My Nursing License Is At Risk - Or Is It? - page 4

by TheCommuter Senior Moderator | 39,315 Views | 68 Comments

I often listen as certain coworkers, usually the nurses with zero to two years of experience, chime about the dangers to their hard-earned nursing licenses. 的知 putting my license on the line by dealing with that difficult... Read More


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    I'm having difficulty finding the notice of discplinary for Washington state. Can anyone provide a link? It would be MUCH appreciated.
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    My license is being investigated because I did not straight cath a patient in a timely manner. The state says I violated the patient protection act. When I spoke to the investigator, I admitted that I should have handled the situation differently and apologized. I lost my job due to this and was having a difficult personal life, too. Now I am trying to find a new job and no one will hire me because of the open complaint on my license. I find this article reassuring but I am still very nervous and frustrated. I know I screwed up but I need a job. Just a reminder to be careful...even smaller things can cause a huge problem in your life.
    roughmatch likes this.
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    I agree with turnforthenrseRN and with everyone else. In school especially the instructors are always talking about "loosing your license." So, new nurses including myself get fearful of that, which is good to a certain point but you can't go through nursing scared of that. I have seen that a lot of the nurses that get their licenses revoked are the ones stealing narcotics and just don't have their life on the right track.
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    Quote from joanna_rn
    I'm having difficulty finding the notice of discplinary for Washington state. Can anyone provide a link? It would be MUCH appreciated.
    Not all state BON websites provide public notices of disciplinary action. If you cannot locate any pages of disciplinary action on your state BON's website, you will have to send a letter to the BON to request that they send this information to you.
    Quote from pikehm
    My license is being investigated because I did not straight cath a patient in a timely manner. The state says I violated the patient protection act. When I spoke to the investigator, I admitted that I should have handled the situation differently and apologized.
    Personally, I would try to avoid speaking to a state investigator without an attorney present because they are not exactly the nurse's friend in situations where allegations are made. I wish you the best of luck.
    roughmatch, GrnTea, and SummitRN like this.
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    Thanks for posting that link. I always hear stories about nurses losing their licenses and I'm always in fear.
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    I personally know at least half a dozen nurses (LPN and RN) who lost their licenses due to narcotic abuse/use/diversion in the last 2 or 3 years. There were several more I didn't know personally but knew of who lost their licenses for drugs. The only one I know of that didn't lose it due to drugs was one I went to high school with one who lost her license due to physical, mental and verbal abuse of the quad patient that she was the home care nurse for.

    On occasion I look through my state's disciplinary minutes and more ofthen than not its all drug and/or ETOH related.
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    All stories are the same and all involve nursing homes... hm
    bleverett likes this.
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    Quote from ThinkAgain
    The stories are all the same and all involve nursing homes... hm
    The stories are not quite the same. . .

    All of the stories involve nursing homes because the first four years of my short nursing career (2006 to 2010) had been spent working in nursing homes. Therefore, almost all of the nurses with whom I had been acquainted were/are working in LTC.

    If I had spent those years in another type of setting (telemetry, psych, ambulatory surgery, etc.), my true stories would most likely involve former coworkers from those specialties.
  9. 1
    Quote from Jory
    It is unlikely that a nurse would get sued AT ALL.

    That is why I can get $2 million in coverage for $158 per year and a doctor has to pay thousands.

    That is because statistically, they get sued and we don't.

    I am not saying nurses never get sued, I am just saying that if we got sued anywhere NEAR as often as physicians did, our malpractice insurance would be so high we couldn't afford to buy it.
    Only 158 dollars per year?

    You'd have to be a foolish or in a terrible financial constraints to NOT have malpractice insurance at that rate!
    annlewis likes this.
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    It takes a lot to actually have your license revoked in my state. I was found unconscious at work due to a pain medication addiction, turned myself in and am on a 5 year contract with the Board. I didn't work for about 8 months after getting clean/sober because I was in rehab, then intensive outpatient, then counseling, plus attending daily AA meetings. I gratefully have been employed for 3 1/2 years at the same facility and my license is only in danger of being revoked should I decide I want to drink, do drugs, or don't follow my contract. A colleage of mine was also on contract for being in recovery from methamphetamines; he had to test positive TWICE before they revoked his license. He has to wait 5 years to reapply. Another colleage of mine was diverting from the VA and was charged federally since it was a goverment building. She has multiple charges, has been clean/sober for almost 7 years and has been working as a nurse for the past 5 years. I could go on and on but none of us have had our licenses revoked and it would take not being compliant with our contract.

    I did see the disciplinary hearings for the Board as part of my contract and was shocked at the amount of nurses they had brought before the board for numerous offenses such as refusing to give an order for a medications (a drip that was only supposed to be administered in a unit, not on the floor; she was acting accordingly and her nurse supervisor turned on her). It turned out the nurse supervisor falsified all kinds of documents to try and get this newer nurse in serious trouble. The attorney for the nurse being investigated was awesome and was able to prove that the nursing supervisor falsified time records, blood glucose readings, etc. The newer nurse was absolved of any guilt and an investigation was opened on the nurse supervisor. Another was a case of leaving a bair hugger on a patient and causing third degree burns. She didn't use it properly and was subequently found guilty with her license revoked. There were others but those are the ones that stand out. It was eye opening to attend the disciplinary hearings and see how nurses throw one another under the bus. Scary, in fact.
    salvadordolly, rngolfer53, SummitRN, and 1 other like this.


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