The Power Of Prayer in Healthcare - page 4

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

9,508 Views | 46 Comments

According to Oxford Dictionaries, prayer is defined as a solemn request for help or expression of thanks addressed to God or another deity. Although people usually associate praying with organized religion, prayers can... Read More


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    Quote from Pistachio
    Then I guess I should quit if it's God alone I guess the patients don't need my care. No worries about checking the six rights and all that either God will just intervene if he wants them to live and if not it was his will, not my negligence.
    Wow don't take things so literally. God (meaning Jesus) is the one who directs you to check the six rights and helps you to provide quality care. I refuse to argue nor even debate. You will see
    Poopsiebublnose likes this.
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    Quote from Pistachio
    Then I guess I should quit if it's God alone I guess the patients don't need my care. No worries about checking the six rights and all that either God will just intervene if he wants them to live and if not it was his will, not my negligence.
    Why? I believe God uses you to help answer our prayers. I believe He created us all with special talents (The things that we love to do) as tools or agents who carry out actions to answered prayers.
    leslie :-D likes this.
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    i sincerely believe that there are disguise angels among us...just saying
    leslie :-D likes this.
  4. 2
    Quote from GitanoRN
    I sincerely believe that there are disguise Angels among us...just saying
    I do too and demons around us also.
    leslie :-D and Poopsiebublnose like this.
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    Quote from agreer2
    wow don't take things so literally. god (meaning jesus) is the one who directs you to check the six rights and helps you to provide quality care. i refuse to argue nor even debate. you will see
    "all preordained-
    a prisoner in chains-
    a victim of venomous fate.
    kicked in the face,
    you can't pray for a place
    in heaven's unearthly estate. "



    Quote from gitanorn
    needless to say,sometimes you hear someone say, "we've done all we can, the only thing we can do now is pray"...just saying ~
    to me, that is synonymous with saying "we're sol if what we already did doesn't work".
    Last edit by kabfighter on Aug 4, '12 : Reason: Felt like it
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    Sad that so many people in healthcare, surrounded by a wealth of truth, scientific knowledge, exploration and teamwork (humanity), still believe in imaginary people. "Two hands working can do more than a thousand clasped in prayer..." It must be easier to choose ignorance than to think for oneself?
  7. 1
    Quote from malamud69
    Sad that so many people in healthcare, surrounded by a wealth of truth, scientific knowledge, exploration and teamwork (humanity), still believe in imaginary people. "Two hands working can do more than a thousand clasped in prayer..." It must be easier to choose ignorance than to think for oneself?
    Well, statistics prove that the United States is still very much a Christian nation by an overwhelming majority. In fact, nearly 80 percent of people in this country identify as Christians.

    http://religions.pewforum.org/reports/

    Why mock or ridicule someone's faith and/or religious beliefs if it makes the person feel good? If one has nothing nice to say, it is better to not say anything at all.
    Poopsiebublnose likes this.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    Well, statistics prove that the United States is still very much a Christian nation by an overwhelming majority. In fact, nearly 80 percent of people in this country identify as Christians.

    Statistics on Religion in America Report -- Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

    Why mock or ridicule someone's faith and/or religious beliefs if it makes the person feel good? If one has nothing nice to say, it is better to not say anything at all.
    Not mocking...just expressing my belief that too much superstition in the workplace is a detriment and I would challenge anybody that claims to be "christian" to actually coherently explain what that means. There is a vast amount of conflicting evidence and inconsistencies surrounding "christianity" And besides...are christians the only people who tout prayer...the statistic you present is very much bigoted in my view...Nurses/health professionals...trained in science??? When did this forum become so "inclusive"...
    apocatastasis likes this.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    Well, statistics prove that the United States is still very much a Christian nation by an overwhelming majority. In fact, nearly 80 percent of people in this country identify as Christians.

    Statistics on Religion in America Report -- Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life

    Why mock or ridicule someone's faith and/or religious beliefs if it makes the person feel good? If one has nothing nice to say, it is better to not say anything at all.
    I would add...as an asst admin? Why(would you not) exclude(choose) some of the other "opinions" that seem contradictory and mocking in their tone? The thread is full of them...just wondering why I was so special...
  10. 0
    Quote from Tragically Hip
    We provide evidence based care. But then, when it comes to religious belief, we don't? We practice faith-based care? Would you like to fly in an airplane designed on faith, or would you rather fly on an airplane designed on evidence-based principles?

    Anecdotes mean little. We call all think of a hundred anecdotes to support any idea, from alien abduction to the effectiveness of intercessory prayer. We also tend to suffer from confirmation bias — we forget about the many people who are prayed for, but who have bad outcomes. We also tend to think that the occurrence of an unlikely event is a miracle, when unlikely events happen all the time.

    Intercessory prayer is for the benefit of the one reciting the prayer. It gives people a sense of purpose when there is nothing they can actually do (and in some cases, they don't wish to do anything that costs them time or money).

    Long-Awaited Medical Study Questions the Power of Prayer (New York Times, 2006):



    Some people believed bleeding out the bad humours when a person had an infection, some do not. Some people believe that, for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, prayer is sufficient. Others believe that chemotherapy is a better idea.

    We're talking about people's lives here. If praying comforts them, or rubbing a rabbits foot does, whether they're the patient or the family, then by all means, they can do as they like. I am concerned about validating magical thinking, though.

    There may be a physiological benefit for oneself in doing meditation, or praying, which might have the same effect meditation, but there is not a single shred of good empirical evidence that it does anything at all for anyone else. And it's a curious thing among those who adhere to God-based religions. They are telling God what to do, as if he's a child who knows no better, or a tyrant at whose feet they must throw themselves in order to receive mercy. Is it a matter of popularity, and God will help those who can get a church-full of people to pray for them, but the person without friends is screwed?

    Get back to me when a church-full of praying people get God to regenerate a lost limb.

    I am very curious over the amount of spirituality on display on this Web site, and I mean all over. I've never seen anything like it among any group of professionals, much less, among those practicing a science-based, evidence-based profession. Is it a function of the personality types attracted to the profession, or to helping professions involving personal care? Is it a function of gender?

    Those questions deserves further study.

    Hear! Hear! correlation does not equal causation (basic psychological premise)


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