over correctly - especially if you have been off duty for a number of days...over here either an RGN or and EN can give reports.
  7. by   vawoman123
    where i work they sometimes, make the lpn give report, and also team lead on one side. i have team lead, but i dont give end of shift report, as i feel the rn's should do this.
  8. by   Nancy1
    In LTC there may only be an LPN working the floor while there is an RN available at all times. The most important thing we all need to remember is it is the patient, resident, client (whatever term your organization chooses to use) is the reason we are here in the first place. So the one who does the care and has first hand knowledge should be giving report to the next shift. To my way of thinking if A is reporting to B who then reports to C, there is too much room for error. NA
  9. by   tinkaboo12
    I am a LPN in Indiana a MED-Surg float at our local hospital. I give report on all my pts. As a float I float to and work in all areas of my hospital even crital area and the ER, if you have your ACLS. The only thing that the RN's in my hospital do that I don't is the admission assessment.
  10. by   txspadequeenRN
    I may be wrong here but if you dont trust a LVN to give report ,why do you trust them to take care of the patients. I have been giving report for years in all areas and find this whole situation irritating. Everyone knows nurses have limited time as it is, and to have someone require double report is crazy. Plus information gets mixed up when it travels through to many hands...
  11. by   NRSKarenRN
    Update: ORIGINAL POST IS FROM 2000.

    Since 1977 when I became LPN and was night charge nurse on 26 bed Medical unit, I gave report---only nurse on duty!
    After obtaining RN in 1982, those LPN's I worked with gave report on own patients; I added anything else pertinent personally did.

    Licensed professional caring for patient reports off to next shift, PERIOD.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Oct 25, '04
  12. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    all the time...whether in ltc, sub-acute, or acute settings. it's within the scope of practice. makes perfect sense to have the person doing the primary care of patient give shift report.

    that said... i can also see the logic in having staff lpns & rns report-off to the next shift with the off going & on coming rn charge nurses present in acute care...if for nothing else...for the mere fact that said rn charge nsg *is* ultimately responsible for the coverage of the patients on the unit. i also think it's a good idea for the ltc charge nurses, whom are often lpns, do the same thing. lpn charge nurses may not *cover* for other nurses per say...but they have a responsibility to report to the house supervisor (mostly rns), make calls to mds/apns, & families...when patients go down in emergency situations. no charge nsg (lpn or rn) should be taken off guard because they *wasn't aware* of a situation that any staff nurse fail to mention to them earlier. that's why the charge nurse(s) are suppose to check with their staff nurses throughout the shift...obtaining 'mini reports.' i'm not saying that they should be breathing down anyone's neck...just check-in to keep abreast of what's happening so that the shift runs smoothly.

    i personally can't stand taped reports because if clarification is needed...well it can't really be done. many like taped reports because they're supposed to be quicker. but having everyone present at report does make report go by more smooth & efficiently....imo.

    cheers,
    moe
  13. by   11:11
    There are so many times Ive recieved a terrible report or none at all....

    ie the other day I was forced into the postition of giving a lousy report as the pt had three RN's in a 12 hour period, was handed off to me, then handed off to another RN before I ever assumed care. I gave report to an RN that kept asking me questions and I had to remind her I never took care of the pt. And this is in a world reknown teaching hospital ICU. There is a chart and MAR to look in for worse case scenario.

    I personaly think there is a big difference between RN and LPN thats my opionion. But if an LPN took care of the pt then they should be reporting off. To do otherwise should be illegal-

    FWIW
  14. by   jhushon
    Quote from kdblueey
    LPN's on my particular unit (acute surgical) are NOT allowed to give report on the patients that they have taken care of that shift.
    Instead the RN "covering" those specific patients have to "get report from the LPN that took care solely for that patient, then give THE SAME REPORT to the next shift.
    On the other units of my hospital, the LPN's are allowed to give report.
    There is one particular nurse on my unit that has solely made this decision. She is a nun and her titled is the same as the rest of the unit, "staff nurse" but everyone seems to be afraid of her. If she finds out that an LPN gave report, she lets her feelings known, both verbally and nonverbally.

    give your opinion. thank you in advance.

    Kathy Downey, RN
    Ohio



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    I'm sorry, but am I the only one who sees this as nothing more than a power trip?
    I have been an RN for 12 years and supervised many LPN's and the only time I would give their report would because they were too busy. I would hope I would know enough to give an adequate report but the horses mouth is always better. (I'm sure we all played "telephone" when we were small)
    Last edit by jhushon on Dec 13, '04

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