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khminh

khminh

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khminh has 1 years experience.

khminh's Latest Activity

  1. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    No problem. What I said is my speculation. I cannot prove or disprove it. You seem to be concerned about two different things: your identity in your eyes and your identity in God's eyes. If this god you believe in is really how you describe him, your identity is unique to him. Even if your uniqueness is irrelevant to your god, it matters to other people who knows you. I think that should also make your current self special to you. Among the religions that believe in reincarnation, Buddhism stands out because it doesn't believe "the self". That's why the doctrine is that the self in the new reincarnated life relates to the self in the previous life, but they are not the same. I came from the branch of Buddhism that doesn't believe in the self, but I am not convinced of reincarnation claim. Still, you can see the idea is that a physical body infused with consciousness creates a unique individual in this particular life. No body can ever replicate you even after you're gone.
  2. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    Then you could have just said that your view about afterlife is based on the Bible. Why did you bring up other people's NDE who match up your biblical view? Are you implying that a true NDE has to lead the person to Christianity? Your interest in answering questions like OP is indeed interesting. What a good Christian tactic!
  3. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    Not to burst your positivity, but I am gay actually. I have yet had the luck of meeting the right man to fulfill my romance destiny. What I said to you is an ideal situation. My uncle-in-law passed away due to pancreatic cancer. I heard from my aunt that he died without pain, with a smile, and with her by his side. That moment helped my aunt grieve more effectively seeing him gone in peace. I'm sure you are a wonderful husband. The fact that you open this topic shows that you are concerned about your unique identity with your wife. I stand by what I said earlier. Your identity is unique regardless of your afterlife. If you live by your religious faith, you know that you are special in your deity's eyes. When you read the new testament, you can see that some disciples are more prominent than others, but that doesn't negate their existence. Take James for example. Compared to Peter or Paul, he seems to be less important because of his view about faith. Still, his letter is a part of the new testament, and his view is unique. Same thing with Thomas, the doubting disciple. Jesus still took him seriously although many Christians may think of him as a bad example of faith. Because of this disciple, there are nuances of Christianity. He didn't believe until he saw evidence, but he was not an extreme skeptic, so there was still an element of faith in him. I believe that people's identity doesn't go away just because they die. No two snowballs are the same even though they are simply snow.
  4. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    I agree. Eternal sleep is not so horrible after all, is it? What you said reminds me of the last scene of The Notebook. That is what I want. My last moment on earth would be in the arms of my husband. Maybe I die before he does; maybe he would still live on for a long time after I release my last breath. Regardless, that moment to me is heavenly. I don't need to secure my place in an afterlife heaven to experience ultimate happiness. In my opinion, if my unique identity is a combination of this piece of consciousness and the physical body, it stays unique in the heart of the living people who knows me. If no body in my family is around, my identity would still be unique. When you read the Bible, you can see that Moses' faith in Yahweh was as strong as Abraham. However, Moses was not Abraham, and he never would be. In God's eyes, Abraham's identity was unique. The concern that Yahweh had for Hebrew people was because of the promise he made with Abraham even when Abraham passed away. Take Jesus for example, according to Christians, Yahweh, Jesus, and the holy spirit are the same. However, Jesus was unique. After he ascended to heaven, he left his spirit or the holy spirit on earth. When you read on the new testament, you can tell that it was not the same when Jesus, the combination of Mary's fetus and Yahweh's spirit, was no longer on earth. Of course I don't believe in the Bible, but you get the idea.
  5. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    You are a lot more humble than many Christian nurses. They are literally obsessed about their eternity. If this country is a Christian country in literal sense, I think I would choose "eternal rest" than being alive with those bigots. If the mind survives independently as you theorize, I wouldn't have to worry about where I will be after I die. Before I was born, I had no clue where my mind was. I didn't even remember what I did before I got in first grade. If that mind is a part of the ultimate consciousness, certainly it will not contain my memory when it leaves my body. Therefore, worrying about my afterlife is a waste of time. You have legitimate concern. I hope you will find the answer.
  6. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    There is nothing wrong with the way you feel. I am only rational to certain extent. Otherwise, I would be an atheist. I do believe that there is an afterlife. What exactly is that afterlife? I don't know. Afterlife is another life or a state of non existence. I have no idea. I believe in destiny. I was born on this earth to fulfill some mission. Then I will come back to wherever I came from. I suppose you can say this is God's will. If that really is, my heart would stop beating when my time comes. I think as long as I live a life filled with love, health, and a sense of fulfillment, I content being non existent. If there is a supreme being that I can call God, I think that is what he wants, too. I couldn't agree with you more. Humans are unique among animals because we are so aware of our existence. If every person on this planet lives a fulfilled life, perhaps we will not even have this discussion about afterlife.
  7. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    If being out of existence means eternal rest, I am all right with that state. Rest is not a bad thing. Sometimes life is difficult. At the end of a day, all I want is resting in my boyfriend's arms and melting into eternal rest. Since I am still living, that blissful rest is temporary. Then my consciousness is activated again in the morning; I am out of my sleep. I have to face difficult reality again before I receive my bliss with my boyfriend. Accordingly, if blinking out of existence means I will receive eternal silence and peace, I am all right with it. It's just like my birthday. Americans tend to make a big deal if their families forget to say "happy birthday" to them. I come from a different culture. I don't make a fuss about it. The day my family celebrates my existence is also the day other families mourn someone's loss of life. It's all about perspective. I don't think nothingness is such a horrible thing. Dying may be horrible. Death isn't, especially when it fits your definition "eternal rest"
  8. khminh

    What is the afterlife like?

    That is typical assumption from evangelical fundamentalist nurses. In their eyes, not believing in Jesus equates not being spiritual or worse, following Satan. Personally, I don't know what the afterlife is like. I don't have knowledge this aspect to have a belief in it. Maybe I simply return to dust; maybe I come back to the state that I was before I was born; maybe I go to some land that is not bound by space and time; maybe I will be in hell with Satan according to Christians. I really don't know, and I'm not afraid of saying I don't know. Buddhism believes in reincarnation, but there is no clear evidence about it, so I cannot say if I will reincarnate into a new life.
  9. I almost agree with everything you said until you say this. No offense. You are the privileged majority. You can lecture me all day about "a very small percentage of people out of the thousands I have encountered in my lifetime bother me this much", but what I said is still happening. It just happened with less frequency than before. In Matthew 19:16-22, according to Jesus, one only needs to follow 6 commandments to get to heaven. And yet many Christians want everyone to obey 10 commandments. They specifically talk about 10 commandments in Exodus 20. However, there are another set in Exodus 34. Honestly, I'm not sarcastic with you. I'm really serious here. If your point is that I don't have to be afraid of Christians because they no longer follow the Old covenants, then why do they want to keep 10 commandment monument in school or governmental offices? And why is it the set in Exodus 20 and not Exodus 34? Isn't this pick and choose? Well, they don't want to know when they find out that I am not heterosexual. I didn't even bring up romance topic. I just answer the question people ask me "What did you do this valentine?" I thought they genuinely wanted to know about my love life, so I was honest with them. The moment they realized I was not talking about a woman, they acted like they never asked me that question. My parents taught me when I should be proud of myself. I was not proud of doing that to him. I just wanted to shut him up for good. I may not be a bigger person, and I am all right with that. If this is a Muslim, I would have done the same since I read the Koran too. Even using words for self defense is not all right, either? I was not the one who provoked my colleague with religion. Maybe if you were my neighbor during the time I was visited by various sects of Christians, I would learn how to be tactful with my colleague. I always allow patients get a pass because I am convinced that they need to express themselves for emotional healing. I am always willing to pray with patients, go to church with them, read the Bible for them when they ask me to do so. With nurses and other people who are able bodied, I tend to place them in a higher standard. I guess I don't feel the need to be polite to them when they intentionally provoke me first. You can argue that they do so out of good will, but with my experience and values I inherit from my family and culture, it does feel like an attack because the doctrine in their faith is against (not just disagree) my values. This is like you would be horrified when I tell you that my culture allows people to eat dogs. You would think that Vietnamese culture is barbaric, and you are actually not wrong. In Vietnam, people would eat any type of animals. My family don't since we practice Buddhist compassion. I'm sure you would feel insulted if I tell you how delicious dog meat is and convince you to try it. I know what you mean. However, it is difficult to be firm on my ground, not to raise my tone, and still be nice to people. I always try to be diplomatic to certain point.
  10. You are correct. I don't hide my intolerance. When Christians hear me say "I don't worship your god", that is a good cue for them to stop pursuing the passive aggressive tactic. He kept going with proselytization. I needed to be rude to him for once so that I could be left in peace. It may not the best way to deter some annoying people. In my situation, it seemed to be the only way. As an atheist, you know that everyone can believe in whatever they want. When they want to convince others to believe the same thing, they need to show evidence. This colleague didn't. I admit that had I been an atheist, perhaps I would have had a more rational discourse with him. I sometimes don't understand myself. Listening to an atheist show never makes me upset. I guess my belief is indeed emotion based, not logic based. When I am challenged by logic, I don't get upset. When people use their faith to combat mine without me initiating it, I tend to lose my cool.
  11. I admit that I don't get much about socialization at allnurses. What I see is usually advice, tips, stories about patients and how to better nursing care for them. Then there is arguments about religion and politics. I don't see much social interaction here. Maybe you can guide me to the correct board for that purpose. I lived in this area of Oakland for about 4 years before my family moved to the current apartment. There was a Christian church a few blocks from my house. Its people stopped by my house every 2-3 weeks. They alternate with Mormons and Jehovah witnesses. If they didn't hand out pamphlets, there would be questions exactly like the ones we see in this board about Jesus, being saved, eternal damnation. Then I encountered a Mexican Catholic apologetic, a non-denominational Christian from Fresno, a California native Presbyterian, a Greek Romanian Orthodox, and a Southern Baptist from Louisiana in college. It was not a rural area, but the school was secluded from surroundings. At my former workplace in Castro Valley, I encountered some Russian Christians. At my current job, I have two Christian colleagues who are wonderful people. Occasionally I encountered bible believing fundamentalists, a Hare Krishna, and two Muslims. I don't deal with annoying Christians every day. However, unpleasant experience with them has cumulative effects on me. Especially after I read the whole Bible, I can be triggered fast by certain statements. I have met two self professed Jews so far. They are very nice people. I don't have any problem with them. When I said the Torah, I was talking about 5 books of Moses. I said that my childhood experience seeing chicken's throat cut and bled to death makes me more resilient when I read commandments in the Torah that ordered execution against non Hebrews. I think even Jason Vorhee's killings cannot be compared. You don't have to believe me. Just read Exodus, Numbers, Leviticus, you will understand. From my understanding, Jews always rely on the Talmud to understand the Torah. Christians, in contrast, actually believed these commandments were from God, and it was completely justified to kill anyone who violated any Mosaic laws. They believed that was good and just. That's why I get chill and become more cautious when I am around those Christians. I don't know what TMI means. Yes, I do bash people, but these people are nurses who spread ideas that are dehumanizing. These people are not patients. I never get in an argument with patients. You have seen questions from nurses who are not sure what to do when patients ask them to pray with them. I never have that dilemma. Let me give you one example. At one of my former jobs, I took care of this patient who met his daughter once a week. The other daughter barely contacted him, and the son almost never called him. He was a Christian, a serious one. There was a bus that took him to church every week. Since his daughter couldn't be with him when he was in church, he said to me my presence with him would comfort his soul greatly. He saw me like a kid of his. He knew that I didn't believe in Jesus, so he didn't push me. I wanted to give him my best, so it didn't take even 2 seconds to say yes. I went to church with him when I was not busy. That is with patients. With nurses, it's a totally different story. Nurses are not my patients; they are healthcare professionals like I am. Hence, if they stop behaving like a professional, I will treat them exactly like that. Beliefs are not worthy of respect. People are worthy of respect when they practice their beliefs for personal development. When they tell me I should believe like they do, they are not worthy of my respect, either. I don't appreciate it when Christians, moderate or evangelical, constantly say to me "we are all born sinners." First of all, I am not a Christian. I don't belong to this "we" in their statement. Second of all, my culture was influenced by Buddhism and Confucianism, in which it is believed that people were born inherently good and that they have worth. I carry this value with me to this country. When Christians classify me under their religion, they dig their own grave because I have to defend myself. If Christians say "I was born a sinner", they talk about themselves. When they say "We were born sinners," in a conversation with me, they include me under their religion, and I am entitled to smear them. It's fair game. This happened to me in the past: Colleague: Do you go to church? Me: No Colleague: Do you want to go to church with me this Sunday? Me: No, thank you. Colleague: It will be fun, you know. You can receive God's blessing, too. Me: I don't worship your god. Colleague: But he loves you and cares about your soul. Me: I don't need to be blessed by a deity who ordered his chosen people to execute every Canaanite, including children. I would have to sacrifice my humanity first before I receive his blessing. Receiving blessing from your god would make me a tyrant sympathizer. I have my dignity and my inner Buddha to lose here. That shut him up for good. I no longer saw him after that incident. It was a relief. What do you think? Am I justified for smearing him? As you can see, when Christians make their religious statement, they almost always include "you", "we", "they". They include me and people who are not members of their faith in their faith-based statements. Thus, I feel like I have every right to smear them. If you think I am too harsh on Christians, what is your advice if you were in my shoes dealing with people like that colleague of mine? Honestly, I want to know. I never initiate any religious conversation with other nurses. The Christian in my example didn't talk like a street preacher, but he clearly didn't respect my boundary. I feel like I had to be firm with him by exclusively stating the reason I don't worship his god. I don't know how to respond without smearing him. Maybe you can teach me how to respond tactfully. I have my principle compromised for patients. I don't know if I can do the same with nurses. I'm sorry. I'm not a Christian. That passage in Luke 6:39-45 doesn't apply to me. I feel totally fine judging people when they make statements about me using their religion. I am not a member of their faith, so I don't feel an obligation to be an object for them to talk about. When they want me to adhere to their faith, I am entitled to judge them. I don't mind them judging me back. I say what I need to say. I simply response to whatever answer pointed at me. I don't intend to drag this topic forever.
  12. I don't think so. How many nurses do you think actually put themselves aside for patients' sake in this board? Just a click and you can see they take advantage of this learning forum to recruit souls. I bet they think you are not a real Christian. So far, most evangelicals I have encountered are Christians. There were a few occasions I encountered Hare Krishna and Wahabi Muslims. There were too few of them for me to make a big deal. You have very high threshold for evangelical Christians. I wish I still had it. If I was a naive ignorant person who knew nothing about the Bible, perhaps my tolerance would be high. I'm not the same person again after reading the Bible. I'm not an atheist, but I have to agree with Richard Dawkins that no character I have known of can be compared to Yahweh. Even a fascist like Hitler is a breeze compared to Christian god. I don't understand how nurses, who are supposed to be a paragon of compassion in health care profession, can ask people to believe in a deity like Yahweh with zealotry. When I think about having a neighbor who is enamored with an executioner, I got chill to my spine. When I was a kid, I had seen my uncle cut a chicken's throat and bleed it to death. It troubled me a lot, but I was raised in that environment, so I had no choice but getting used to it. Otherwise, I wouldn't be able to pass reading the Torah. It is truly bizarre that people can take this seriously and consider it good and just. Where are you living? I don't know any place in this country where Christians are the minority. They may be less vocal, but that doesn't mean they are in minority. Even in California, where non Christians are supposed to feel safe, I still occasionally encountered some Bible-belt Christians. Perhaps you grew up in a religious culture and at least you are somewhat among the powerful group, so you can let it go easily. I was nurtured in a society where it is rude to provoke people's beliefs without their consent. My spirituality is personal, meaningful, and sacred to me. I am willing to let it be challenged in a right context. Otherwise, I prefer to keep it to myself just like what I am doing with my boyfriend at night. For patients' sake, I am happy to make an exception. It's difficult, but it is my calling when I choose to take care of them. With other nurses, it's a different story. I don't allow anyone to provoke me without asking me first. This is a common human decency and respect. Evangelical people don't seem to get it. I don't care what people believe in their own world. As long as they leave me out of it, I will be cool. I have met people who profess their love in someone that I cannot stand, but I let them know it is all right to love whoever that brings them happiness and tranquility. I admire your tolerance. I wish I had that high level of resilience before I open my mouth. In the past, I took huge courage to slam my door in front of two Baptists. I felt good doing so. It felt free for not zipping my lips and not allowing to Christians to think that they own the public sphere so that they can do whatever they want. I hate being rude to people, but sometimes enough is enough. I let Christians get a pass at school, at work, at my property for many times. I no longer have patience for them; hence, I will smear them without legal assistance when they don't respect my boundary.
  13. khminh

    Would you pray with a student?

    I could have done that, but then someone will think that I seek attention. I gave that scenario not because I want to coerce a nurse to practice my religion with me. I simply point out bias OP shows in her question. Would she encourage her student to continue practicing the faith she felt comfortable in or would she encourage her student to switch to Christianity? I say this because I experienced this myself with a Christian classmate. He used my circumstance as a soapbox to proselytize me. He talked with a gentle manner. What I despised was his intent. With a few other incidents, I develop a sense of detection whenever Christians ask other people questions about faith. It's almost never about helping other people's spirituality. It's almost always about seeking reinforcement for Christianity and enticing other people into it. You grew up in this society as a Christian. You may not understand. I grew up in Vietnam, where Christianity was not the dominant force. Nevertheless, I lived in a Catholic neighborhood for years before my family immigrated to the States. I had been respected for all those years until I encountered Christians in this country. Fortunately, they don't appear to me every day, but it's enough to make me annoyed by their constant condescending "I'll pray for you" mentality. I came to allnurses for learning, but I also need to voice my opinion where privileged class of people think that they can use a plurality platform to preach whenever they want. Christians are such class. I say what I need to say. I don't expect you to understand. With exception of my two colleagues, none of the Christians I have encountered understand or accept me. Although atheists believes that my belief is just as silly as other religious people, at least they accept me (I have yet met an atheist who tolerates me). The media is really unfair to them. Allnurses too. That's why I am aggressive towards exclusionary views from religious people.
  14. khminh

    Would you pray with a student?

    My posts have nothing to do with you. They respond to MrNurse, Brenda F. Johnson, and OldDude. What you believe in about Christianity and how you conduct yourself is none of my business. If you act like a respectful civilian before you act like a nurse, we are all good. The moment you spread your theology on me like MrNurse, you are fair game. This is OP's thread. I have yet responded to her. She can report my posts if they are irrelevant to her topic.
  15. khminh

    Would you pray with a student?

    You said that Then you say that A simple yes or no will suffice, and I won't bother you with replying. You go with this explanation for some reason I don't know. You want to continue this theological battle. Then I will honor your wish. You admit that you don't know anything about Zen stories, which have deep spiritual meaning behind them. You don't know what Buddhism is about. You don't know what Buddhists believe about afterlife. And yet you know for sure that what will happen to me after I die. You project your sentiment on me. Thank you very much for showing that you are dishonest just like the rest of fundamentalist Christians in the South, in the Midwest, and in allnurses. Even when I was the most serious practitioner of Buddhism, I never projected my sentiment on anyone who didn't share my religion. I only knew what would happen to me. What would happen to non Buddhists? I don't know. Without Jesus, you got lost. That's your belief. Somehow it also applies to me like gravity. Since when a mystical subjective experience is on the same ground as scientific facts? According to some branches of Buddhism, you would suffer for endless reincarnation if you don't accept what the Buddha teaches about 4 noble truths. It is worse since reincarnation makes you forget about your previous lives. It may cause you to commit more bad karma without even knowing it. Then eventually you will descend to 18 levels of hell. It's not pretty. There are hot Naraka and cold Naraka. Neither place is not nice. Your sentence is not eternal, but it may last 1018 years. If those beliefs are true, even your Jesus won't be able to save you. It's in your best interest to accept 4 noble truths and start practicing dharma to save yourself. Relying on 3 Buddhist gems is the best way to help yourself. No matter how much good karma you accumulate, it will run out eventually. Even when you ascend to heavens, eventually you will lose your good karma, and you will descend to the worst level of Naraka your soul can endure. ONLY THE TRUTH FROM THE BUDDHA CAN HELP YOU. How do you feel, MrNurse? Do you want me to say these things to your family if I am their nurse? I really care about their life after this life. I really care about where their souls are going to be. You can get me lose my license from BON, but I will have to say what I need in order to save their souls from cosmic justice. I no longer believe in this. Some Buddhists in my family do. I don't argue with them. However, even they don't believe that those consequences apply to non Buddhists. They nail those things on me because I used to believe in that horrific view. Even my family cannot differentiate what is a subjective experience and what is reality. At least, I'm relieved that they are not like Christians, who believe that somehow the whole world revolve around their born-again experience and dismiss other religions. If you cannot keep those views to yourself and spread them uninvited to patients, don't be surprised that other religious people will jump on your loved ones in the same manners. Just because this country is predominantly Christians doesn't mean they will be safe from people who have ardent religious beliefs like you. You will suffer someone's hell. Muslim hell, from what I read in the Koran, is just as bad as Christian hell. Your skin will be peeled off until you lose your conscence. Then Allah will resurrect your soul so that he can peel your skin again with fire. It is a disgrace to such a noble profession like nursing when some people project their subjective bigoted view about afterlife on vulnerably ill people. It's truly despicable. Even my most devout Christian colleagues never capture non Christians under their belief. Now I truly understand why a Bible belt is a Bible belt. It's really bizarre to have a neighbor, a colleague, a caregiver, a teacher whose mind is only filled with brim stones towards people who have a different spiritual path. English is not my first language, but is it really so bad that you don't understand my question? I ask if I am your patient and I want you to go to a shrine for the Buddha blessing with me, are you going to do it? If you are my patient and you want me to go to church with you, will I go with you? My answer is yes. For your well-being, I am willing to go outside my comfort zone. Will you do the same for me? I never meant to deviate this thread. I also gave the answer to the similar scenario in my posts. I would definitely pray with patients if they want me to, and I will encourage them to practice the path that makes them feel serene about themselves. I have seen cancer patients who pass away with a smile, and they were not Christians. A peaceful expression reflected on their face when they released their final breath. I feel like it is a good ending for humans in general. I have also seen Christians patients who died in horror despite how devout they were. I would never trade a peaceful ending of a human life for an ambiguous afterlife that requires fear in an unproven deity. I have too much respect for human worth to espouse such belief.
  16. Absolutely not. I have been an immigrant for 5 years and a naturalized citizen for 10 years. I have never participated in any vote that outlaws Christians practicing their faith at work. NEVER. I'm not an atheist. I don't side with atheists with every issue. Removal of 10 commandment monument at Oklahoma state was unnecessary. Vietnamese people typically don't like to involve with law enforcement unless they cannot help it. I'm Vietnamese, and I share similar view. Just because I despise Christians doesn't mean I will seek police help to wipe them out. I will do that myself without a fist. Believe whatever you want and leave me alone. Then we can get along. When you begin to tell me how much Jesus loves me, that I will be condemned for eternity without your god, that my spirituality leads me to eternal suffering, you are fair game. I don't care how nicely you express your view. When you invade my personal space, I will dismantle your faith with your own holy book. Same thing with Muslims, Hare Krishna, Sikhs, or even Buddhists. It's that simple. Patients can believe whatever they want. If they want my presence while they are praying, if they want me to go to church with them, if they want me to read the Bible with them, I will be honest with them that I don't believe in Yahweh. If they insist that my participation would make them feel better about themselves, I will not say no providing that I don't cross patient-provider boundary. Can you do the same for me as a Christian? Assuming that you have time and the policy allows it, if I ask you to be present when I pray to Bodhisattva, if I ask you to go to a shrine with me, if I ask you to read the beggar and the Buddha story for me, are you going to honor my wish and do that even though you don't believe what I believe?
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