was i unprofessional? (quick story) - page 3

by raindrop

7,794 Views | 60 Comments

I several years experience as charge nurse and I think I always handle people and situations quite well. However, at my current place of my employment, the first person who shows up for the shift is the charge nurse. Quite fine... Read More


  1. 6
    Quote from Reader007
    A couple more paragrahp spaces would be nice. But yes, as you wrote it, you do come across as a bit unprofessional, at least in what you've written.

    And that's coming from a carpenter, if it makes it easier to take.
    I find it rather unusual (to put it politely) that you feel a need to critique posts (punctuation, etc.) and answer questions on a nursing forum.

    Is it because your wife is a nurse? Is it because you feel that as a carpenter, you can add to the nursing conversation? Is it because there are no carpentry forums?

    It's just odd....
    Last edit by roser13 on Oct 14, '11
  2. 9
    Quote from JulieCVICURN
    It was unprofessional. It seems perfectly logical to me for the CN to load herself up with patients so that she doesn't have to take an admission, because she's got additional responsibilities. One of the most time consuming aspects of patient care is doing admission/discharge duties, so setting herself up to avoid that possibility is not only appropriate, but efficient and smart.

    The CN, even if you think they don't have many additional duties, is held responsible for knowing the status of her entire unit at all times, not just her own patients, and has to be able to answer for any incidents that occur on her shift. Many places have CN roles that don't take any patient load at all.
    But she doesn't have additional responsibilities. I've said it 3 or 4 times already.....she is only responsible for making assignments for our shift. I know this for a fact. I know this for a fact because more often than not, I am charge. I am not assuming she doesn't have additional duties....I KNOW she doesn't. And the other nurse knows she didn't either. The charge nurse does not need to know anything that is going on with any of our patients. At the end of her shift, she simply reports off about her patients to the oncoming nurse and LEAVES. Just like the rest of us.
    anotherone, JBudd, rn/writer, and 6 others like this.
  3. 15
    I think we're all imposing our facility P&Ps on the OP's facility, which isn't necessarily the same thing. I've known of facility's where "charge" is more or less like OP said, and if that's the case, then I think it's perfectly reasonable for her to feel and act as she did. At my facility, there's a lot more responsibility, so we do try to avoid charge taking admits, or limiting them.
    But really, once again in a thread, we've got a bunch of people that think what happens in their facility is the truth/law/way it's done EVERYWHERE.
    anotherone, rn/writer, cherrybreeze, and 12 others like this.
  4. 2
    Quote from roser13
    I find it rather unusual (to put it politely) that you feel a need to critique posts (punctuation, etc.) and answer questions on a nursing forum.

    Is it because your wife is a nurse? Is it because you feel that as a carpenter, you can add to the nursing conversation? Is it because there are no carpentry forums?

    It's just odd....
    Glad to know I am not the only one who thinks this is inappropriate.
    sparklie.lady and wooh like this.
  5. 3
    If she has no additional duties, she is just trying to avoid taking admissions.

    Like two nurses sharing a hall, one takes 7 and gives the other 5, at first glance looks like a good deal until you realize one nurse gets no admission and one gets two.
    anotherone, JennyMac, and wooh like this.
  6. 1
    why on earth do you have that many patients?
    batmik likes this.
  7. 6
    all nurses?

    hah

    patients, students, pre students, cnas, among others, and now carpenters
    Old.Timer, diva rn, JennyMac, and 3 others like this.
  8. 0
    Not only were you unprofessional, you were insubordinate. You refuse an assignment you can be fired. "Charge nurse" means "in charge", and you should expect no more respect than you give.
  9. 5
    The OP has explained that at this workplace "charge nurse" is not really a charge nurse.
    I have worked in places that had this type of charge. It just meant that if something out of the ordinary went down, that person would would be the first one to try to fix it. Teams were split evenly and all experienced nurses took their turn at it.
    The other type of charge nurse (the one who helps room pts, starts admits, facilitates discharges, puts out fires, coordinates with other departments, etc..,) of course would not have the same number of patients if any at all.
    kalevra, alem-tsahai, JennyMac, and 2 others like this.
  10. 2
    Quote from roser13
    I find it rather unusual (to put it politely) that you feel a need to critique posts (punctuation, etc.) and answer questions on a nursing forum.

    Is it because your wife is a nurse? Is it because you feel that as a carpenter, you can add to the nursing conversation? Is it because there are no carpentry forums?

    It's just odd....
    Being a professional in terms of interaction with fellow employees is not limited to nursing. Carpenters do it, too, and perhaps better as a group than nurses.

    I came to nursing after a couple decades in another industry, in worker and administrative jobs.

    Interpersonal skills are not dependent on the job one does.

    The carpenter was not presuming to comment about clinical matters, but about the topic of the thread: whether the OP acted unprofessionally.

    I don't see the harm in listening to, and perhaps learning from, others who have similar personal interactions in their workplaces.
    kalevra and morte like this.


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